bio-based chemicals
44 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Céline Baguenard
Scoop.it!

This scientist makes ears out of apples

This scientist makes ears out of apples | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
TED Fellow Andrew Pelling is a biohacker, and nature is his hardware. His favorite materials are the simplest ones (and oftentimes he finds them in the garbage).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Céline Baguenard
Scoop.it!

Carlsberg's Circular Community Unveils Newest Green Fiber Bottle Design | Sustainable Brands

Carlsberg's Circular Community Unveils Newest Green Fiber Bottle Design | Sustainable Brands | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
As part of the work of the Carlsberg Circular Community, Carlsberg kicked off the development project in 2015 with Danish packaging company EcoXpac to develop a beer bottle made from sustainably sourced wood fiber.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Céline Baguenard
Scoop.it!

The year of bio-based packaging

The year of bio-based packaging | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
Derived from renewable materials such as wood fiber from trees or plastic from sugarcane, bio-based packaging materials offer great opportunity for food and beverage companies.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Céline Baguenard from ITERG - Chimie verte
Scoop.it!

Logos Technologies launches rhamnolipid surfactants

Logos Technologies launches rhamnolipid surfactants | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
The blog has covered rhamnolipids in the past but so far the last information I got was in 2012 when a company called AGAE Technologies shipped its first laboratory research-grade rhamnolipid. AGAE has licensed this biosurfactant technology from the Oregon State University. For those who are not familiar with rhamnolipid, it can be produced by fermenting a C18 fatty acid source using a certain bacteria and mannosylerythritol lipids, which can be produced via microbial conversion of glycerin.

Via ITERG - Expertise Lipides
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Céline Baguenard from Matériaux bio-sourcés - chimie verte
Scoop.it!

Des polymères aromatiques à base de lignine et d’huiles végétales

Des polymères aromatiques à base de lignine et d’huiles végétales | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it

Il s’agit de polymères aromatiques obtenus par l’association de deux sources de biomasses différentes et disponibles en très grande quantité : la lignine, un co-produit aromatique et peu valorisé du bois, et des acides gras qui forment de longues chaines aliphatiques et sont obtenus par hydrolyse et fractionnement d’huiles végétales.


Via ITERG - Expertise Lipides, FCBA
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Céline Baguenard
Scoop.it!

API Unveils Renewably-sourced Raw Materials-based APIGO BIO TPO Compounds

API Unveils Renewably-sourced Raw Materials-based APIGO BIO TPO Compounds | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
API SpA launches APIGO BIO, a family of olefin (TPO) based compounds containing raw materials from renewable sources.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Céline Baguenard from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Bio-based solar cell

Bio-based solar cell | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
Researchers generate electricity rather than biomass with photosynthetic proteins.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Céline Baguenard from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
Scoop.it!

Super-microbes engineered to solve world environmental problems | ScienceBlog.com

Super-microbes engineered to solve world environmental problems | ScienceBlog.com | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
Environmental problems, such as depleting natural resources, highlight the need to establish a renewable chemical industry.

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Céline Baguenard
Scoop.it!

New bio-materials offer performance edge over petro-based products

New bio-materials offer performance edge over petro-based products | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
Read more about New bio-materials offer performance edge over petro-based products on Business Standard.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Céline Baguenard from 3D Printing and Fabbing
Scoop.it!

5 Major Developments That 3D Printing Continues To Make In The Field Of Medical | Articles | Chief Technology Officer

5 Major Developments That 3D Printing Continues To Make In The Field Of Medical | Articles | Chief Technology Officer | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
3D printing technology in medicine has led to the improvement in a provision of medical transplant services for almost all the organs of the human body
Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Céline Baguenard
Scoop.it!

How to overcome 4 major hurdles to use more renewable resources

How to overcome 4 major hurdles to use more renewable resources | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
Using renewable resources to make and package food and beverages is good for more than just the environment – it also is good for business, as long as companies can overcome four major hurdles, according to new research from Tetra...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Céline Baguenard from Matériaux bio-sourcés - chimie verte
Scoop.it!

