Bilingual Education
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Dual-language immersion: Dual-language immersion programs are the new face of bilingual education

In a Glendale public school classroom, the immigrant's daughter uses no English as she conjugates verbs and writes sentences about cats. More than a decade after California voters eliminated most...
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I wanted to include individual case studies in my content curation on Bilingual Education in order to move beyond presenting a newspaper based solely on ideologies and postulations. This article from the Los Angeles Times discusses public school systems in California that have implemented dual-language immersion programs, a form of bilingual eduation. The report claims that about one-quarter of California’s school-age populace are English Language Learners, which is why it is no surprise that bilingual education is on the rise in this state specifically. The Glendale Unified School District has become one of America’s leading lab rats in the execution of bilingual education, as they offer programs in a plethora of languages. What researchers and the local communities have found is an overwhelming social and academic success amongst the student bodies as a result of bilingual education. The report mentions that much of this feat is founded in California’s bilingual education’s emphasis on immersion, combining native English speakers with ELL’s instead of quarantining them in special classrooms. This made me reflect on my own education and the ethnic dynamics within my schools. As early as I can remember, ELL students in my classes were isolated from much of my schools’ lessons and activities. As a result, grades became segregated pockets of separate ethnicities and backgrounds. I rarely interacted with ELL students because they were not in my classes or activities. Consequently, this article made me wonder how this immersion process would have affected the social and academic structuring of my personal schooling. I now feel that bilingual education could oppose the silencing of non-English languages, in favor of celebrating different backgrounds and additionally absorbing them into the classroom and curriculum. Further, the article considers Glendale students’ achievements in reading as a result of bilingual education, implying that the dual-language programs increase language fluency and comprehension. This notion made me believe that language performance is key to academic success, and bilingual education is a superior route to achievement of this success. Overall, this content confirmed my perspective that bilingual education has a variety of benefits for not only the individual student, but also the student population as a whole. By providing observable evidence of an individual school system, I can now develop this perspective even further. 

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The Advantages of Bilingual Education | BlogLet.com

The Advantages of Bilingual Education | BlogLet.com | Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
Bilingual education is beneficial to all children. It develops their cognitive skills and it allows all of them to have equal chances in life.
Elizabeth Barnett's insight:

As part of my content curation on Bilingual Education, I thought it important to find an article that provides clarity on some of the main criticisms of its implementation in the American school system. I really enjoyed how this article addresses a common concern for bilingual education: that it will confuse the children. I have to admit that this was a concern of mine as well, for learning a new language can be difficult and overwhelming and therefore bilingual education could be puzzling to infuse in the classroom. In my personal experience in school I had no exposure to a bilingual education. English was the only language ever used or allowed in all of my classes besides completely isolated classes teaching a second language (specifically Spanish or French). Therefore I was curious as to whether bilingual education would confound communication or knowledge retention in the classroom. However, this article discusses the "unlimited capacity" children have for learning. In fact, the article mentions that this capacity is much stronger than that of adults. Further, instead of hindering knowledge capabilities, this content offers the notion that bilingual education would encourage applicable logic instead of rote memorization. In an ever-expanding 21st century globalized society, I feel that learning logic strategies is pertinent in schools in order to increase the potential for post-graduation life. In this sense, this report challenged my perspective that bilingual education would foster academic confusion by providing ideas on its promising benefits for students. Overall, this article impacted my developing perspective by asserting that children do have the emotional, mental and cognitive competence to not only participate in a bilingual education, but also heavily profit from it. Perhaps in this argument against bilingual education we are drastically undermining children's ability to process multiple facets of education within the classroom. 

 

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Center for Applied Second Language Studies: All Students Benefit from Bilingual Education

