Biology 1
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Unique skull find rebuts theories on species diversity in early humans

Unique skull find rebuts theories on species diversity in early humans | Biology 1 | Scoop.it
Paleoanthropologists have uncovered the intact skull of an early Homo individual in Dmanisi, Georgia.
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All About Top 10 Newly Discovered Species of 2012 | Viva Technics

All About Top 10 Newly Discovered Species of 2012 | Viva Technics | Biology 1 | Scoop.it
By National Geographic | May 23, 2013 New Old World Monkey Spotted by researchers in the Lomami Basin of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2007, the lesula monkey (Cercopithecus lomamiensis) is only the second new species of monkey found in...
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Cell Structure

Cell Structure | Biology 1 | Scoop.it

Discover and explore the micro world of cells with this well design flash resource. Browse interactive diagrams of various types of living cells and try the quiz to test your knowledge.
http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science


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Understanding metastatic breast cancer

Understanding metastatic breast cancer | Biology 1 | Scoop.it

"October 13 was National Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day.  Why does metastatic breast cancer deserve to have its own day? Because everyone knows what breast cancer is, but there is very little knowledge about what metastasis means.

First of all, metastasis can be a component of every cancer.  Metastasis is when cancer cells escape from the original cancer site and travel through the bloodstream, attaching themselves to a vital organ.

When this happens, most often your cancer becomes incurable.  It is also referred to as Stage 4 cancer.

My breast cancer cells left my breast and traveled through my bloodstream, attaching themselves to my bones and then my liver. Does this mean I have liver cancer? Does it mean I have bone cancer?  No."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, October 18, 2013 1:48 PM

Noreen Fraser writes about how she has Stage IV metastatic breast cancer (MBC). She writes about how difficult chemo is and that she is on a Phase I trial that is working and luckily doesn't have awful side effects. MBC research is so important. For more information follow the rest of the article.

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, October 19, 2013 2:09 PM

Education overcomes ignorance and generates understanding...here's to more education about and action around cancer and less branding of it!  People face the challenge of cancer every day ~ giving it a month and a color is not enough.

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Genetically Modified Foods and PR Wars: Fighting Against Biotech Giants - Center for Research on Globalization

Genetically Modified Foods and PR Wars: Fighting Against Biotech Giants - Center for Research on Globalization | Biology 1 | Scoop.it
Genetically Modified Foods and PR Wars: Fighting Against Biotech Giants Center for Research on Globalization This was affirmed in a report to the UN Human Rights Council last year showing that the scientific literature demonstrates that the...
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Biology Guide

Biology Guide | Biology 1 | Scoop.it

A great site with superb resources for A Level Biology. The site has clear revision guides and notes for a wide range of topics.
http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Science


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Top Ten Most Beautiful Birds in the World | Viva Technics

Top Ten Most Beautiful Birds in the World | Viva Technics | Biology 1 | Scoop.it
By | Jul 16, 2013 | Wikipedia, Places of Heaven
Birds (class Aves) are feathered, winged, bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals.
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Drug Helps Viruses Kill Cancer Cells

Drug Helps Viruses Kill Cancer Cells | Biology 1 | Scoop.it

"Parvoviruses cause no harm in humans, but they can attack and kill cancer cells. Since 1992, scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) have been studying these viruses with the aim of developing a viral therapy to treat glioblastomas, a type of aggressively growing brain cancer. A clinical trial has been conducted since 2011 at the Heidelberg University Neurosurgery Hospital to test the safety of treating cancer patients with the parvovirus H-1.

 "We obtained impressive results in preclinical trials with parvovirus H-1 in brain tumors," says Dr. Antonio Marchini, a virologist at DKFZ. "However, the oncolytic effect of the viruses is weaker in other cancers. Therefore, we are searching for ways to increase the therapeutic potential of the viruses." In doing so, the virologists also tested valproic acid, a compound belonging to a group of drugs called HDAC inhibitors. These inhibitors raise the transcription of many genes that have been chemically silenced. Valproic acid is commonly used to treat epilepsy and has also proven effective in treating specific types of cancer. The researchers initially used a combination of parvoviruses and valproic acid to treat tumor cells that had been obtained from cervical and pancreatic carcinomas and raised in the culture dish. In both types of cancer, the drug raised the rate of virus-induced cell death; in some cases, the cancer cells were even completely eliminated."
Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:10 PM

Because this research shows promise focused on brain, cervical, and pancreatic cancer using viral therapy to kill these cancer cells, it may also be useful if studied targeting breast and other types of cancer cells. 

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Ecology: Gene tweaking for conservation - Nature.com

Ecology: Gene tweaking for conservation - Nature.com | Biology 1 | Scoop.it
Ecology: Gene tweaking for conservation Nature.com This form of genetic engineering is probably the least risky of the approaches described here, because it involves the movement of alleles within the same species, without the attendant risks of...
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