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Rescooped by Clarence Lim from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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Why Do So Many People Still Doubt Climate Change? | Slate.com

Why Do So Many People Still Doubt Climate Change? | Slate.com | Biology | Scoop.it

When scholars of the future write the history of climate change, they may look to early 2008 as a pivotal moment. Al Gore's film An Inconvenient Truth was bringing the science to the masses. The economist Nicholas Stern had made the financial case for tackling the problem sooner rather than later. And the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change had just issued its most unequivocal report yet on the link between human activity and climatic change.

 

The scientific and economic cases were made. Surely with all those facts on the table, soaring public interest and ambitious political action were inevitable?

 

The exact opposite happened. Fast-forward to today, with the release of the IPCC's latest report on the state of climate science, and it is clear that public concern and political enthusiasm have not kept up with the science. Apathy, lack of interest, and even outright denial are more widespread than they were in 2008.

 

How did the rational arguments of science and economics fail to win the day? There are many reasons, but an important one concerns human nature.

 

Through a growing body of psychological research, we know that scaring or shaming people into sustainable behavior is likely to backfire. We know that it is difficult to overcome the psychological distance between the concept of climate change—not here, not now—and people's everyday lives. We know that beliefs about the climate are influenced by extreme and even daily weather.

 

One of the most striking findings is that concern about climate change is not only, or even mostly, a product of how much people know about science. Increased knowledge tends to harden existing opinions.

 

These findings and many more are increasingly available to campaigners and science communicators, but it is not clear that lessons are being learned. In particular there is a great deal of resistance toward the idea that communicating climate change requires more than explaining the science.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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EnviroJMS's curator insight, October 2, 2013 7:16 AM

Interesting insight into the different views on climate change

Mosa

Lee Pratt, MASS, MSA's curator insight, October 2, 2013 2:35 PM

subcontiasly, I remember how little control I had over the tempeture as an infant. I think that is why we get so totally defeated when thinking about climate change, what do you think? 

Rescooped by Clarence Lim from World Environment Nature News
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nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Understanding Biodiversity Patterns in Nature: It Takes Two Fields--Ecology and Evolutionary Biology - US National Science Foundation (NSF)

nsf.gov - National Science Foundation (NSF) News - Understanding Biodiversity Patterns in Nature: It Takes Two Fields--Ecology and Evolutionary Biology - US National Science Foundation (NSF) | Biology | Scoop.it
Understanding Biodiversity Patterns in Nature: It Takes Two Fields--Ecology and Evolutionary Biology: What do ... http://t.co/OC6pUkA3hA

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Clarence Lim from World Environment Nature News
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Salamander Study May Change Scientific View of Importance of Evolution in Ecological Research

Salamander Study May Change Scientific View of Importance of Evolution in Ecological Research | Biology | Scoop.it
UConn biologist Mark Urban has published research on salamanders that details the eco-evolutionary processes that explain patterns of biodiversity.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Clarence Lim from Amazing Science
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Invasive Snail Protects Its Young With Odd Poison

Invasive Snail Protects Its Young With Odd Poison | Biology | Scoop.it

Many kinds of snails are invading ecosystems all over the world, but the apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata) has a unique advantage: Almost no predators will eat its eggs. That's because the bright pink objects (see picture) are filled with a neurotoxin that scares off every predator except for red fire ants. Now, researchers have discovered that the neurotoxin, called PcPV2, is quite unusual for animals. First, it's a so-called AB toxin, and its two subunits share homology with membrane attack complex/perforin (MACPF)-like toxins and tachylectin-like lectins, a previously unknown structure that resembles plant Type-2 ribosome-inactivating proteins and bacterial botulinum toxins. The protomer has therefore a novel AB toxin combination of a MACPF-like chain linked by disulfide bonds to a lectin-like chain, indicating a delivery system for the former. And second, the apple snail creates it in an unprecedented way, combining a pair of molecules that resemble those belonging to the immune system of other animals. As for the embryonic snails, cocooned in a toxic egg, they are equipped with enzymes that can degrade the neurotoxin and use it for nutrition during development, the researchers reported. The acquisition of this unique neurotoxic/antinutritive/storage protein may confer the eggs a survival advantage, opening new perspectives in the study of the evolution of animal defensive strategies.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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