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Please Stop Using These 15 Words In Your LinkedIn Profile IMMEDIATELY

Please Stop Using These 15 Words In Your LinkedIn Profile IMMEDIATELY | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
They don't make you look creative or innovative.
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Media Cultures: Microbiology in the news
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New study sheds light on how Salmonella spreads in the body

New study sheds light on how Salmonella spreads in the body | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Scientists have discovered a new mechanism used by bacteria to spread in the body. The mechanism offers the potential to identify targets to prevent the dissemination of the infection process.

Via Iain Haysom
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Media Cultures: Microbiology in the news
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Small Things Considered: Why Listeria Is Competent to Be Virulent

Small Things Considered: Why Listeria Is Competent to Be Virulent | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
It is downright scandalous that in our hi-tech world food-borne infectionsshould be so prevalent (some 48 million cases a year in the US alone, with about 3000 deaths).

Via Iain Haysom
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Twisted Microbiology
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How to Use Twitter Friends As Sensors to Detect Disease Outbreaks

How to Use Twitter Friends As Sensors to Detect Disease Outbreaks | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it

There is intense interest in studying the way information flows through the Twitter network and how this information can be used to measure and even predict public opinion or disease outbreaks. But all this work shares a common problem: the sheer volume of data that Twitter generates. It’s simply not possible to follow what everybody is doing all the time. New research suggests there’s a better way to track the spread of information on Twitter that is much more powerful.

 

Via @pathogenomenick @NAChristakis @James_H_Fowler

 

Research paper:

"Using Friends as Sensors to Detect Global-Scale Contagious Outbreaks"

http://arxiv.org/abs/1211.6512


Via Cesar Sanchez
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from The Agrobiodiversity Grapevine
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Animal Domestication: In Search of the Wild Chicken

From Science.

Animal Domestication:  In Search of the Wild Chicken


Via Bioversity Library
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Modern Agricultural Biotechnology
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Blanket ban on GM food imports overlooked benefits of science - Letters - nation.co.ke

The recent Cabinet ban on the importation of GM foods citing health risks was unfortunate.

It was clear proof that we are still sceptical about the role of science in economic growth.

I fully support the Cabinet’s concern on the rising cases of cancer. However, this should be investigated holistically without pointing fingers at GM foods.

It should be noted that genetic modification, which is the application of scientific knowledge to transfer beneficial genetic traits from one species to another to obtain desired results, is not alien science.

This technology was first accomplished in 1973 and soon found commercial applications in medicine.

In 1982 the Food and Drug Administration of the US approved the use of human insulin produced by a genetically engineered bacterium.

Genetically modified animal vaccine came next, followed by genetically modified agricultural crops, first approved for commercial use in 1996.

Approximately one-quarter of all the drugs coming into the market today are produced using GMOs and the boom in GM medical drugs is likely to continue.

No one has raised a voice against GM drugs even in cases where there is clear evidence, developed from clinical trials, of extreme side effects.

For example, zevalin, a popular GM drug for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, can cause severely reduced white blood cell count resulting in both gastrointestinal and respiratory complications.

This is a clear indication that the opposition meted on GMs foods is not all about the technology. We should not apply double standards.

The development of a GM crop normally requires at least 10 years, during which rigorous laboratory and field trials are done.

Feeding trials are then done with animals. The scientific methods used to develop GM products assure safety.

In fact, there are reports that in the case of maize, the consumer health risk is decreased when eating food from GM varieties.

Modern crop biotechnology has the potential to improve use of scarce land, improve crop yield, enhance nutritional value of some food crops and most importantly minimise the use of pesticides, insecticides and herbicides.

Yet, despite this immense potential, genetic modification is still widely misunderstood and is a victim of premeditated smear and scare campaigns.

As a country, we stand to gain a lot in terms of food productivity if we adopt GM technology, hence it is paramount that we make decisions based on proven facts; we should not reject this technology out of ignorance.