Les matériaux biosourcés, une filière pleine de promesses - Batiactu

Les matériaux biosourcés, une filière pleine de promesses - Batiactu | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
Issus de la biomasse mais également d'éco-matériaux comme la terre crue ou la pierre, les matériaux de construction biosourcés souffrent d'une image encore floue. Pourtant ils connaissent un véritable engouement et sortent aujourd'hui du domaine expérimental pour entrer dans celui de la grande échelle. Plusieurs spécialistes réunis dans le cadre d'Innovative Building Expo donnent leur point de vue.

Via FCBA Vicky
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Céline Baguenard from Market Reports
Scoop.it!

Global Nanocellulose Industry Analysis 2024 New Research Study Available at MarketReportsOnline

The commericial development of nanocellulose over the last few years has mainly been driven by the ever-increasing prices of petroleum and the high-energy intensity in production of chemicals and synthetic polymers. Today there is a substantial amount of research on nanostructured cellulose, and commercial development is now underway with some very promising applications. Utilizing the appropriate conversion and extraction technologies as well as modification and characterization, nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), micro/nanofibrillar cellulose (MFC/NFC) and bacterial cellulose (BC) can be integrated into bio-based products.

 

Their use in novel materials and various applications potentially has substantial environmental and economic benefits. Nanocellulose can be produced from several raw materials and applying various pre-treatments and has great potential as a strength enhancer in paper, as additives in composites, in emulsions, as oxygen barriers for food packaging and in biomedical devices.

 

Purchase a copy of this report @ http://www.marketreportsonline.com/contacts/purchase.php?name=317452.

 

Nanocellulose is also being developed for novel use in applications ranging from scaffolds in tissue engineering, artificial skin and cartilage, wound healing and vessel substitutes to biodegradable food packaging. Applications in polymer reinforcement and anti-microbial films will be hitting the market soon. FP Innovations estimates the market to be worth $250 million in North America by 2020.

This fully updated and revised report includes:

Technology description and production methodsMarket structure, supply chain, patenting and publicationsProduction volumes, total, forecasted and by producerMarkets for nanocellulose, including composites, electronics, construction, paper and pulp, filtration, medicine and life sciences, paints, films, coatings, rheological modifiers, aerogels and oil industryCommercialization timelines to 2020, by marketProducer, research centre and application developer profiles

Complete report available @ http://www.marketreportsonline.com/317452.html.

 

Major points from Table of Contents (http://www.marketreportsonline.com/317452-toc.html ) are listed below:

 

Table 1: Nanocellulose production capactities, tons per year, all types, forecast from 2009 to 2020
Table 2: Properties of cellulose nanofibrils relative to metallic and polymeric materials
Table 3: Nanocellulose properties and applications thereof
Table 4: Types of nanocellulose Table 5: Nanocellulose nanocrystal sources and scale
Table 6: Safety of Micro/Nanofibrillated cellulose
Table 7: Nanocellulose producers and production capacity 2013 (Current and projected)
Table 8: Specialty Cellulose Pulp Capacity-000s tons per year
Table 9: Nanocellulose production capactities, tons per year, all types, forecast from 2009 to 2020
Table 10: Published patent publications for nanocellulose, 1997-2013
Table 11: Research publications on nanocellulose materials and composites, 1996-2013
Table 12: Nanocellulose patents by field of application to 2013
Table 13: Nanocellulose patents by organisation
Table 14: Nanocellulose market supply chain
Table 15: Limitations of nanocellulose in the development of polymer nanocomposites

 

Related Reports on Chemicals Market:

 

Global Polysilicon Market Report: 2014 Edition (http://www.marketreportsonline.com/328148.html) Polycrystallion silicon, commonly known as polysilicon, is a hyper-pure form of silicon. It is classified on the basis of varying purity levels into three broad categories: Electronic-grade Silicon (9N), Medium-grade Silicon (6-7N), and Upgraded Metallurgical-grade Silicon (>5N).

