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Bioinformatics Training
Bioinformatics, blended with education and health sciences subjects
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11 free tools for discovering research | Mendeley Blog

11 free tools for discovering research | Mendeley Blog | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
Finding research is often frustrating. You're always running into paywalls and the interfaces to most library databases look like they were designed sometime back in 1980.
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Annual Bioinformatics Survey Results | Eagle Genomics

Annual Bioinformatics Survey Results | Eagle Genomics | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
Eagle recently completed its second annual bioinformatics survey, intended to monitor trends in the industry and predict its future direction.
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OGT to Host Cancer and Rare Disease Analysis Workshop at ESHG 2012 - SelectScience.net (press release)

OGT to Host Cancer and Rare Disease Analysis Workshop at ESHG 2012 - SelectScience.net (press release) | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
OGT to Host Cancer and Rare Disease Analysis Workshop at ESHG 2012SelectScience.net (press release)The session, entitled “Utilising arrays and next generation sequencing (NGS) to identify causative mutations in cancer and rare disease samples”,...
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Medicare Stops Cognitive Therapy for Patients with Alzheimer's Disease - PR Newswire (press release)

Medicare Stops Cognitive Therapy for Patients with Alzheimer's DiseasePR Newswire (press release)Despite the NIH report, and despite recommendations by organizational advocates for the Alzheimer's patient (AA, AFA, & others) regarding the need for...
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E.O. Wilson at TEDMED 2012: "Think like a poet and work like a bookkeeper"

E.O. Wilson at TEDMED 2012:  "Think like a poet and work like a bookkeeper" | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
Renowned biologist E.O.Wilson offers advice to young scientists, exhorting them to...
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New Breakthrough Ion AmpliSeq(TM) Technology Delivers the Most Rapid and ... - MarketWatch (press release)

New Breakthrough Ion AmpliSeq(TM) Technology Delivers the Most Rapid and ... - MarketWatch (press release) | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
New Breakthrough Ion AmpliSeq(TM) Technology Delivers the Most Rapid and ...MarketWatch (press release)Analyzing these samples using next generation sequencing (NGS) has been difficult, as typically only nanogram amounts of DNA can be isolated, far...
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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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PLoS Pathogens: A New Evolutionary Model for Hepatitis C Virus Chronic Infection

PLoS Pathogens: A New Evolutionary Model for Hepatitis C Virus Chronic Infection | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it

"Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects an estimated 3% of humanity [1] and is a leading global cause of liver disease and liver cancer [2]. Intervention is currently limited by the lack of a vaccine and of universally successful drug treatments. Although several next-generation drugs (e.g., direct-acting protease-inhibitors) are already improving outcomes, a number of factors will affect overall treatment success [3]. Among these, viral genetic variation and the emergence of drug resistance are of major importance."


Via Ed Rybicki
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Foundation Medicine Announces New Data Using Next-Generation Sequencing to ... - MarketWatch (press release)

Foundation Medicine Announces New Data Using Next-Generation Sequencing to ... - MarketWatch (press release) | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
Foundation Medicine Announces New Data Using Next-Generation Sequencing to ...MarketWatch (press release)The studies, being presented this week in an oral and poster session at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO),...
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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from BS2040: Bioinformatics
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Same gene that stunts infants' growth also makes them grow too big: research - Medical Xpress

Same gene that stunts infants' growth also makes them grow too big: research - Medical Xpress | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
Same gene that stunts infants' growth also makes them grow too big: researchMedical XpressPublished in the May 27 edition of Nature Genetics, the UCLA findings could lead to new ways of blocking the rapid cell division that allows tumors to grow...

Via Dr Richard Badge
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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from Big, Big Data
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Text mining: what do publishers have against this hi-tech research tool?

Text mining: what do publishers have against this hi-tech research tool? | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it

Researchers push for end to publishers' default ban on automated computer scanning of tens of thousands of papers


Via Andrew Spong
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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from Technology and Innovation and its impact on Healthcare
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Mary Meeker’s eye-popping annual Internet Trends report hits the web

Mary Meeker’s eye-popping annual Internet Trends report hits the web | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
Mary Meeker, a partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers, has released her latest compilation of eye-popping data concerning trends on the web and in mobile.

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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
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Making Structures with DNA "Building Blocks"

Video

 

by Wyss Institute

 

Researchers at the Wyss Institute have developed a method for building complex nanostructures out of short synthetic strands of DNA.

