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Fatal care: Foster care tragedies cloaked in secrecy

Fatal care: Foster care tragedies cloaked in secrecy | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
The Alberta government has dramatically under-reported the number of child welfare deaths over the past decade, undermining public accountability and thwarting efforts at prevention and reform.
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An article that reveils the underside of foster care. However, it's important not to create generalizations of foster care that all foster children are abused and neglected in foster homes. Certainly there are bad foster homes, but there are also good fosters and foster families as well.

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Velvet Martin's comment, January 9, 2014 3:22 AM
Today, a press conference divulged that 145 children did not die... The tally of fatalities is actually 741 children! http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/edmonton/Child+welfare+death+review+dates/9364286/story.html
Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan
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Protecting a gift from the creator: Anishinabe harvest wild rice to test their treaty rights

Protecting a gift from the creator: Anishinabe harvest wild rice to test their treaty rights | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
In addition, there’s concern about the impact that current and future mines have on lakes and rivers. “We are not just talking about the pipeline but also about mining–there’s quite a bit of pollution,” says Robert DesJarlait. “There’s a 140-mile stretch of the St. Louis River which are wild rice dead zones because of all the sulfates, and now they want a copper mine. Our wild rice will be affected by the pipeline and the mines,” he said. “for us, wild rice is a sacred plant to us. It’s a spiritual issue and a cultural issue.” For many, harvesting wild rice doesn’t make a whole lot of money–maybe enough to provide clothing for their kids. “Nobody gets rich off it,” he said.
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Offering tobacco and bottled water for a sea of oil, Chevron gets booted from indigenous territory

Offering tobacco and bottled water for a sea of oil, Chevron gets booted from indigenous territory | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
Yesterday Chevron, the company behind the Pacific Trails fracking pipeline, attempted to enter our unceded territories. They have no consent from our chiefs and our hereditary governance system, who are standing strong in their stance against all pipelines. Next to the Wedzin Kwah river, which is pure enough to drink from, Chevron presented us with an offering of bottled water and industrial tobacco.
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Alberta woman fined for possessing eagle wing - APTN National News

Alberta woman fined for possessing eagle wing - APTN National News | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
To do it legally, Aboriginal people must fill out a form at a Fish and Wildlife district office explaining why they want some of the eagle feathers the department keeps in storage. “This will be considered and they will receive a response in writing,” said an Alberta government spokesman.

The request is denied if it’s not going for a specific spiritual or faith-based purpose, the spokesman said from Edmonton, which does not include “competitive dance costumes or trade or barter.”
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According to this article, it is "illegal" to use eagle feathers for competitive dancing in Alberta. Obviously, Alberta Fish and Wildlife doesn't strictly enforce the "law" according to the colonizers. Yet that doesn't prevent culturcide from happening; in essence, it makes culturcide legal for the oppressor. As long as there are laws that restrict cultural expression, indigenous religious freedom will remain an act of subversion. Such "laws" are as archaic as the society they represent.

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"Second cancer" cases becoming more common

"Second cancer" cases becoming more common | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
But more people getting a form of the disease different than they already had is actually a partial medical success story, researchers say
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Arne Vainio: Doing more to support our Native youth in medicine

Arne Vainio: Doing more to support our Native youth in medicine | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
Attending the annual meeting of the Association of American Indian Physicians made me realize what I’ve been doing to help our youth isn’t enough.
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Critic of South Dakota foster care arrested on old charge

Family members of a Crow Creek Sioux Tribe woman who has spoken out against South Dakota’s handling of Native American children in foster care are questioning whether her arrest on a 13-year-old charge was politically motivated.
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Majority of Red Lake Nation members vote no to alcohol sales...

Vote Results

Red Lake: 184 yes, 322 no
Ponemah: 99 yes, 91 no
Redby: 126 yes, 191 no
Little Rock: 93 yes, 131 no
Absentee In Person: 64 yes, 84 no
Absentee Minneapolis: 31 yes, 32 no
Absentee By Mail: 242 yes, 124 no
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Agency: PolyMet discharge would flow north to BWCA - Timberjay.com

But GLIFWC’s Environmental Section Leader John Coleman, in his June letter, says his agency’s own model run shows dramatically different results, and points to the primary contaminant flow running north, into the Peter Mitchell pits, a series of taconite pits operated by Northshore Mining, located high on the Laurentian Divide, near Babbitt. The pits, which sit about a mile north of the proposed PolyMet mine, currently discharge in several directions. Upon closure, however, all of the discharge is slated to enter Birch Lake, part of the Kawishiwi River, a major BWCAW watershed.
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Is Keystone XL Trampling Sioux Treaty Rights?

