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Career as a Language Translator | ThinkVidya.com

Career as a Language Translator | ThinkVidya.com | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it
In today’s era of globalization, English as the primary official language has lost much of its sheen. Regional languages are much in demand and

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, January 28, 2014 4:59 PM
Importance of a Language Translator

A language translator has a very important role to play in the domain he/she works. Most importantly, the translators are employed in scenarios where they have to act as an interpreter translating orally.

One critical example of such translators or interpreters at work can be cited of scenarios when they are employed in important United Nations conventions where important dignitaries from around the world have come together to share their views on any topic or idea.

Translators have an important role to play in print and electronic media too, as they work with printed documents and recordings which have to be translated into other languages.

Tasks and Responsibilities of a Language Translator

A language translator is expected to play a multifarious role in managing the affairs of the company or the organization for which the translator is working.

However, like any other profession, a translator is assigned certain specific tasks and responsibilities. Here are some of them:

 
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Can a First Language be Totally Forgotten?

Can a First Language be Totally Forgotten? | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it
Does a first language lost in childhood leave a trace? (Can a First #Language be Totally Forgotten?

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The 21st-Century Digital Learner

The 21st-Century Digital Learner | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it

After hosting dozens of these conversations, I realize one thing: We just don't listen enough to our students. The tradition in education has been not to ask the students what they think or want, but rather for adult educators to design the system and curriculum by themselves, using their "superior" knowledge and experience.


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Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 24, 2013 5:27 PM

Just as speaking is the outcome of listening, so writing is the outcome of reading, not the other way round. Listening to the student should also include "listening" to their writing. ie., analyse what they are saying and how they are doing it.  When students evaluate their own work, the teacher should listen and guide them to ways of improving it, whether it be punctuation, paragraphing, spelling, or word or subject knowledge.  This is how we bring students on board and empower them to learn. 

Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:49 PM

Listening to students has two aspects; listening to what they say orally, and 'listening' to their writing which is only another way of talking, only through a code. Just as learning to speak is tied closely to listening to what is said and being exposed to words that help one to think better, so writing is the same  and relies on reading "or listening" to what others say and how they say it to express clear meaning. The two subjects, reading and writing, are closlely intertwined yet we compartmentalize them in the literacy curriculum. An example of adults thinking they know what is best for children.  

Nuno Ricardo Oliveira's curator insight, December 28, 2013 11:53 AM

The 21st-Century Digital Learner

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Questions about Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills and Cognitive Language Proficiency

Questions about Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills and Cognitive Language Proficiency | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it

In the field of bilingual education, the concepts of Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP), first proposed by Jim Cummins in 1984, are fundamental in shedding some light on the development of language proficiency by immigrant students. In the author’s words ‘BICS refers to conversational fluency in a language while CALP refers to students’ ability to understand and express, in both oral and written modes, concepts and ideas that are relevant to success in school’ (Cummins 2008: 108).


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Cognition and behavior: Bilingualism aids people with autism —

Cognition and behavior: Bilingualism aids people with autism — | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it

Cognition and behavior: Bilingualism aids people with autism
E-mail Print Share This Jessica Wright
2 October 2012

A gesture life: Bilingual children are better at nonverbal communication than are those who speak only one language.

Being fluent in both English and Spanish may boost the use of communicative gestures in children with autism, according to a study published 1 August in the Journal of Child Neurology1.

It’s well established that bilingualism has many cognitive benefits. Even among children with autism, two studies published last year showed that those who are bilingual score similarly on language and vocabulary tests to those who speak only one language.

Still, because language difficulties often accompany autism, some clinicians hold that bilingualism is not advisable for children with the disorder.

In the new study, researchers looked at the medical records of children under 3 years of age with autism who attended the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, which is affiliated with the Albert Einstein Medical Center in New York. The children were diagnosed based on criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale.

The 40 children who know both Spanish and English spoke and understood language as well as did the 40 children who only speak English, the study found.

Studies have shown that toddlers with autism are less likely than controls to use gestures when communicating. Researchers consider gestures such as pointing to be a component of joint attention, which is the ability to engage or follow others’ attention. Teaching joint attention skills to children with autism has been shown to improve their language ability later in life.

In the new study, about half of the bilingual children with autism communicated using gestures, compared with one-quarter of the monolingual children. The bilingual children were also more likely than the monolingual children to lead their caregiver to an object and to make vocalizations, such as cooing, the researchers found.