Center for Applied Second Language Studies: All Students Benefit from Bilingual Education | Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
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In an educational society that (sadly) largely focuses on standardized test scores, I wanted to see how bilingual education would affect those test scores and overall academic success as part of my content curation. This article from Language Magazine explored the results of a study published in the Journal of Public Economics: the findings displayed that Texas elementary school students who are native English speakers performed much better on state math and reading tests when they were in classes that implement bilingual education programs. Often we talk about bilingual education in the context of benefitting the bilingual student, but I found it important that this post discusses that bilingual education also assists and adds to the education of those students whose first language is English. Although this article mostly provides the raw evidence and not the reasoning behind it, it got me thinking about the impact bilingual education could have on all students, not just ELL students. I would like to take this opportunity to expand on the article’s thought that bilingual education caters to the needs of both ELL’s and English proficient students. Perhaps the reason that bilingual education produced higher test scores was that it offered both sets of students a setting for enhanced learning. The Texas schools discussed in the article engaged in bilingual academic programs in which Spanish-speaking students received specific bilingual education in an alternate setting. I’m not sure that separating Spanish-speaking students is the answer to promoting bilingual education; however, the point I do agree with is that a variety of manifestations of bilingual education could aid in the targeting of academic success for students of all background. In my EDCI 280 field experience class, 12 out of the 18 first-graders are ELL’s. What I have seen is that the focus of the classroom often shifts between assisting the ELL students and the English proficient students. This practice, whether intentional or not, creates an inconsistency in individual attention. Although the class does have ESOL studies, bilingual education overal, surprisingly, is very limited. This article made me understand that bilingual education promotes a classroom in which individual attention never deviates from the whole, as all students remain focal points at all times. I think that this is why bilingual education has the potential to cultivate higher test scores for all students. As a result, this article allowed my perspective on bilingual education to further develop, by addressing issues on attention and test scores. It currently appears as though bilingual education contains many avenues for enhancing success. Perhaps implementing more comprehensive bilingual education programs could advance all students’ learning in my field experience classroom. 

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Why Tablets Are So Much Better Than Textbooks

Why Tablets Are So Much Better Than Textbooks | Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
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Elizabeth Barnett's insight:

I chose to examine this article for my content curation on Educational Technology because it discusses individual examples of ways educators incorporate technology in the classroom. The report, in essence, compares the use of tablets versus textbooks for academic knowledge communication, by claiming that tablets allow for more accountability and customization of educational material for the teacher. First, tablets give educators a greater capacity to monitor student activity and progress by introducing apps and programs that link the classroom together. Much of my own educational experience was isolating and independent in nature, as it was heavily based on the employment of textbooks. Because textbooks foster private learning with little flexibility, I was raised in school to complete tasks in solitude with minimal guidance from the teacher. This article forced me to make the realization that the use of tablets would unify the class within a technological web. Second, the article mentions that tablets empower both the educators and students by offering adaptable and engaging learning apps, data analysis, and games. Textbooks provide teachers with a rigid view of information that needs to be taught and studied. With a tablet there are more varied presentations of material, and it therefore gives the student more freedom with finding ways of learning that work best on an individual basis. In my schooling, if a student was not able to digest the information through a textbook it could often be a struggle to retain the material. A tablet would have offered a more diverse and comprehensive learning process overall in the classroom. In this sense, this content confirmed my perspective that technology is needed in the classroom. I benefitted from this article’s inclusion of benefits technology has for the teacher. I think, like all educational issues and topics, multiple angles need to be analyzed. It is important that this report covered an angle I hadn’t yet researched. As a soon-to-be teacher, I enjoyed being exposed to what technology in the classroom means for the educator. 

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Lecture hall or laptop? Students go online

Lecture hall or laptop? Students go online | Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
The way our children learn is changing. How are advances in technology and the internet helping them broaden their educational horizons?
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In order to broaden my perspective on Educational Technology, I decided to curate this CNBC article on the national and global benefits of revolutionary technology in education. One significant benefit I found appealing was the expansion of students’ choice as to what they would like their education to look like. I particularly enjoyed this quote from Dr. Meghan Groome, Executive Director of Education and Public Programs at the New York Academy of Sciences: “Education used to be thought of as a teacher sort of opening up a kid’s brain and pouring in the knowledge. Now, if you have a mobile phone a wireless network, you can basically build whatever type of education you want for yourself.” This article helped me to realize that by broadening access to different types of learning through technology, students do not have to be blind purchasers of a processed selection of knowledge, but can be truly informed consumers. In my experience in school, curriculums were forcefully sold to me as a singular truth, and only through technology and participation in technological conversation was I able to be exposed to knowledge in its most diverse and engaging forms. Further, the article discusses the potential technology has to make education accessible to those students who do not have the most quality educators or education financially or physically attainable to them. I had been so focused on thinking of educational technology purely within the classroom, and this article allowed me to think of its advantages on a much grander scale. Through this article, I now hope that technology is financed and implemented throughout educational systems in order to promote this access to all. Overall, this article definitely enhanced my developing perspective on educational technology by illustrating avenues of potential successes beyond the individual classroom. 