Is Keystone XL Trampling Sioux Treaty Rights? | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it

“The Public Utilities Commission does not have authority to make decisions regarding the water resources which clearly will be affected by the TransCanada Keystone XL,” said hearing intervener Elizabeth Lone Eagle. “You have no other option than to deny,” she said in her closing statement.
Quoting her father, Rosebud Sioux tribal member John Paul Clifford, she said, “You have no jurisdiction to rule on anything that could potentially affect Indian land on the reservation or those lands that are federal Indian trust lands and most certainly not to grant a permit to any corporate entity, foreign or domestic, which would encroach in any way by crossing, spilling or causing any disturbance ·to these lands, which afford financial support and homesteads to the Native American Indian tribal members.
“Any ruling you make which would have any effect on Indian lands is in direct violation of Article 6 of the U.S. Constitution, whereby treaties are deemed the ‘supreme law of the land’ and in particular treaties made with Lakota nations,” Clifford had told the commissioners earlier.

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A Meme Gets An Uncomfortable Backstory In 'Straight Outta Compton'

A Meme Gets An Uncomfortable Backstory In 'Straight Outta Compton' | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
That you love hip-hop because it's a product of your culture, and it's done so much, in so many ways, to give voice to your culture and your community. But you can't ignore, especially in this movie, how the culture degrades women. You can't ignore the rampant misogyny and the brutality that's also part of the culture.
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Amazon Watch Denounces Eli Roth’s Racist Film, “The Green Inferno”

Amazon Watch Denounces Eli Roth’s Racist Film, “The Green Inferno” | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
As government policy-makers establish policies that may threaten and violate the rights of indigenous peoples, the release of Roth’s “The Green Inferno” barges into a delicate moment. AIDESEP’s statement about the film underscores the sensitivity and vulnerability of indigenous rights. “This kind of film and images feed the prejudices that already exist in society in regard to indigenous peoples, furthering negative stereotypes that they are “savages” and “cannibals,” which is a big lie. This kind of content also reinforces policies of the Peruvian state that are geared towards contacting them through force, integrating them into society, imposing upon them a certain way of life, acculturating them, “freeing up their territories” and taking advantage of the natural resources found within,” says AIDESEP’s Huertas.
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Moscow river catches fire after pipeline bursts – video

Amateur footage shows a large oil fire on the surface of the Moscow river after an underwater pipeline reportedly burst on Wednesday
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Shape of things to come with the Enbridge underwater pipeline at the Straits of Mackinac?

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Former Speaker Was a Man of Compassion - Mille Lacs Band Of Ojibwe

Former Speaker Was a Man of Compassion - Mille Lacs Band Of Ojibwe | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
Dave was a pillar of our community, always there to help anyone in need — anytime. He believed in our culture, and truly lived our seven values, one hundred percent. As a former elected leader, as a Drumkeeper and as a keeper of our history, he will be dearly missed by the entire community.” – Chief Executive Melanie Benjamin
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Amelia Boynton Robinson dies at 104; civil rights icon was at Selma

Amelia Boynton Robinson dies at 104; civil rights icon was at Selma | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
She never became a household name, but the grainy photos of Amelia Boynton Robinson crumpled on the side of the road in Selma, Ala., after being tear-gassed and beaten by state troopers came to be one of the most searing images of America’s civil rights struggle.
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Chief Tuira Kayapo: A Bold Matriarchal Warrior Who Refuses Colonist Fuckery into Her World

Chief Tuira Kayapo:  A Bold Matriarchal Warrior Who Refuses Colonist Fuckery into Her World | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
We have decided that your word is worth nothing. The conversation is over. We, the Mebengôre Kayapó people have decided that we do not want a single penny of your dirty money. We do not accept Belo Monte or any other dam on the Xingu. Our river does not have a price, our fish that we eat does not have a price, and the happiness of our grandchildren does not have a price. We will never stop fighting: In Altamira, in Brasilia, or in the Supreme Court. The Xingu is our home and you are not welcome here.
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Article from May 21 2014 with an August 18, 2015 update.