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Shel Spaulding-Moore's curator insight, April 3, 2013 9:03 PM

This is very interesting.  I wonder if it has something to do with working more of the brain harder - kind of like bilateral functions to stimulate both sides of the brian.

Alexandra Strickland's curator insight, September 12, 2013 7:12 AM

Very interesting especially for our bilingual families!

Ollin Ollin's comment, March 5, 2014 11:09 PM
This article deflates the idea that multilingualism contributes to language deficiencies however the problem persists that it is very hard to convince families with a child with a severe delay speaking one language that learning another is not an added challenge/stress.
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Bilinguals have a higher level of mental flexibility

Bilinguals have a higher level of mental flexibility | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it
Penn State researchers believe bilingualism strengthens the 'mental muscle', benefiting those such as French speaker Bradley Cooper (pictured).

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Estelblau's curator insight, September 13, 2013 4:49 AM

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Patricia Moles's curator insight, September 20, 2013 11:55 AM

Hacer trabajar el cerebro, nunca es malo

Ivana Lasich's curator insight, January 24, 2014 2:45 AM

The concept that both languages for individuals who are bilingual are 'active' at the same time ("whether or not they are consciously using them") is interesting. 

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Lost in translation: Crime and language barriers - WNCT

Lost in translation: Crime and language barriers - WNCT | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it

Lost in translation: Crime and language barriers WNCT Robbers break into a Pitt County home and threaten four migrant workers with a gun and a knife. It happened Monday night near Falkland in Pitt County.


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Lost in Translation: Exploring the Connection Between Language and Thought

Lost in Translation: Exploring the Connection Between Language and Thought | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it
We don’t shape language, language shapes us. (Lost in Translation: Exploring the Connection Between Language and Thought http://t.co/Sd4WUd067V)

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Do Different Languages Confer Different Personalities?

Do Different Languages Confer Different Personalities? | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it

LAST week, Johnson took a look at some of the advantages of bilingualism. These include better performance at tasks involving "executive function" (which involve the brain's ability to plan and prioritise), better defence against dementia in old age and—the obvious—the ability to speak a second language. One purported advantage was not mentioned, though. Many multilinguals report different personalities, or even different worldviews, when they speak their different languages.

It’s an exciting notion, the idea that one’s very self could be broadened by the mastery of two or more languages. In obvious ways (exposure to new friends, literature and so forth) the self really is broadened. Yet it is different to claim—as many people do—to have a different personality when using a different language. A former Economist colleague, for example, reported being ruder in Hebrew than in English. So what is going on here?


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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, December 3, 2013 3:36 AM

I guess it is more about being better equipped for life. There is a belief that those who know two or more languages are better equipped for life. It is not that they are more intelligent, rather it is about having a good social aptitude,  and being better communicators!

Irvin Sierra's curator insight, November 12, 2014 10:33 PM

This article relates to the subject of language that we are looking at in class because it conveys if different languages mean different personalities. We were talking basically about this last class where they're some words in Spanish that you wont be able to translate into English. It doesn't mean that people have different personalities it just means that people will be more comfortable with their first language rather than their second language. Language does not reflect on you by your personality but more as your background. 

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Bilingual Speakers Develop Mental Flexibility

Bilingual Speakers Develop Mental Flexibility | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it
Researchers are learning that the benefits of being bilingual extend well beyond enhanced communication capabilities.

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Ashlyn Kristine Brundy's comment, March 7, 2014 10:16 AM
This is a great article. Not only do bilinguals increase their cognitive skills, they have the ability to switch from the two languages and are able to achieve mental flexibility.
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January Carnival: It's time for an injection of ... - Multilingual Mama

January Carnival: It's time for an injection of ... - Multilingual Mama | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it
raising multilingual kids in a diverse world. Search ... Annabelle from Gato & Canard ponders multilingual identities and how where you are born is not automatically where you are from. In her post Code Switching and Sign ...

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The Benefits of Bilingualism

The Benefits of Bilingualism | Bilingüismo | Scoop.it
Being bilingual makes you smarter and can have a profound effect on your brain.

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Ashlyn Kristine Brundy's comment, February 4, 2014 2:38 PM
It is very interesting that bilinguals’s brains are always active. It gives the brain a challenge to identify what language to use, and when you are speaking one language, the brain is also processing the second language. I also thought it was very interesting to see that bilinguals are better at performing tasks and that they are more efficient in their thought process and actions than monolinguals. This is a great article.