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News: Climate change a threat to security, food and humankind - IPCC report (2014)

News: Climate change a threat to security, food and humankind - IPCC report (2014) | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

A United Nations report raised the threat of climate change to a whole new level on Monday, warning of sweeping consequences to life and livelihood. The report from the UN's intergovernmental panel on climate change concluded that climate change was already having effects in real time – melting sea ice and thawing permafrost in the Arctic, killing off coral reefs in the oceans, and leading to heat waves, heavy rains and mega-disasters. And the worst was yet to come. Climate change posed a threat to global food stocks, and to human security, the blockbuster report said.


 

The warning signs about climate change and extreme weather events have been accumulating over time. But this report struck out on relatively new ground by drawing a clear line connecting climate change to food scarcity, and conflict. The report said climate change had already cut into the global food supply. Global crop yields were beginning to decline – especially for wheat – raising doubts as to whether production could keep up with population growth. “It has now become evident in some parts of the world that the green revolution has reached a plateau,” Pachauri said. The future looks even more grim. Under some scenarios, climate change could lead to dramatic drops in global wheat production as well as reductions in maize. "Climate change is acting as a brake. We need yields to grow to meet growing demand, but already climate change is slowing those yields," said Michael Oppenheimer, a Princeton professor and an author of the report.



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WORLDWIDE: Global Oceans Action Summit for Food Security and Blue Growth opens in The Hague

WORLDWIDE: Global Oceans Action Summit for Food Security and Blue Growth opens in The Hague | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The Hague/Rome – Urgent coordinated action is needed to restore the health of the world’s oceans and secure the long-term well-being and food security of a growing global population. That is a key message of an international summit that opens today in The Hague, the Netherlands.

Ministers and senior representatives from governments, the fishing industry, coastal communities, science and civil society are coming together at the Global Oceans Action Summit for Food Security and Blue Growth (22-25 April) which aims to bring global attention and increased investment into addressing the three key threats to ocean health and food security: overfishing, habitat destruction and pollution. The summit will culminate in a high-level roundtable on Thursday 25 April.

“Urgent joint action of the global community is needed to address the threats facing our oceans”, said H.E. Sharon Dijksma, Minister for Agriculture of the Netherlands, which is hosting the summit.

“Local innovations to balance ecology and economy at sea must be identified and put into practice in other regions. The Global Oceans Action Summit in The Hague provides the opportunity to make a difference.”

On average, 17 percent of global animal protein intake comes from fisheries and aquaculture, and demand for fish protein is expected to double in the next 20 years, yet some 28 percent of global stocks are already overfished.

At the same time, climate change is threatening biodiversity, altering habitats and changing the productivity of our fisheries.

“Healthy oceans have a central role to play in solving one of the biggest problems of the 21st century – how to feed 9 billion people by 2050,” said Árni M. Mathiesen, Assistant Director-General for Fisheries and Aquaculture at the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

“However, we need to act now at the speed and scale necessary to meet the challenges we face by joining forces with all stakeholders, fostering partnerships and spurring sustainable growth.

Over 500 delegates are expected to attend the Summit, including more than 60 ministers, CEOs and leaders from civil society.

Hosted by the Government of the Netherlands, the Summit is co-organized by the World Bank, FAO and the governments of Grenada, Indonesia, Mauritius, Norway and the United States of America.

Balancing acts

The Summit will focus on some of the underlying causes that have led to the overfishing, increased marine pollution and loss of critical habitat as well as potential solutions.

This means balancing the demand for growth with the need for conservation of marine areas; addressing illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing in the high seas and within national exclusive economic zones; and ensuring private sector growth does not come at the expense of protecting the livelihoods of local communities.

“Solutions exist that balance the ecological and economic demands on the ocean,” said Juergen Voegele, Director of Agriculture and Environmental Services at the World Bank, a co-organizer of the event.

“We have the opportunity to align all our efforts and bring solutions to scale locally. With public-private partnerships and shared approaches we can restore ocean health and provide food and jobs for communities worldwide.”

In exploring solutions, emphasis will also be placed on the finance mechanisms and governance structures needed to ensure that actions have the impact and longevity to respond to global demands.

Among the approaches discussed, inclusive partnerships that bring together public, private, community and civil society actors will be highlighted.