 


Via Socrates Logos
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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from SOCIAL MEDIA, what we think about!
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How Google & Technology is Changing Your Brain’s Rote Memory (The Google Effect Study)

How Google & Technology is Changing Your Brain’s Rote Memory (The Google Effect Study) | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it

A recent study has confirmed that the search engine Google is changing your brain and altering the way it works, seriously. But then again, this really shouldn’t come as a surprise since any new technology is going to change the way that our neurons fire and brain works. Anyways, a group of people got money for a study called “The Google Effect” led by Betsy Sparrow at Columbia University. Findings from the study led by Betsy were published in the popular journal, “Science.”

 

How is Google changing your brain? What did The Google Effect study find?

 

Contrary to popular myth that using the internet is making people dumber, that wasn’t what the researchers found. What they found was the fact that using the Google search engine causes the brain to reorganize its memories for information. Instead of relying on what is called “Rote memory,” people are using new technology such as their computers and Google to get the job done. In other words, instead of people using their brains directly to pull up information are basically saying, “I can just quick go Google it instead of try to test my memory.”

 

Read more: http://ow.ly/beRij


Via Martin Gysler
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Bioinformatics survey results | Code for Life

Bioinformatics survey results | Code for Life | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it

I  agree with this comment. This survey is very limited in scope and coverage. Results are  dificult to interpret. Still it is quite interesting to see what biased responses from a small number of people can tell about the field.      P. Fernandes

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SC1 Detailed Agenda

SC1 Detailed Agenda | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
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Creation and application of immortalized bait libraries for targeted ... - BioTechniques.com

Creation and application of immortalized bait libraries for targeted ...BioTechniques.comThe introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized research in many areas (1,2), especially affecting our fundamental understanding of the...
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Help with Nextera WGS data - SEQanswers

bioinformatics training for WGS 454 and Illumina, hmmngs, Bioinformatics, 2, 09-21-2011 08:01 AM. Looking for the right WGS simulator, oiiio, Bioinformatics, 3, 06-23-2011 12:33 PM. Celera WGS requires paired data?
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Jonathan Eisen at TEDMED 2012 - Microbiome

Jonathan Eisen at TEDMED  2012  - Microbiome | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it

Not all microbes are pathogens. As Jonathan Eisen of the University of California of Davis points out, the health of our microbiome is vital to protecting us from disease.

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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases: Surveillance of Dengue Fever Virus: A Review of Epidemiological Models and Early Warning Systems

PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases: Surveillance of Dengue Fever Virus: A Review of Epidemiological Models and Early Warning Systems | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it

"Dengue fever affects over a 100 million people annually hence is one of the world's most important vector-borne diseases. The transmission area of this disease continues to expand due to many direct and indirect factors linked to urban sprawl, increased travel and global warming. Current preventative measures include mosquito control programs, yet due to the complex nature of the disease and the increased importation risk along with the lack of efficient prophylactic measures, successful disease control and elimination is not realistic in the foreseeable future. Epidemiological models attempt to predict future outbreaks using information on the risk factors of the disease. Through a systematic literature review, this paper aims at analyzing the different modeling methods and their outputs in terms of acting as an early warning system. We found that many previous studies have not sufficiently accounted for the spatio-temporal features of the disease in the modeling process. Yet with advances in technology, the ability to incorporate such information as well as the socio-environmental aspect allowed for its use as an early warning system, albeit limited geographically to a local scale."

 

Useful paper on modelling virus spread


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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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Hong Kong sees first human bird flu case in 18 months - AFP

Hong Kong sees first human bird flu case in 18 months - AFP | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
AFPHong Kong sees first human bird flu case in 18 monthsAFPBut we still need to go through the whole process of analysing the origin and channel of the infection and have to study the virology of the virus." The H5N1 strain has killed more than 350...

Via Graeme Sutton
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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from Digital Health
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ApriPetit Is A Little Robot That Could Help Elderly With Health & Mood

ApriPetit Is A Little Robot That Could Help Elderly With Health & Mood | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it
Toshiba’s R&D department built ApriPetit as a successor to their larger ApriPoco. This little guy is about six inches tall and follows along to conversations by moving its slug-like body and eyes in ways that resemble proper conversation.
This wee fellow is designed to help older folks with their daily chores. Its eyes are expressive and will follow the user across a room and it can ask and answer simple questions relating to health and mood.

Via Alex Butler
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Partnership With Patients: because patients deserve dignity and respect

Partnership With Patients: because patients deserve dignity and respect | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it

Regina Holliday (@ReginaHolliday) writes:

 

'Partnership with Patients was created in response to Regina Holliday’s experience in attempting to participate in the Partnership for Patients kick-off meeting, a CMS-funded initiative. Regina experience can be read in her post Pecking Order.