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Detektor Emas's curator insight, August 26, 11:10 PM

Lol. Coba begini di Indonesia. Bahaya. 

www.tambang.id

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Wild rice showdown looms in northern Minnesota

Wild rice showdown looms in northern Minnesota | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
Frank Bibeau, attorney for the 1855 Treaty Authority, said the planned act of civil disobedience is meant to actively challenge Minnesota’s position that band members have no off-reservation hunting, fishing or gathering rights on northern lands that were ceded in the 1855 Treaty with the federal government.

If violators are prosecuted for their “en masse wild rice harvest,’’ the issue could land in court as an important test case and engulf the state in another treaty rights battle.
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What I’ve been doing isn’t enough - Indian Country News

What I’ve been doing isn’t enough - Indian Country News | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
By Arne Vainio, M.D.


I haven’t been to an Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP) conference since they had one in Minneapolis eight years ago. This year the conference was held on the Tulalip reservation just north of Seattle, Washington. I did my residency in Seattle and I’d been looking forward to going back for some time and I was planning on taking an elder with me. All of us as physicians would benefit from having an elder at the conference, the students would benefit from having an elder there and the elder would go back to his community after seeing hundreds of Native American physicians in one place with the betterment of Indian health as the focus. I don’t think any of us would ever be the same.

That part didn’t work out and George had some other issues that came up at the last minute and he wasn’t able to go. That was unfortunate as I was planning on taking a few extra days so we could drive to the ocean, drive into the Cascade mountains and to watch for orcas from the ferry ride across Puget Sound.

The two days before the actual start of the conference was a pre-admission workshop for students to strengthen their chances of getting into medical school and the health professions in general. I did not attend that part of the conference.

Shannon Wiegand, M.D. is a physician in Fairbanks, Alaska and she and I were the very first residents chosen for the Seattle Indian Health Board residency program in 1994. We laughed and cried together for the three years of our residency training and I’ve only seen her a couple of times since then. Residency is a glorious and terrifying time and those three years are where I learned to deliver babies and where I learned to break the news of a terminal illness and learned to walk with someone from that moment on through their final journey.

Some of my earliest mentors and teachers were at the conference. I sat with Terry Maresca, M.D. and she incorporates natural and herbal medicines into her practice and taught a session on herbal medicines and their use in chronic pain. Dale Walker, M.D. works in psychiatry and led a session on PTSD and historical trauma that was eye opening to me personally and made me realize I’ve been working in a vacuum of my own making since before I even applied for medical school. When I was young, maybe ten years old, I was in a car and witnessed a domestic beating from a distance of a couple of feet away and I never made a sound, never made an effort to stop it or intervene in any way. I sat back in the darkness of the car to protect myself and I was careful not to even breathe to avoid bringing that drunken wrath upon myself. I can replay that scene in my head and it plays in slow motion and I smell beer and cigarettes and see the silhouette in the dashboard lights of his fist coming up again and again and seeing blood spray from her nose and hearing the popping sound of her lips and then her soft whimpering crying as he turned back to the steering wheel and put the car in gear and started to drive again. I hadn’t allowed that vision in decades and it came flooding back to me during Dr. Walker’s presentation and I saw myself walking a path alone since that night, never fully trusting anyone but myself.

There were other students I could have helped when I was in my undergraduate studies and even in medical school and I didn’t reach out to them and several of them failed. Maybe things could have been different.

Erik Brodt, M.D. is just a relatively few years out of residency and is working with the We Are Healers project to use videos and the internet to reach out to our youth to get them interested in health careers. He showed a series of short and powerful videos showcasing American Indian doctors working and also doing things outside of medicine so others can get a glimpse into the lives they could have. You can search We Are Healers on the Internet to find the videos and make sure the young people in your lives see them. They will be filming me in late September.

I spent time talking with students at the conference and was struck by how much difference even just a short conversation could have with someone uncertain if becoming a doctor is the right thing to do or if it’s too difficult to even dream the dream.

I sat with the former Director of the Indian Health Service and she told me I need to reach further and that my words need to reach a bigger audience and I will be working to that end. Judith Kaur, M.D. is one of our physicians and she is one of the leaders of the Spirit of Eagles cancer prevention and education initiative out of the Mayo Clinic and I renewed my commitment to working with her in any way I can. Their long-term goal is to reduce cancer health disparities by maintaining and expanding tribal community networks.