Blue growth

Coming out of the 2012 Rio+20 Conference, the blue economy comprises the food, jobs and opportunities for development provided by ocean and coastal assets.

Blue growth emphasizes conservation and sustainable management of aquatic resources and equitable benefits to the coastal communities that rely on them.

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Urban backyard food production as a strategy for food security in Melbourne

Urban backyard food production as a strategy for food security in Melbourne | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

My research was about urban food production within 70-km radius of Melbourne CBD. The data collection period ran from July 2012 to July 2013. This was deliberately designed to capture inter-seasonal yield. In all, 15 households took part in the research and each participant contributed 12 weeks’ worth of data.


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The Global State of Agriculture infographic

The Global State of Agriculture infographic | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
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The End of the Line: Where Have All the #Fish Gone? ~ @NatGeo + many more links

The End of the Line: Where Have All the #Fish Gone? ~ @NatGeo + many more links | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The End of the Line is a powerful film about one of the world's most disturbing problems - over-fishing.

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What A Week Of Groceries Looks Like Around The World | Fstoppers

What A Week Of Groceries Looks Like Around The World | Fstoppers | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
It seems as a people, we have a fascination with photographing our food. From Henry's series of riders, to looking on instagram we cant help but document what we consume. Photographer Peter Menzel started this intriguing series of one weeks of groceries from around the world, taking traditional food photography to a much larger scale.

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The World Just Had Its Hottest June On Record

The World Just Had Its Hottest June On Record | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — The globe is on a hot streak, setting a heat record in June. That's after the world broke a record in May.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Monday that last month's average global te...

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Per calorie, beef requires more than 100 times as much land as rice and potatoes

Per calorie, beef requires more than 100 times as much land as rice and potatoes | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
A paper published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences calculates the amount of natural resources used in producing various animal products. The authors write that so far, there have not been detailed, reliable estimates of the burden that different types of animal products impose on the natural environment. Know […]

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 23, 2014 9:03 PM

If we know something, will it change our behavior.

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Proposal for Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) | End Poverty 2015

Proposal for Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) | End Poverty 2015 | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Take a look at the latest proposal for the Sustainable Development Goals to replace the Millennium Development Goals.


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The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

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Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 2014 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

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Locally sourced food, an answer to sustainable living.

Locally sourced food, an answer to sustainable living. | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The Open Food Network wants to change the way consumers connect with their food.


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oyndrila's curator insight, July 24, 2014 11:29 AM

An effective network will help us access locally grown food and create sustainable food systems.

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This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa

This Awesome Interactive Map Will Make You Think Twice About Africa | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
They say a picture is worth a thousand words. This graph is worth as many as you can take out of it.

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Why Is Chocolate Getting So Expensive?

Why Is Chocolate Getting So Expensive? | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Sure, most food is expensive these days, but chocolate is on a tear. On Thursday, Mars, the company behind the likes of M&M's and 3 Musketeers, said it was raising prices for chocolate products in the U.S.

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North Africa: Water Scarcity Among Critical Food Security Issues in Near East and North Africa - UN

North Africa: Water Scarcity Among Critical Food Security Issues in Near East and North Africa - UN | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) today warned that water scarcity is one of the most urgent food security issues facing countries of the Near East and North Africa, with fresh water availability in the region expected to drop by 50 per cent by 2050."

 


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WORLDWIDE: Consultation - The Role of Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture for Food Security and Nutrition

WORLDWIDE: Consultation - The Role of Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture for Food Security and Nutrition | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

HLPE consultation on the V0 draft of the Report: The Role of Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture for Food Security and Nutrition.

until 15th December 2013

 

In November 2012, the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) requested the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE) to conduct a study on The Role of Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture for food security and nutrition.

 

Taking into account the results of the scoping consultation, the HLPE intends to assess the importance and relevance of Fisheries and Aquaculture for Food Security and nutrition as well as the current challenges faced by Fisheries and Aquaculture in relation to Food Security, pointing out changes going on, including overexploitation of fish stocks and the boom of aquaculture, in order to better understand these changes and to maximize the positive effects of them.

 

Final findings of the study will feed into CFS 41 Plenary session on policy convergence (October 2014).

