Research_Information Literacy
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Research_Information Literacy
Integrating the Big6 research strategy into the curriculum
Curated by Joan Holt
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The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion

The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it

"News sources can't just give us the facts. They must tell us what those facts mean."


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, February 24, 2014 4:55 PM



Here's a refreshing look at the future of news that highlights the importance of going deeper into creating value for readers by providing more focus, relevance, context and opinion.

These are the characters that properly define what we now refer to as "curation" when it comes to content and news.


The following passages, extracted from the book, The News: A User's Manual, are by Alain de Botton, and have been excerpted from a lengthy article on The Week entitled "The Future of News".


"News organizations are coy about admitting that what they present us with each day are minuscule extracts of narratives whose true shape and logic can generally only emerge from a perspective of months or even years — and that it would hence often be wiser to hear the story in chapters rather than snatched sentences.


They [news organizations] are institutionally committed to implying that it is inevitably better to have a shaky and partial grasp of a subject this minute than to wait for a more secure and comprehensive understanding somewhere down the line.


...


We need news organizations to help our curiosity by signaling how their stories fit into the larger themes on which a sincere capacity for interest depends.


To grow interested in any piece of information, we need somewhere to "put" it, which means some way of connecting it to an issue we already know how to care about.


A section of the human brain might be pictured as a library in which information is shelved under certain fundamental categories. Most of what we hear about day to day easily signals where in the stacks it should go and gets immediately and unconsciously filed.


... the stranger or the smaller stories become, the harder the shelving process grows. What we colloquially call "feeling bored" is just the mind, acting out of a self-preserving reflex, ejecting information it has despaired of knowing where to place.


...We might need help in transporting such orphaned pieces of information to the stacks that would most appropriately reveal their logic.


...it is news organizations to take on some of this librarian's work. It is for them to give us a sense of the larger headings under which minor incidents belong."

 


The call for understanding how much greater value can be provided by curating news and information in depth, rather than by following the shallow, buzzy and viral path beaten by HuffPo, Buzzfeed and the rest of the gang, is clear.


But beyond context and depth, real value can only be added if we accept the fact that going beyond the classic "objective fact reporting", by adding opinion and bias in a transparent fashion, can actually provide greater value in many ways, as Alain de Botton clearly explains:


"Unfortunately for our levels of engagement, there is a prejudice at large within many news organizations that the most prestigious aspect of journalism is the dispassionate and neutral presentation of "facts."


...


The problem with facts is that there is nowadays no shortage of sound examples. The issue is not that we need more of them, but that we don't know what to do with the ones we have...


...But what do these things actually mean? How are they related to the central questions of political life? What can they help us to understand?


...The opposite of facts is bias. In serious journalistic quarters, bias has a very bad name. It is synonymous with malevolent agendas, lies, and authoritarian attempts to deny audiences the freedom to make up their own minds.


Yet we should perhaps be more generous toward bias.


In its pure form, a bias simply indicates a method of evaluating events that is guided by a coherent underlying thesis about human functioning and flourishing.


It is a pair of lenses that slide over reality and aim to bring it more clearly into focus.


Bias strives to explain what events mean and introduces a scale of values by which to judge ideas and events. It seems excessive to try to escape from bias per se; the task is rather to find ways to alight on its more reliable and fruitful examples. 


There are countless worthy lenses to slide between ourselves and the world." 


Overall, these ideas offer a truly refreshing look at the future of news and at the relevance that context and opinion could play in transforming this medium from a vehicle of mass distraction to one of focused learning and understanding for those interested. 



Must read. Rightful. Insightful. 9/10



Full article: http://theweek.com/article/index/256737/the-future-of-news 


Reading time: 10':20"






Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 25, 2014 2:36 PM

El futuro de las Noticias no es sobre los Hechos, sino sobre contexto, relevancia y opinión.

Catherine Pascal's curator insight, March 3, 2014 5:12 AM

 Intéressant 

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Learning to Learn: leveraging your circadian rhythm

Learning to Learn: leveraging your circadian rhythm | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it
There are a few distinct, precious moments of heightened sensory elation that we can achieve through unique actions; whether that be hitting the sweet spot on your driver from the tee box, tossing that crumpled up piece of paper that started out as...
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The library comes alive: (the information literacy song)

The library comes alive: (the information literacy song) | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it

 A humorous reworking of Coldplay's hit song "Viva La Vida" with new lyrics by Dr. James F. McGrath of Butler University, focusing on information literacy...


Via Joyce Valenza
Joan Holt's insight:

Advantages in using a library via music.

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The Teacher's Guide to Social Media

The Teacher's Guide to Social Media | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it
Even digitally versed teachers need to evolve with the language of their increasingly connected students. Here's a social media guide to help.

Via Joyce Valenza
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Teaching Students Better Online Research Skills

Teaching Students Better Online Research Skills | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it
Many educators are explicitly teaching such skills as how to evaluate a website's credibility, how to use precise keywords, and how to better mine search engines.

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Linda Dougherty's curator insight, June 12, 2013 12:09 AM

Good article to share with your teachers who are looking to improve student research skills to meet standards.

Maria Persson's comment, June 17, 2013 11:00 PM
If this happens in the early years of learning it will not be such an issue at the tertiary level where plagiarism is still a real problem!
Maria Persson's curator insight, June 17, 2013 11:07 PM

A number of great points that are both practical and theoritical in terms of how to assist students' understanding of digital literacy skills, preparing them for the future, increasing their understanding of what the future might bring! 

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Are you a thought leader?

Are you a thought leader? | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it
Editor’s Note: This article was produced and written by Laura Garnett. You can view the original article here.
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Information Literacy - Lifelong learning & the digital divide

Information Literacy - Lifelong learning & the digital divide | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it
Information literacy is often confused and constrained to the concept of 'digital' and ICT literacy; many public libraries choose to solely inform and educate patrons on social media and technology...

Via Joyce Valenza
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Learning to learn: losing yourself in passion

Learning to learn: losing yourself in passion | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it
Joan Holt's insight:

What is your passion? Find topics you want to learn more about.

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The New School Library

The New School Library | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it
As libraries continue to change with the growth of technology tools, good schools know that libraries and professional librarians are still essential to their missions.

Via Joyce Valenza
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Anne McLean's curator insight, June 20, 2013 3:58 AM

More important than ever, in the digital age.

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How To Cite Social Media Using MLA and APA - Edudemic

How To Cite Social Media Using MLA and APA - Edudemic | Research_Information Literacy | Scoop.it
Social media posts and videos are cropping up in academic publications more and more. This chart shows just how to cite social media with ease.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 2, 2013 11:50 AM

Here's a convenient chart that includes blog posts, youtube video, tweets, facebook posts and email. 

Kathy Lenard's curator insight, June 10, 2013 12:03 PM

I have had problems in the past with citing information from Social Media.  I was so glad to see this article!  It will certainly help me and I hope you find it useful in your writing projects.