Biology
1 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sofia Abuhadba from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

A Bio-Patch Regrows Bone Inside the Body : DNews

A Bio-Patch Regrows Bone Inside the Body : DNews | Biology | Scoop.it
Microscopic particles embedded in DNA insert bone-producing instructions into cells.

-

Researchers from the University of Iowa have developed a remarkable new procedure for regenerating missing or damaged bone. It's called a "bio patch" -- and it works by sending bone-producing instructions directly into cells using microscopic particles embedded with DNA.

In experiments, the gene-encoding patch has already regrown bone fully enough to cover skull wounds in test animals. It has also stimulated new growth in human bone marrow stromal cells. Eventually, the patch could be used to repair birth defects involving missing bone around the head or face. It could also help dentists rebuild bone in areas which provides a concrete-like foundation for implants.


Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sofia Abuhadba
Scoop.it!

Biology: Multiplication and Division - via @9GAGTweets

Biology: Multiplication and Division - via @9GAGTweets | Biology | Scoop.it
Biology: Multiplication and Division - http://t.co/OE2iP45Yj3
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sofia Abuhadba from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

A multifunctional nano carrier to detect, diagnose, and deliver drugs to cancer cells | KurzweilAI

A multifunctional nano carrier to detect, diagnose, and deliver drugs to cancer cells | KurzweilAI | Biology | Scoop.it

A unique nanostructure developed by a team of international researchers* promises improved all-in-one detection, diagnoses, and drug-delivery treatment of cancer cells.

It can carry a variety of cancer-fighting materials on its double-sided (Janus) surface and within its porous interior


Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sofia Abuhadba from Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
Scoop.it!

Bats May Be Carrying the Next SARS Pandemic | Science/AAAS | News

Bats May Be Carrying the Next SARS Pandemic | Science/AAAS | News | Biology | Scoop.it

In November 2002, a deadly new virus emerged suddenly in the south of China. In less than a year, the disease it caused, known as SARS, spread to 33 countries, sickening more than 8000 people and killing more than 700. Then it disappeared. Now, researchers say, they have for the first time isolated a closely related virus from bats in China that can infect human cells. "This shows, that right now in China, there are bats carrying a virus that can directly infect people, and cause another SARS pandemic," says Peter Daszak, one of the authors and president of EcoHealth Alliance in New York City.


Via Torben Barsballe
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sofia Abuhadba from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Plants use fungus to coordinate defenses

Scientists in the UK have shown that plants can communicate with the help of fungal networks.


Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
Jean-Michel Ané's curator insight, November 2, 2013 7:01 PM

Nice movie again... 

Scooped by Sofia Abuhadba
Scoop.it!

Novel genetic patterns may make us rethink biology and individuality

Novel genetic patterns may make us rethink biology and individuality | Biology | Scoop.it
Scientists have made two novel discoveries: 1) a person can have several DNA mutations in parts of their body, with their original DNA in the rest -- resulting in several different genotypes in one individual -- and 2) some of the same genetic...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sofia Abuhadba
Scoop.it!

PrepMeMCATBio - Daily biology quiz questions for the MCAT, brush up for the test! | Wisr

PrepMeMCATBio - Daily biology quiz questions for the MCAT, brush up for the test! | Wisr | Biology | Scoop.it
Wisr teaches anything from Chemistry to Algebra through Twitter/chat/SMS/email. Learn by answering questions in the communication channel where you are most comfortable.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sofia Abuhadba from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Lasers might be the cure for brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

Lasers might be the cure for brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's | Biology | Scoop.it

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, together with researchers at the Polish Wroclaw University of Technology, have made a discovery that may lead to the curing of diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (the so called mad cow disease) through photo therapy.
The researchers discovered that it is possible to distinguish aggregations of the proteins, believed to cause the diseases, from the the well-functioning proteins in the body by using multi-photon laser technique.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sofia Abuhadba from Virology News
Scoop.it!

HIV: Antibodies advance the search for a cure

HIV: Antibodies advance the search for a cure | Biology | Scoop.it
Efforts to make a prophylactic HIV vaccine have identified monoclonal antibodies that potently suppress viral replication. Studies in monkeys show that these reagents effectively treat HIV infection.

Via Ed Rybicki
more...
Ed Rybicki's curator insight, November 2, 2013 1:47 PM

It is devoutly to be wished...but instead of reverse engineering HIV proteins to eleict such antibodies, how about simply using them - via passive immunisation, or use in microbicides, or made via DNA vaccines - to prevent and/or treat HIV infections??

Rescooped by Sofia Abuhadba from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Biology Confronts Data Complexity

Biology Confronts Data Complexity | Biology | Scoop.it

New technologies have launched the life sciences into the age of big data. Biologists must now make sense of their informational windfall.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
Gary Bamford's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:53 AM

The very definition of 'complexity'!

Germán Morales's curator insight, October 22, 2013 11:26 AM

Tratar la vida como un cumulo de datos... qué se yo... estamos yendo a eso.

tatiyana fuentes's curator insight, October 24, 2013 8:49 AM

It was difficult to find sequence the human genome, but now it’s comparatively simple to compare genomes of the microorganisms living in our bodies, the ocean, the soil, and everywhere because of the new technologies. Life scientists are embarking on countless other big data projects, including efforts to analyze the genomes of many cancers, to map the human brain, and to develop better biofuels and other crops. Compared to fields like physics, astronomy and computer science that have been dealing with the challenges of massive datasets for decades, the big data revolution in biology has also been quick, leaving little time to adapt. Biologists must overcome a number of hurdles, from storing and moving data to integrating and analyzing it, which will require a substantial cultural shift.