 

As part of the process of elaboration of its reports, the HLPE now seeks inputs, suggestions, comments on the present V0 draft.

 

This e-consultation will be used by the HLPE to further elaborate the report, which will then be submitted to external expert review, before finalization and approval by the HLPE Steering Committee.

 

HLPE V0 drafts are deliberately presented – with their range of imperfections – early enough in the process, at a work-in-progress stage, when sufficient time remains to give proper consideration feedback received so that it can be really useful and play a real role in the elaboration of the report. It is a key part of the scientific dialogue between the HLPE Project team and Steering Committee with the rest of the knowledge community.

 

In particular, the HLPE would welcome comments and evidence based suggestions, references, examples, etc. on policy aspects, from an evidence-based perspective, on what can be done to improve the contributions of fisheries and aquaculture to improve food security and nutrition, now and in the future, in various contexts.

 

It is a fact: fish is nutritionally rich (in particular in bioavailable calcium, iron, zinc, and vitamin A); and fish (either produced through fish-farming activity or caught from wild stocks through fisheries) is used in many developing countries as a primary source of animal protein.

 

The latest estimate by the FAO suggests for instance that in 2009, fish accounted for 17% of the global population’s intake of animal protein and 6.5% of all protein consumed. Globally, fish provides about 3.0 billion people with almost 20 percent of their average per capita intake of animal protein, and 4.3 billion people with about 15 percent of such protein (FAO 2012).

 

Yet, fisheries and aquaculture are absent from most global reports on food and food insecurity (e.g., FAO SOFA and the FAO food insecurity reports) and, with some few exceptions, fish has so far been ignored in the international debate on food security and nutrition. At the same time, although the fisheries literature recognizes the importance of fish in relation to food security and nutrition, the analysis goes rarely beyond the simple adage stating that: “Fish is a rich food for the poor”.

 

There is an urgent need to go beyond this adage and establish more rigorously the link between fish ad food security and nutrition. The key-question that this study will aim to address is: “recognizing the well-established importance of fish to food security and nutrition, what should be done to maintain or even enhance this contribution now and in the long term, given the challenges that both fisheries and aquaculture sectors are facing in terms of their own environmental sustainability and governance, and the external economic and demographic transitions that they have to respond to?”

 

In order to address this overarching question, several more specific interrogations may be considered:

 

Respective contribution of fisheries and aquaculture to food security and nutrition:

 

How and to what extent do fisheries and aquaculture contribute to food security - through which impact pathways? What is the evidence available to present fisheries and aquaculture as key ways for improving the food security of targeted populations?

 

Women and food security:

 

What is the specific role of women in enhancing food security in fisheries and aquaculture sectors? What are the threats and barriers to this specific role and why and how should this role be strengthened?

 

Sectorial trade-offs and food security:

 

Are there any trade-offs between the sectors’ contributions at different levels or between different groups? In other words, is it possible that enhancing food security at one level (or for one specific target group, e.g. urban consumers) reduces food security at another level (or for another specific group, e.g. fishers/producers)? As part of this issue, what is the overall contribution of international fish trade on food security?

 

Environmental sustainability of fisheries and aquaculture:

 

Beyond an obvious long-term dependence, what is the relationship (trade-offs; synergies) between resource conservation and food security? In particular what are the short- and medium-term impacts of the large number of conservation interventions (e.g. marine protected areas) that have been recently established, on the local populations dependent on small-scale fisheries?

 

Governance and food security:

 

What are the effects of the various management and governance reforms (e.g. co-management programmes) currently implemented at national level throughout the world’s fisheries, on food security? At the international level what is the role and impact of recent global programmes and campaigns such as the “International Plan of Action to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing (IPOA-IUU)”, or the implementation of BMPs (Best Management Practices) in aquaculture on food security?

 

 

Fisheries and aquaculture interaction:

 

Are there any trade-offs between aquaculture and fisheries in relation food security? In particular is the use of fish meal (to feed farmed fish) a threat to human food security?

 

The future of fisheries and aquaculture in the context of foods security:

 

What future role fisheries and aquaculture will be able to play in the context of the combined impact of demographic transition (increased population and increased living standard) and climate change (likely decrease in world agriculture production capacity)?