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Different Languages, Same Goal: Two-way Bilingual Education

Different Languages, Same Goal: Two-way Bilingual Education | Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
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This scholarly article coming from the University of Michigan made a large impact on my developing perspective that bilingual education enhances the classroom. It highlights the diverse promise of a two-way bilingual education that consists of teaching both English Language Learners and English proficient students in English and ELL’s native languages. I like how this article talks about the social and cultural benefits of bilingual education. Often, proponents of bilingual education point out the advantages having to do with the promotion of ‘21st century knowledge’, especially within the context of globalization, as the world and civilization as a whole are rapidly changing in response to a global economy and society. Although this advantage is compelling, this article discusses that bilingual education promotes empathy, friendship, and understanding amongst cultures and ethnicities, along with globalization. I feel that these benefits are crucial to identify this conversation. As I have seen in my EDCI 280 field experience, often ELL's in the classroom can feel isolated and then socially struggle. Bilingual education can force native English speakers to experience and therefore relate to ELL students. This separatism is rarely subtle or muted, but is in fact obvious, even to the young first-grade students I have worked with this semester. Further, while native languages are silenced, English proficient students are never able to understand the difficulty ELL’s have in learning a new language. Consequently, this isolation extends beyond academic lessons, and into the social infrastructure of the classroom. This content advocates that bilingual education helps to foster empathy by “exposing native English speaker to the ‘burden’ of learning new material in a new language” through teaching on a two-way bilingual scale, which has the vast potential to ameliorate social tension between ethnicities. Because of this, I found this article confirms my developing perspective on the ranging merits of implementing a bilingual education by addressing some its communal advantages. This personal perspective, through this article, is flourishing into the opinion that bilingual education can offer a feeling and energy of unity, positive diversity, and friendliness within the classroom. 

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Surprising Advantages of Bilingual Education . The Parent Show Blog . PBS Parents | PBS

Surprising Advantages of Bilingual Education . The Parent Show Blog . PBS Parents | PBS | Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
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This article describes some of the benefits for individual students from participating in bilingual education. These benefits range from physical, as these children exhibit delayed dementia, to social, being that bilingual education can successfully bridge the gap to a generally bilingual world, to mental, as knowing two languages can aide in task attention and self-regulation. An important note about this article is that it was published in a parent blog, which emphasizes the necessity of raising awareness about the advantages of bilingual education beyond the classroom, and into the home. The content mentions that while 66 percent of the children in the world are raised to speak two languages, only 6.3 percent of American children are. In this vein, the article claims that bilingual education can act as a “passport to the world.” Although I have read this claim before in my content curation, this blog post further confirmed by perspective that bilingual education has huge global potential. However, there were several new benefits mentioned in this article that I believed to be significant in helping to manufacture new impacts on my developing perspective. One is bilingual education’s capacity to advance self-regulation. This notion initially appeared ironic to me based on my personal experiences with learning a new language in school. In elementary school, I participated in a before-school Spanish program that introduced Spanish vocabulary and simple conversational phrases. I felt at the time that the program confused me and added complication to my day. This affected my fledging idea that bilingual education would construct confusion and chaos for young learners. However, after researching the fundamentals of bilingual education, I realize that my before-school program is not at all bilingual education, but an isolated course on a different language. Bilingual education encourages both English and another language within one classroom. In fact, the article discusses that the “discipline required to switch between two languages” boosts and refines a child’s capacity for focusing on an individual task. With so many distractions, this self-regulation is largely beneficial for young students. Consequently, this article helped to broaden my perspective on bilingual education’s capacity to aid in mental development for students, and to solidify my ideas about what bilingual education looks like. 

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Executive Summary | U.S. Department of Education

Education is the key to America's economic growth and prosperity and to our ability to compete in the global economy. It is the path to good jobs and higher earning power for Americans. It is necessary for our democracy to work.
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I wanted to start my content curation on Educational Technology by examining the U.S. Department of Education’s National Education Technology Plan 2010 (NETP), which “calls for revolutionary transformation rather than evolutionary tinkering.” The NETP is rooted in the notion that technology has become the heart of effectively all aspects of our daily lives and jobs, and that therefore education must meet contemporary society at this fundamental level. By heavily implementing technology in the educational experience, schools with produce higher competencies and greater potential for its student population. The NETP models learning driven by technology, and provides goals and recommendations in five key areas, including learning, assessment, teaching, infrastructure, and productivity. Something I found notable in this plan was its desire for technological learning to mirror students’ day-to-day lives and the actuality of their futures. When I reflect on my personal experiences, specifically high school, I can say with complete assurance that my daily lifestyle was largely structured around technological media. I used the computer for school, communication, entertainment, and news, and was rarely seen within my laptop or smartphone in hand. However, what I cannot say with complete assurance is that my in-school existence echoed my outside technological dependence. Classroom lessons and activity was mostly done over textbooks, white boards, and a pencil and paper, and most in-class computer activity was defined by typing an essay. Reading this plan executive summary caused me to believe that technology utilization in schools could make learning engaging and empowering in such a way that parallels the reality of a 21st century existence. My initial opinion on educational technology was that it would be different and possibly challenging for the student, but I think the truth is that my apprehension merely stems from fears about straying for what I know: traditional and “old school” educational methodologies. This content therefore challenged my immediate perspective by providing new information suggesting that technology is not only beneficial, but necessary in contemporary society. 