Via Kwame Ogero
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Blind patient reads words stimulated directly onto retina: Neuroprosthetic device uses implant to project visual braille

Blind patient reads words stimulated directly onto retina: Neuroprosthetic device uses implant to project visual braille | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
For the very first time researchers have streamed braille patterns directly into a blind patient's retina, allowing him to read four-letter words accurately and quickly with an ocular neuroprosthetic device.
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Barley genome could hold key to better beer

Barley genome could hold key to better beer | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Scientists have published a high resolution draft of the barley genome. The research will help to produce new and better barley varieties that are vital for the beer and whisky industries.
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Virology News
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New deadly virus may be 'bat bug'

New deadly virus may be 'bat bug' | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it

"Bats may be the source of a new Sars-like virus which killed a man in Saudi Arabia, according to an analysis of the coronavirus' genome.

Two other people have been infected and one, who was flown to the UK for treatment in September, is still in intensive care.

Experts, writing in the journal mBio, said the virus was closely related to other viruses in bats.

It is thought the virus does not pass readily from one person to another.

Coronaviruses are a family of viruses ranging from the common cold to the Sars (severe acute respiratory syndrome) virus. They infect a wide range of animals."

 

I repeat: fear the bat...there are lots of them, and they have a LOT of viruses that can infect people.


Via Ed Rybicki
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Plant Breeding and Genetics
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Clocks are ticking and climate is changing: Increasing plant productivity in a changing climate

Clocks are ticking and climate is changing: Increasing plant productivity in a changing climate | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Scientists are looking to cellular biological clocks as a target for genetic modification for increasing plant productivity.

Via Valerio Hoyos-Villegas
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Virology News
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Forget popping vitamins, MEDITATION could stave off colds and flu

Forget popping vitamins, MEDITATION could stave off colds and flu | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Adults who meditated or did moderately intense exercise for eight weeks suffered fewer colds than those who did nothing, according to a study from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Via Ed Rybicki
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Virology News
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Studies demonstrate costs of HPV vaccinations in low income countries | Vaccine News Daily

Studies demonstrate costs of HPV vaccinations in low income countries | Vaccine News Daily | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it

Two recently published studies highlighted the costs of delivering vaccinations for human papillomavirus to primary school girls in Tanzania.

The studies both found that the cost of delivering the HPV vaccine to adolescent girls might be significantly higher than delivering vaccines to infants when the delivery schedule matches the established infant immunization schedule, MedicalXpress reports.

The first study, conducted by the World Health Organization, the National Institute for Medical Research in Tanzania and the London School of Hygiene, tested class-based and age-based vaccination in three districts in Tanzania. The study found that class-based delivery was generally cheaper at an estimated $9.76 per fully immunized girl and $1.3 million overall, excluding vaccine costs.

The second study, conducted by Raymond Hutubessy from the WHO and his colleagues, used the new Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing tool during a five year planning period. The study estimated that the vaccine could be delivered at $12.40 for each fully immunized girl.


Via Ed Rybicki
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Twisted Microbiology
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Of Microbes and Men

Of Microbes and Men | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it

Jack Gilbert: “We're going to determine how good and bad bacteria co-exist in a hospital, and how the good can keep out the bad.” Gilbert and his team are going to collect microbial samples from surfaces and the air, from staff and patients for two years to better understand the factors that influence bacterial population development in healthcare environments. In stark contrast to current epidemiological studies that typically look at a few pathogens, they will track more than 100,000 different species.


Via Cesar Sanchez
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Contemporary Food Issues
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Tomorrows Table: What does GMO really mean?

Tomorrows Table: What does GMO really mean? | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Tomorrows Table: What does GMO really mean?

Via Iain Haysom
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Virology News
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Making a Flu Vaccine Without the Virus | Wired Science | Wired.com

Making a Flu Vaccine Without the Virus | Wired Science | Wired.com | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
A new vaccine strategy could make flu shots cheaper, safer, and easier to produce.

