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Microbes on Your Mind : Article : Scientific American Mind

Microbes on Your Mind : Article : Scientific American Mind | Biology | Scoop.it
Scientific American is the world's premier magazine of scientific discovery and technological innovation for the general public. Readers turn to it for a deep understanding of how science and technology can influence human affairs and illuminate the natural world.
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Interesting links between microbial fauna and probiotics.  Good examples for #Cblock and prospective medics.

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News: GCSE and A-Level Reform Content | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Education Community

News: GCSE and A-Level Reform Content | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Education Community | Biology | Scoop.it
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At the moment we are spared this - iGCSE Biology and pre-U.  I can't imagine the improvements will be what I would like to see - less content, more focus on process + learning, less on factual accumulation and rigour......

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BBC - Science & Nature - Human Body and Mind - Interactive Body

BBC - Science & Nature - Human Body and Mind - Interactive Body | Biology | Scoop.it
An exploration of the human body and its functions
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Some good revision games to play here.  All need Flash.

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A-Z of Top eLearning Trends You Should Know!

A-Z of Top eLearning Trends You Should Know! | Biology | Scoop.it

This A-Z of Top eLearning Trends infographic is a fantastic resource for modern teachers. It covers concepts you should know when integrating technology into the classroom.

 

ExamTime.com is a new free online learning platform designed to transform learning into an 'active' process using proven tools & techniques - Mind Maps, Flashcards, Quizzes, Notes & more. Get started at www.examtime.com.

 

 


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Hilde B Vik's curator insight, April 17, 10:04 AM
Her kommer en forklaring på digitale ord og begreper.
Megan Hoban's curator insight, May 26, 1:51 AM
This seems like a great tool - it's free to sign up and has apps for apple and windows based mobile devices. 
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Craig Venter Wants to Build the World’s Biggest Database for Genome Information

Craig Venter Wants to Build the World’s Biggest Database for Genome Information | Biology | Scoop.it
“Craig Venter’s new company wants to improve human longevity by creating the world’s largest, most comprehensive database of genetic and physiological information.”Human Longevity, based in San Diego, says it will sequence some 40,000 human genomes per year to start, using Illumina’s new high-throughput sequencing machines (Illumina Has the First $1,000 Genome).Eventually, it plans to work its way up to 100,000 genomes per year. The company will also sequence the genomes of the body’s multitudes of microbial inhabitants, called the microbiome, and analyze the thousands of metabolites that can be found in blood and other patient samples.By combining these disparate types of data, the new company hopes to make inroads into the enigmatic process of aging and the many diseases, including cancer and heart disease, that are strongly associated with it. “Aging is exerting a force on humans that is exposing us to diseases, and the diseases are idiosyncratic, partly based on genetics, partly on environment,” says Leonard Guarente, who researches aging at MIT and is not involved in the company. “The hope for many of us who study aging is that by having interventions that hit key pathways in aging, we can affect disease.”To that end, Human Longevity will collaborate with Metabolon, a company based in Durham, North Carolina, to profile the metabolites circulating in the bloodstreams of study participants. Metabolon was an early pioneer in the field of metabolomics, which catalogues the amino acids, fats, and other small molecules in a blood or other sample to develop more accurate diagnostic tests for diseases (Metabolomics).Metabolon uses mass spectrometry to identify small molecules in a sample. In a human blood sample, there are around 1,200 different types; Metabolon’s process can also determine the amount of each one present. While genome sequencing can provide information about inherited risk of disease and some hints of the likelihood that a person will have a long life, metabolic data provides information on how environment, diet, and other features of an individual’s life affect health.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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One for C block Biologists #preU
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SlideIdea: An Innovative, Interactive Presentation App for the iPad

SlideIdea: An Innovative, Interactive Presentation App for the iPad | Biology | Scoop.it
“ Looking for a different way to present content and engage students in your lessons? Take a look at SlideIdea - a free app for the iPad that sets out to rival Keynote, Nearpod, Haiku Deck, Swipe and...”
Via Sam Gliksman
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This could be very good too: has anyone used it?
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20 Google Docs Secrets for busy teachers and students.

20 Google Docs Secrets for busy teachers and students. | Biology | Scoop.it
“ Google Docs has revolutionised the way we create and edit content on the web. It is a genuine collaboration tool like nothing that has come before it.”
Via Donna Browne, Cindy Chabot, Ron Monin
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GoogleDocs has changed my life - well worth a read
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Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: Design Your Digital Classroom ICE 2014

Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: Design Your Digital Classroom ICE 2014 | Biology | Scoop.it
Sharing resources from a full day workshop I facilitated at #ICE14, Design Your Digital Classroom
Via Susan Oxnevad, Ron Monin
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Learn More About OLI | Open Learning Initiative

Learn More About OLI | Open Learning Initiative | Biology | Scoop.it
The Open Learning Initiative (OLI) is a grant-funded group at Carnegie Mellon University, offering innovative online courses to anyone who wants to learn or teach. Our aim is to create high-quality courses and contribute original research to improve learning and transform higher education.
Via Dennis T OConnor
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Columbia Scientists Identify Key Cells in Touch Sensation