 

We ask you to bring your friends. It does not matter if you have been working in this field for years or if you just began to today. We welcome you. We will not exclude because of worries that we may not have enough supplies to share or funding for travel.

 

We will work on our Partnership With Patients Campaign, I invite you to join us. We will create a PEN, a Patient Engagement Network, for we are all patients in the end. We all deserve dignity and respect.

 

And a PEN is really good at writing about injustice and then telling the whole world.'

 

[AS: If this doesn't make sense to you, rethink your definition of what social health means, what it is for, and why and how you are using it.]


Via Andrew Spong
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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from Health Innovation
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"Printing" pharmaceuticals with a 3D printer

"Printing" pharmaceuticals with a 3D printer | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it

A Nature Chemistry paper by researchers from the University of Glasgow describes a process for "printing" pharmaceutical compounds from various feedstocks, and supposes a future in which we have diagnosis/medication manufacturies at home. The process uses an off-the-shelf 3D printer technology to assemble pre-filled "vessels" in ways that create the desired chemical reaction in order to produce medicines. It's a scaled-down version of the industrial process used to manufacture drugs in bulk, and the paper's principal, Prof Lee Cronin, calls it "reactionware." From the BBC:

 

"We can fabricate these reactionware vessels using a 3D printer in a relatively short time. Even the most complicated vessels we've built have only take a few hours.

 

"By making the vessel itself part of the reaction process, the distinction between the reactor and the reaction becomes very hazy. It's a new way for chemists to think, and it gives us very specific control over reactions because we can continually refine the design of our vessels as required.

 

"For example, our initial reactionware designs allowed us to synthesize three previously unreported compounds and dictate the outcome of a fourth reaction solely by altering the chemical composition of the reactor."

 

...Prof Cronin added: "3D printers are becoming increasingly common and affordable. It's entirely possible that, in the future, we could see chemical engineering technology which is prohibitively expensive today filter down to laboratories and small commercial enterprises.

 

"Even more importantly, we could use 3D printers to revolutionise access to health care in the developing world, allowing diagnosis and treatment to happen in a much more efficient and economical way than is possible now.

 

"We could even see 3D printers reach into homes and become fabricators of domestic items, including medications. Perhaps with the introduction of carefully-controlled software 'apps', similar to the ones available from Apple, we could see consumers have access to a personal drug designer they could use at home to create the medication they need."


Via Thibaud Guymard
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Rescooped by Pedro Fernandes from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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Genome and proteome analysis of 7-7-1, a flagellotropic phage infecting Agrobacterium sp H13-3

Genome and proteome analysis of 7-7-1, a flagellotropic phage infecting Agrobacterium sp H13-3 | Bioinformatics Training | Scoop.it

"The flagellotropic phage 7-7-1 infects motile cells of Agrobacterium sp H13-3 by attaching to and traveling along the rotating flagellar filament to the secondary receptor at the base, where it injects its DNA into the host cell."

 

This is an interesting paper, because it describes a phage infecting Agrobacterium - and touches on a subject that has intrigued me for years, which is: How does a phage which attaches to a flagellum, get its genome inside the cell?  This throws some mud onto a previous model, which suggested a passive mode of transport like a well-oiled nut moving towards the head of a bolt, as in this case that would result in transport the other way.  Expect more on this topic!

 

Image sourced from the paper


Via Ed Rybicki
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What do you think is the future of mHealth?

This article is about the future of mobile health, speculating what the pharma and healthcare industries will be like regarding the new technology in 2112.

 

Much as social media has exponentially engulfed and transformed communications over the past few years, mobile technology has even more recently and rapidly exploded across every measurable indicator, ultimately whiplashing back through social media in a manner powerful enough to influence Wall Street’s largest IPO and perhaps engender the oddest mobile/social mashup of them all, a “Facebook Smartphone”.


Since communications, data, and analytics are the cornerstone of medicine, the impact of the mobile industry on healthcare has been even more astonishing. As Leigh Householder recently described, mobile transcends our conventional notions of device, channel, or tool, and instead reflects a confluence of all these concepts into what can only be expressed as a seismic force driving the next evolution in all of our health behaviors.


Physicians recognize and embrace this trend, doubling their use of tablets since 2011. Given such a whirlwind of paradigm shifts and transformation, the world seems like science fiction come to life. So what better way to cap off mobile health month here at pharmaphorum than by enthusiastically and perhaps recklessly speculating on what the future holds for this ‘complex intersection of technology, expectation, and interaction”?


Via nrip
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