...scientists at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute (Germany’s Federal Research Institute for Animal Health), and biotech company CureVac in Tübingen have ... designed a piece of mRNA encoding the hemagglutinin of the influenza strain H1N1. Cells use mRNA to shuttle the information contained in the genome from the nucleus into the periphery of the cell, where it is translated into a protein. By injecting synthetic mRNA into the skin of mice, the researchers coaxed the animals’ cells into producing the virus protein themselves. This elicited an immune response that later protected the animals from infection with otherwise lethal doses of influenza virus, the researchers reported online on 25 November in Nature Biotechnology.

 

Yessss....welll....ummmmm....  No, it wouldn't be cheaper: RNA is EXPENSIVE to make under any circumstances.  And there is a published alternative that would probably be MUCH easier: encapsidating mRNA made in cells via an alphavirus vector, in Tobacco mosaic virus coat protein!

 

Virology. 2007 Feb 20;358(2):321-33. Epub 2006 Oct 2.
Assembly of trans-encapsidated recombinant viral vectors engineered from Tobacco mosaic virus and Semliki Forest virus and their evaluation as immunogens.
Smith ML, Corbo T, Bernales J, Lindbo JA, Pogue GP, Palmer KE, McCormick AA.


Via Ed Rybicki
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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Nursing the Flu With Help From Apps

Nursing the Flu With Help From Apps | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Apps can do more than keep you company when you’re sick; they can give you medical advice.

Via burkesquires
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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#vaccine #GoodGrief #Congress holds an anti-vaccination hearing - Forbes

#vaccine #GoodGrief #Congress holds an anti-vaccination hearing - Forbes | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Congress held a hearing last Thursday to promote the discredited claims that vaccines cause autism and that mercury causes autism.

 

A good disection by Steven Salzberg -  and some real facts and truths about vaccines.

 

 


Via Chris Upton + helpers
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Science-Videos
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National Geographic: How to Build a Beating Heart [Video]

Scientists are beginning to harness the body's natural powers to grow skin, muscle, body parts and vital organs — even hearts.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Beneficial microbes are 'selected and nurtured' in the human gut

Beneficial microbes are 'selected and nurtured' in the human gut | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Animals, including humans, actively select the gut microbes that are the best partners and nurture them with nutritious secretions, suggests a new study.
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New strain of bird virus sweeps across Britain

New strain of bird virus sweeps across Britain | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Scientists report on the impact avian pox is having on great tit populations.
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Extra chromosome 21 removed from Down syndrome cell line

Extra chromosome 21 removed from Down syndrome cell line | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Scientists succeeded in removing the extra copy of chromosome 21 in cell cultures derived from a person with Down syndrome. Persons with this condition have three copies of this chromosome.
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The Potential Health Benefits of Parasitic Gut Worms | Wired Science | Wired.com

The Potential Health Benefits of Parasitic Gut Worms | Wired Science | Wired.com | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
A dose of parasitic whipworms cured monkeys with chronic diarrhea, fixing immune systems gone haywire and offering a snapshot of the unexpected benefits worms -- which might someday be used as living vaccines -- offer to people.
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Last life on Earth: microbes will rule the far future - life - 01 November 2012 - New Scientist

Last life on Earth: microbes will rule the far future - life - 01 November 2012 - New Scientist | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
A timeline for habitability on rocky planets around sun-like stars offers a glimpse of Earth's future and a way to search for alien life in places we might...
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Rescooped by Marthèlize Tredoux from Virology News
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Pirates of the Caudovirales

Pirates of the Caudovirales | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
Molecular piracy is a biological phenomenon in which one replicon (the pirate) uses the structural proteins encoded by another replicon (the helper) to package...

Via Ed Rybicki
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Detection, analysis of 'cell dust' may allow diagnosis, monitoring of brain cancer

Detection, analysis of 'cell dust' may allow diagnosis, monitoring of brain cancer | Biology & Biotech baubles | Scoop.it
A novel miniature diagnostic platform using nuclear magnetic resonance technology is capable of detecting minuscule cell particles known as microvesicles in a drop of blood.
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