Columbia Scientists Identify Key Cells in Touch Sensation | Biology | Scoop.it
In a study published online today in the journal Nature, a team of Columbia University Medical Center researchers led by Ellen Lumpkin, PhD, associate professor of somatosensory biology, solve an age-old mystery of touch: how cells just beneath the skin surface enable us to feel fine details and textures.Touch is the last frontier of sensory neuroscience. The cells and molecules that initiate vision—rod and cone cells and light-sensitive receptors—have been known since the early 20th century, and the senses of smell, taste, and hearing are increasingly understood. But almost nothing is known about the cells and molecules responsible for initiating our sense of touch.This study is the first to use optogenetics—a new method that uses light as a signaling system to turn neurons on and off on demand—on skin cells to determine how they function and communicate.The team showed that skin cells called Merkel cells can sense touch and that they work virtually hand in glove with the skin’s neurons to create what we perceive as fine details and textures.“These experiments are the first direct proof that Merkel cells can encode touch into neural signals that transmit information to the brain about the objects in the world around us,” Dr. Lumpkin said.Several conditions—including diabetes and some cancer chemotherapy treatments, as well as normal aging—are known to reduce sensitive touch. Merkel cells begin to disappear in one’s early 20s, at the same time that tactile acuity starts to decline. “No one has tested whether the loss of Merkel cells causes loss of function with aging—it could be a coincidence—but it’s a question we’re interested in pursuing,” Dr. Lumpkin said.In the future, these findings could inform the design of new “smart” prosthetics that restore touch sensation to limb amputees, as well as introduce new targets for treating skin diseases such as chronic itch.The study was published in conjunction with a second study by the team done in collaboration with the Scripps Research Institute. The companion study identifies a touch-activated molecule in skin cells, a gene called Piezo2, whose discovery has the potential to significantly advance the field of touch perception.“The new findings should open up the field of skin biology and reveal how sensations are initiated,” Dr. Lumpkin said. Other types of skin cells may also play a role in sensations of touch, as well as less pleasurable skin sensations, such as itch. The same optogenetics techniques that Dr. Lumpkin’s team applied to Merkel cells can now be applied to other skin cells to answer these questions.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Synthetic DNA advance is hailed

Synthetic DNA advance is hailed | Biology | Scoop.it

 ste

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This is the next step for genetic engineering - a eukaryote chromosome that is totally man-made.  Exciting stuff!

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Baby Octopuses: Pickier Eaters Than Baby Humans - Scientific American (blog)

Baby Octopuses: Pickier Eaters Than Baby Humans - Scientific American (blog) | Biology | Scoop.it
Scientific American (blog) Baby Octopuses: Pickier Eaters Than Baby Humans Scientific American (blog) “Knowledge about developmental biology and digestive physiology…is insufficient and even zero in some species,” the group wrote in a new paper,...

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Natural Selection - Crash Course Biology #14

Hank guides us through the process of natural selection, the key mechanism of evolution. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dftba.com/produ...
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Goats are far more intelligent than previously thought

Goats are far more intelligent than previously thought | Biology | Scoop.it
New research from Queen Mary University of London shows goats learn how to solve complicated tasks quickly and can recall how to perform them for at least 10 months, which might explain their remarkable ability to adapt to harsh environments.Writing in the journal Frontiers in Zoology today, the scientists trained a group of goats to retrieve food from a box using a linked sequence of steps; first by pulling a lever with their mouths and then by lifting it to release the reward.The goats' ability to remember the task was tested after one month and again at 10 months. They learned the task within 12 trials and took less than two minutes to remember the challenge. "The speed at which the goats completed the task at 10 months compared to how long it took them to learn indicates excellent long-term memory," said co-author Dr Elodie Briefer, now based at ETH Zürich.Before each learning session, some of the goats had the opportunity to watch another goat to demonstrate the task. Dr. Briefer added: "We found that those without a demonstrator were just as fast at learning as those that had seen demonstrations. This shows that goats prefer to learn on their own rather than by watching others."This is the first time that scientists have investigated how goats learn complex physical cognition tasks, which could explain why they are so adaptable to harsh environments and good at foraging for plants in the wild, for example.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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5 Reasons to Try iBooks Author

5 Reasons to Try iBooks Author | Biology | Scoop.it
“ There are so many ways that iPads can be used in the classroom, and one of my favorite things about these tablets is the ability to use iBooks with students. Although there are tons of great options”
Via Sam Gliksman
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I am preparing resources for the summer in iBooks: watch this space
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Using Social Media to Teach Visual Literacy in the 21st Century Classroom

Using Social Media to Teach Visual Literacy in the 21st Century Classroom | Biology | Scoop.it
That we have evolved our favorite forms of communication is obvious without more than simply watching our students walk through the hallways. It would be easy to demonize social media and each medium that it provides for human interaction. But it would be educationally valuable to embrace it, turning it into an opportunity for our students to develop an appreciation for the advanced cognitive skills they employ on a daily basis. Why not study the highly visual communication models connecting the thoughts that mean the most to them with the social networks where they live their lives?
Via Nik Peachey, Ron Monin
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Poll Everywhere

Poll Everywhere | Biology | Scoop.it
“Poll Everywhere is the cheapest Audience Response System available. Plans include free text message voting and polling.”
Via Dennis T OConnor
Paul Gillam's insight:
I am looking for software that I can use for AfL feedback from students in class. Has anyone used this? Or recommend something else?
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