They had a powwow on Saturday night of the conference and Peter Talbot, M.D. stopped by to catch up with any residents or other doctors he may not have seen for awhile. He has been at the Seattle Indian Health Board for thirty-eight years and was one of my primary teachers as I was becoming a doctor. On days when I’m late to clinic, I tell myself it’s because Peter Talbot taught me to sit on the edge of a hospital bed and explain things in terms people can understand and answer any questions they might have, however long that might take.

During the powwow, I gave asemaa to Tim Tallchief, the AAIP powwow master of ceremonies and asked for an honor song for Peter. The Association of Native American Medical Students (ANAMS) had an auction for a blanket as a fundraiser. The bidding was rapid at first, but as it kept going higher and higher the bids came in slower and slower until the bidders wouldn’t even look Tim in the eye. Tim called the final offer, “going once, going twice…” and I raised my hand and “Sold! To Doctor Arne Vainio!”

Then he announced the honor song for Dr. Talbot and this came as a total surprise to Peter. He came to the center of the arena and Shannon and I put the blanket around his shoulders as the drum group started the honor song. We danced in place as everyone came by to shake his hand and then we finally started dancing around the arena. Shannon and I danced with him and his wife, Lani and we ended a beautiful evening with all those doctors and medical students and community members dancing with us to honor Peter and his life of commitment to Indian Health. There were many other American Indian doctors from multiple tribes at the conference and all of them are working to better the health of our people.

Mary Owen, M.D. is the Director for the Center for American Indian and Minority Health at the University of Minnesota, Duluth School of Medicine. I live within ten miles of the medical school and I pat myself on the back sometimes because I teach a session for the incoming first year students every year and I have medical students spend time with me in the clinic.

Seeing all these physicians and hearing them speak and seeing their dedication makes me realize what I’ve been doing isn’t enough. We need healthy, drug free communities. We need to be recruiting our youth even harder to get them into medicine. We need to keep those students in medical school once they get there.

We need to do that not as individuals, but together. Encourage your youth, support them and expect great things from them. Send them to us.

We are the Association of American Indian Physicians.

We Are Healers.


Arne Vainio, M.D. is an enrolled member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe and is a family practice physician on the Fond du Lac reservation in Cloquet, Minnesota. He can be reached at a-vainio@hotmail.com.
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Fox News fans celebrate Jimmy Carter having cancer in his brain, 'good riddance'

Fox News fans celebrate Jimmy Carter having cancer in his brain, 'good riddance' | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
Former President Jimmy Carter said he has melanoma in his brain, and that he will receive radiation treatment for the cancer beginning Thursday while scaling back work for his philanthropic foundation.
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Being a cancer survivor and working as an advocate for cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers, I simply have no words for this. I would not wish cancer on my worst enemy or hater. To express joy for a person who has cancer for his/her views is inhumane. Politics can draw out the worst in people. And it's sad that some would extend their political bitterness toward a man who has brought some measure of goodness into the world.

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Straight Outta Compton: Shameless Misogyny & the Complexity of White Supremacy by Lawrence Ware | NewBlackMan (in Exile)

Straight Outta Compton: Shameless Misogyny & the Complexity of White Supremacy by Lawrence Ware | NewBlackMan (in Exile) | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
Films about historical figures are political statements. What filmmakers choose to include is just as important as what they choose to exclude. Let’s look at what SOC unnecessarily includes: scene after scene of nude black women sexually gratifying men. (Both fair and dark skinned black women are featured. Those outraged by the colorism in the casting call only succeeded in ensuring that women of all shades are objectified.) Female characters are used for sex and discarded. They are used as eye pleasing décor in party scenes. Women wear revealing clothing for purposes that neither serve the narrative nor communicate anything distinctive about the characters they portray.

The ingenuity with which words are used to degrade women is almost impressive in its profligacy. The film is misogynistic in what it includes, but it is more misogynistic in what it excludes.
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Fighting for wild rice rights in Minnesota

Fighting for wild rice rights in Minnesota | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
Moreover, some of the activists are looking for a court decision that recognizes a tribal regulatory authority under the treaty to protect the environment — water quality, wild rice, wild game and fish — including authority over major projects with potential environmental impacts, such as pipelines, powerlines and mines.
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John Myers with the most in-depth article on the 1855 Treaty issue.