 

Graphene: The Global Market to 2024 (http://www.marketreportsonline.com/272002.html) The global market for graphene continues to grow, with weekly technology and production breakthroughs, new investment and public listings of graphene producers. Driven by demand from markets where advanced materials are required, graphene promises to outstrip all current nanomaterials, especially in electronics and energy storage applications.

 

Global Paints and Coatings Market Report: 2014 Edition (http://www.marketreportsonline.com/325766.html) Paints and coatings market is highly correlated with various end-user sectors like housing, construction, automotive, furniture, and packaging. The global market for paints and coating experienced a healthy growth in 2013 on account of rising construction projects, increase in housing starts, resuming consumer confidence and improvement in industrial production worldwide.

 

About Us:

MarketReportsOnline.com is an online database of regional industry research reports, company profiles and SWOT analysis studies for multiple industries, organizations and market segments. Our sales and research experts offer 24 X 7 support to our customers through phone and email communication. Not limited to the chemicals industry, MarketReportsOnline.com offers research studies on agriculture, travel & hospitality, food and beverages, energy and power, environment, consumer goods, retail, agriculture, healthcare, pharmaceuticals, semiconductor and electronics, advanced materials, medical devices and much more.

 

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/global-industry-for/nanocellulose-market-2024/prweb11863581.html.

 

 


Via RahulK
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Céline Baguenard
Scoop.it!

Biobased Functional Resins and Thermoset Materials with Excellent Mechanical Properties

This portfolio of technologies overcomes some of the challenges in current approaches to bio-based materials, especially those based on vegetable oils, where...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Céline Baguenard from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

3D Printing: The Greener Choice

3D Printing: The Greener Choice | bio-based chemicals | Scoop.it
It takes less energy—and thus releases less carbon dioxide—to make stuff at home with a 3D printer than to manufacture it overseas and ship it to the US.

 

3D printing isn’t just cheaper, it’s also greener, says Michigan Technological University’s Joshua Pearce. Even Pearce, an aficionado of the make-it-yourself-and-save technology, was surprised at his study’s results. It showed that making stuff on a 3D printer uses less energy—and therefore releases less carbon dioxide—than producing it en masse in a factory and shipping it to a warehouse.

 

Most 3D printers for home use, like the RepRap used in this study, are about the size of microwave ovens. They work by melting filament, usually plastic, and depositing it layer by layer in a specific pattern. Free designs for thousands of products are available from outlets like Thingiverse.com.

 

Common sense would suggest that mass-producing plastic widgets would take less energy per unit than making them one at a time on a 3D printer. Or, as Pearce says, “It’s more efficient to melt things in a cauldron than in a test tube.” However, his group found it’s actually greener to make stuff at home.

 

They conducted life cycle impact analyses on three products: an orange juicer, a children’s building block and a waterspout. The cradle-to-gate analysis of energy use went from raw material extraction to one of two endpoints: entry into the US for an item manufactured overseas or printing it a home on a 3D printer.

Pearce’s group found that making the items on a basic 3D printer took from 41 percent to 64 percent less energy than making them in a factory and shipping them to the US.

 

Some of the savings come from using less raw material. “Children’s blocks are normally made of solid wood or plastic,” said Pearce, an associate professor of materials science and engineering/electrical and computer engineering. 3D printed blocks can be made partially or even completely hollow, requiring much less plastic.

 

Pearce’s team ran their analysis with two common types of plastic filament used in 3D printing, including polylactic acid (PLA). PLA is made from renewable resources, such as cornstarch, making it a greener alternative to petroleum-based plastics. The team also did a separate analysis on products made using solar-powered 3D printers, which drove down the environmental impact even further.

 

“The bottom line is, we can get substantial reductions in energy and CO2 emissions from making things at home,” Pearce said. “And the home manufacturer would be motivated to do the right thing and use less energy, because it costs so much less to make things on a 3D printer than to buy them off the shelf or on the Internet.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.