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Mike Honda: Strengthening the link between technology and education

Mike Honda: Strengthening the link between technology and education | Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
America needs to attract, retain, and mobilize minorities and women into STEM careers.
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This op-ed article from the San Jose Mercury News discusses a personal view on the necessity of bridging the gap between technology and education. Through my research and curation, my developing perspective on educational technology is mainly defined by technology’s benefit to the educational experience in school. I now want to investigate what is holding America back from more expansive implementation of technology in the classroom. One such blockade considered in this content is the inequities that exist within the American school system, as poorer learning institutions simply do not have the funding to cultivate technologically advanced education. As Mike Honda claims in the article, “quality of education should not depend on the ZIP code where you reside, and our education system is only as good as our poorest schools.” I found this statement significant based on my own history in school. I grew up in Montgomery County, Maryland, where there was an abundance of monetary resources needed to fund technology within the school. Although technology remained a more minor component of my educational experience, there was an array of modern advancements found within my schools with the potential to promote a more technologically constructed academia. However, my EDCI 280 field experience was in a school with not as much funding available to be allocated to such advancements. As a result, there is actually very little opportunity for my teacher to incorporate technology into her lesson planning. This content analyzed made me reflect on the differences in technology availability observed between the two school systems. Further, it challenged my perspective on the ability school system’s have to incorporate technology. Before reading this I assumed that school officials were not implementing more technology because it radically steers away from a conventional education, but now I more equipped to see the real challenges schools face in making this change. This article impacted my developing perspective by highlighting what factors are hindering schools from modernizing. I now feel like I have a more comprehensive outlook on the subject. Past this content curation, I would like to research what type of budget and funding arrangements would need to be changed in order to better introduce technology into curriculums. 

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Core of Education Prepares to Launch First of Five-Part Series Titled "Educational Technology and Dyslexia: Using Tech to Eliminate Needless Suffering"

Core of Education Prepares to Launch First of Five-Part Series Titled "Educational Technology and Dyslexia: Using Tech to Eliminate Needless Suffering" | Bilingual Education | Scoop.it
(PRWEB) November 12, 2013 -- Dr. Rod Berger sits down with Dr. Michael Hart in a new series to discuss special education and the role that technology can and has played in improving learning and performance.
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This public relations article discusses the potential educational technology has for students with language-based learning problems. The online services Dr. Michael Hart provides for children with these issues include consultations, courses, and webinars. I included this report in my content curation on Educational Technology because it demonstrates the advantages technology contains for students with various learning disabilities. I think in order to make the conversation on educational technology thorough I have to include a dialogue on students outside the realm of ‘normal functioning.’ What Dr. Hart maintains is that educational technology can greatly aide in organizing, treating, and addressing deficiencies in language processing. I found it significant and poignant that online capabilities cover educational skills in reading, writing and spelling. This also made me think about including students with learning disabilities in a 21st century technological society, and not depriving them. Although I have no personal experience with learning disabilities, I do tutor an elementary a fifth-grade boy with mild autism, ADHD, and dysgraphia. When he was in a mainstreamed public school, he struggled with writing, reading, and test taking. He had great trouble writing with a pen and paper, and reading notations written on a white board. Traditional elements of education prevented him from fulfilling his academic potential. He was moved this year to a school with a Learning Disabled Gift and Talented Program (LDGT) and I have seen such a positive shift in his academic abilities. This has much to do with the LDGT’s immersion of educational technology in the classroom: books are read via IPod, essays are scribed through computer software, and SMART Boards are used to provide more visual learning. This article only confirmed my perspective that educational technology is enormously beneficial for students with learning disabilities. Dr. Hart asserts that technology can strengthen and advance cognitive abilities, while dodging inherent inabilities. I was not well versed on its benefits for those students with language-based learning difficulties so this content impacted my developing perspective by offering this valuable information. I can now see how technology’s diversity can be an asset for all those students who struggle with more customary and orthodox ways of communicating information in the classroom. 

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