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DNR warns independent Chippewa group over plans to harvest wild rice in test of treaty rights

DNR warns independent Chippewa group over plans to harvest wild rice in test of treaty rights | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
The Dayton administration has warned a group of Chippewa Indians who plan to harvest wild rice without state licenses later this month that they risk prosecution and seizure of their rice and equipment.
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Four short paragraphs? Let me count the ways the StarTrib COULD have written an article with more content. The 1855 Treaty Authority gets short shrift with one sentence. On the other hand, the DNR and Landwehr get two paragraphs that present the state's side of the issue. Why not more information of the 1855 Treaty Authority and quotes from the Authority? Why not more information on the treaty issue, i.e. usufructuary rights to harvest wild rice? Why not a little more background on past actions, e.g., the fishing protest at Lake Bemidji in 2010? Why not a mention of the 1999 Supreme Court decision that affirmed usufructuary rights under the 1831 and 1854 Treaties - although that decision didn't directly impact the 1855 Treaty, it sets the stage for affirmation of 1855 treaty rights. Karnowski must be taking slanting lessons from Dennis Anderson who is a master of the anti-sovereign slant regarding treaty issues. So I guess we really can't expect more since it's the StarTrib.  

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Beatings By Dr. Dre — Medium

Beatings By Dr. Dre — Medium | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
He picked her up by her hair and “began slamming her head and the right side of her body repeatedly against a brick wall near the stairway” as his bodyguard held off the crowd with a gun. After Dre tried to throw her down the stairs and failed, he began kicking her in the ribs and hands. She escaped and ran into the women’s rest room. Dre followed her and “grabbed her from behind by the hair again and proceeded to punch her in the back of the head.”
Members of N.W.A. discussed the attack in subsequent interviews. And I quote.

MC Ren: “She deserved it—bitch deserved it.”

Eazy-E: “Yeah, bitch had it coming.”

Dr. Dre himself: “People talk all this shit, but you know, somebody fucks with me, I’m gonna fuck with them. I just did it, you know. Ain’t nothing you can do now by talking about it. Besides, it ain’t no big thing—I just threw her through a door.”
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Article from 2014.

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Wild rice harvest will test treaty rights

Wild rice harvest will test treaty rights | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
"We're looking for a case to bring this to the (federal) court where we will undoubtedly prevail the same way we did with the 1837 case for Mille Lacs and the 1854 case for the Lake Superior region," said Frank Bibeau, an attorney for the 1855 Treaty Authority.

The group is planning a major wild-rice harvesting event for Aug. 27 on Hole-in-the-Day Lake near Nisswa in north-central Minnesota. The lake is named after an Ojibwe or Chippewa chief who was among the signatories to major treaties with the federal government in the 19th century.
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World without Water: The Dangerous Misuse of Our Most Valuable Resource - SPIEGEL ONLINE

World without Water: The Dangerous Misuse of Our Most Valuable Resource - SPIEGEL ONLINE | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
The Earth may be a blue planet when seen from space, but only 2.5 percent of its water is fresh. That water is wasted, polluted and poisoned and its distribution is appallingly unfair.
The world's population has almost tripled since 1950, but water consumption has increased six-fold. To make matters worse, mankind is changing the Earth's climate with greenhouse gas emissions, which only exacerbates the injustices.

When we talk about water becoming scarce, we are first and foremost referring to people who are suffering from thirst. Close to a billion people are forced to drink contaminated water, while another 2.3 billion suffer from a shortage of water. How will we manage to feed more and more people with less and less water?

But people in developing countries are no longer the only ones affected by the problem. Droughts facilitate the massive wildfires in California, and they adversely affect farms in Spain. Water has become the business of global corporations and it is being wasted on a gigantic scale to turn a profit and operate farms in areas where they don't belong.
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Bernie Sanders on Native American Rights

Bernie Sanders on Native American Rights | Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan | Scoop.it
The content on feelthebern.org is not a reflection of Senator Sanders, his office, or his campaign.
This website is made and maintained by volunteers with no relation to or association with Bernie Sanders.
Robert DesJarlait's insight:

Some nifty and crafty spin here. The people who put this together are hip enough to know that the Native vote matters, and in reaching for that vote, they've cleverly put together a package to attract the Native vote. The fact is that Sanders doesn't have a Senate record on Native Americans. All the bills cited are not specifically about Native American issues, but are about diverse populations of which Natives are a part of. Of course, there will be Native supporters of Sanders who will post the Sanders spin and hope people will overlook the disclaimer that comes with it.  

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