 

We thank in advance all the contributors for being kind enough to read and comment on this early version of our report. We look forward for a rich and fruitful consultation.

 

The HLPE Project Team and Steering Committee

 

Discussion documents

V.0 draft of the HLPE study: http://www.fao.org/fsnforum/cfs-hlpe/sites/cfs-hlpe/files/files/Fisheries%20and%20Aquaculture/HLPE-Fisheries_and_Aquaculture_Draft-V0_18-Nov-2013.pdf

 

Contributions Received (DOC): http://www.fao.org/fsnforum/cfs-hlpe/sites/cfs-hlpe/files/files/Fisheries%20and%20Aquaculture/PROCEEDINGS_Fisheries_Aquaculture_v0.docx

 

Topic (PDF): http://www.fao.org/fsnforum/cfs-hlpe/sites/cfs-hlpe/files/files/Fisheries%20and%20Aquaculture/topic_en_fisheries-aquaculture_v0.pdf

 

How to participate

 

To participate in a consultation, please fill the form below on the discussion page or send an email (fsn-moderator@fao.org; cfs-hlpe@fao.org).

 

We accept comments in English, French and Spanish.

 

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How Mekong dams could affect Cambodia's food security

How Mekong dams could affect Cambodia's food security | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
How will a population so dependent on rivers and lakes stay afloat when faced with a series of mega-dam projects? (RT @sonnylebythebay: #Cambodia is renowned for its fish. But for how much longer?

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Watch this to see what is happening to all the fish!

Watch this to see what is happening to all the fish! | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Watch this to see what is happening to all the fish!
The End of the Line :: The Film
endoftheline.com
Imagine an ocean without fish. Imagine your meals without seafood. Imagine the global consequences.

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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
  If you're a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this c...

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 22, 2014 6:42 PM

Several of these are very telling

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:03 PM

Unit 1

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The New Scramble for Africa

The New Scramble for Africa | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Thought colonialism was over? Our new interactive infographic shows how corporations like Monsanto are scrambling to carve up Africa's food system: http://wdm.li/newscramble

Via Allison Anthony, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Map - The children killed in the current Gaza strip conflict

Map - The children killed in the current Gaza strip conflict | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Graphic: More children than Palestinian fighters are being killed in the offensive on Gaza, according to the UN. The name, age, sex and location of 132 of the 155 Palestinian children killed have been collected by the Al Mezan Centre for Human Rights

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Mesmerizing Photos of People Lying in a Week’s Worth of Their Trash 

Mesmerizing Photos of People Lying in a Week’s Worth of Their Trash  | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The United States has a trash problem. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the average American produces more than 4 pounds of garbage per day. That’s more than double the amount produced in 1960, and it’s 50 percent more than the amount produced by Western Europeans. In January, photographer Gregg Segal decided to put...

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Australia's wine industry

Australia's wine industry | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

In just 200 years, Australia's wine industry has grown from a few small plantings to an industry renowned throughout the world for quality, innovation and depth. In fact, Australia is consistently one of the top ten wine producing countries in the world and is one of the few countries that produces every one of the major wine styles.


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dilaycock's curator insight, July 24, 2014 5:36 AM

Useful overview from the Australian Government regarding the development of Australia's wine industry.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:33 PM

Useful overview from the Australian Government regarding the development of Australia's wine industry.

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Predictions for urban Africa and Asia

Predictions for urban Africa and Asia | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
UN report predicts that two-thirds of the world's population will live in cities by 2050

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oyndrila's curator insight, July 24, 2014 11:22 AM

Urban settlements of Africa and Asia need to work towards meeting the challenges of the future.

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ABC Splash ­ ConCensus

ABC Splash ­ ConCensus | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

Thanks tpBring Australian statistics to life with ConCensus - a data visualisation game where students can interact with real data from the 2011 ABS Census.


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dilaycock's curator insight, July 26, 2014 1:15 AM

Thanks to @audrey_nay for this resource.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:26 PM

Interesting graphs, especially to compare home town to state or country

Julie Wicks's curator insight, July 31, 2014 12:21 AM

Useful for Year 7 Place and Liveability. Data can be exported into excel for graphing. 

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Infographic - Mali: 1.5 million in need of food assistance

Infographic - Mali: 1.5 million in need of food assistance | The Fascinating Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

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