Big Data
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Big Data
Big Date is about the emergence of new facts and unsuspected correlations as new, unexpected, non-obvious properties of a complex system that are distinct from the properties of its different parts.
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Big data is quite useless without visual analytics

Big data is quite useless without visual analytics | Big Data | Scoop.it

Big Data, with its vast data volumes, is largely useless without the data analytic and presentation functionality found in visual analytic tools. Think about how difficult it is to spot anomalies or trends in endless rows and columns of spreadsheet data. Visual analytic tools solve that data overload problem.


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Big data can’t bring objectivity to a subjective world

Big data can’t bring objectivity to a subjective world | Big Data | Scoop.it
It seems everyone is interested in big data these days. From social scientists to advertisers, professionals from all walks of life are singing the praises of 21st-century data science.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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Creepy: Google AI invents its own cryptographic algorithm and no one knows how it works 

Creepy: Google AI invents its own cryptographic algorithm and no one knows how it works  | Big Data | Scoop.it

Google Brain has created two artificial intelligences that evolved their own cryptographic algorithm to protect their messages from a third AI, which was trying to evolve its own method to crack the AI-generated crypto. The study was a success: the first two AIs learnt how to communicate securely from scratch.

 

The Google Brain team (which is based out in Mountain View and is separate from Deep Mind in London) started with three fairly vanilla neural networks called Alice, Bob, and Eve. Each neural network was given a very specific goal: Alice had to send a secure message to Bob; Bob had to try and decrypt the message; and Eve had to try and eavesdrop on the message and try to decrypt it. Alice and Bob have one advantage over Eve: they start with a shared secret key (i.e. this is symmetric encryption).

 

Importantly, the AIs were not told how to encrypt stuff, or what crypto techniques to use: they were just given a loss function (a failure condition), and then they got on with it. In Eve's case, the loss function was very simple: the distance, measured in correct and incorrect bits, between Alice's original input plaintext and its guess. For Alice and Bob the loss function was a bit more complex: if Bob's guess (again measured in bits) was too far from the original input plaintext, it was a loss; for Alice, if Eve's guesses are better than random guessing, it's a loss. And thus an adversarial generative network (GAN) was created.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Do's and Don'ts of Using Regexes With Big Data - DZone Big Data

The Do's and Don'ts of Using Regexes With Big Data - DZone Big Data | Big Data | Scoop.it
This article covers how regular expressions have a perennial place in any software engineer's toolkit.
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In The World of Big Data, Nothing Is For Free

In the world of Big Data only more and more data will be collected and these data will pay for the 'free' services that are offered online.
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Silicon Valley is "an absolute candy store for economists," said Peter Coles

Silicon Valley is "an absolute candy store for economists," said Peter Coles | Big Data | Scoop.it
The promise of big data and big paychecks is drawing some of academia’s top economists to study consumer behavior for tech companies like Airbnb, Amazon and Uber.
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Machine learning set to unlock the power of big data | Information Age

Machine learning set to unlock the power of big data | Information Age | Big Data | Scoop.it
Organisations that realise value from their data assets faster through advanced analytics will quickly surpass their competition
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This Mathematician Says Big Data Punishes Poor People

This Mathematician Says Big Data Punishes Poor People | Big Data | Scoop.it
Algorithms that we use daily actually thwart equality, says Cathy O'Neil, author of 'Weapons of Math Destruction'
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3 Lessons Netflix Can Teach You About Big Data Tactics

3 Lessons Netflix Can Teach You About Big Data Tactics | Big Data | Scoop.it
Summer is the time to binge-watch.All of your favorite shows are at their peak, and Netflix makes it that much easier for you — it knows what you want to watch next, and always gives you the right…...
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Yuval Harari on Big Data, Google and the end of free will - FT.com

Yuval Harari on Big Data, Google and the end of free will - FT.com | Big Data | Scoop.it
For thousands of years humans believed that authority came from the gods. Then, during the modern era, humanism gradually shifted authority from deities to people. Jean-Jacques Rousseau summed up this revolution in Emile, his 1762 treatise on
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Tech Giants Target Terrorist Propaganda

Tech Giants Target Terrorist Propaganda | Big Data | Scoop.it
Social-media companies are trying to level the playing field in the online propaganda war with Islamist radicals. Their goal is to see what kinds of messages could reach potential extremists before they become radicalized.
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Humans are the weak link in Big Data

Humans are the weak link in Big Data | Big Data | Scoop.it
Big Data is coming whether we are ready or not. But given the human ability to ignore facts when they conflict with beliefs, will Big Data help on our biggest issues, or just give us a store coupon while the world burns?
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'The R Inferno': All those little R quirks, in a quite humorous way

'The R Inferno': All those little R quirks, in a quite humorous way | Big Data | Scoop.it
Patrick Burns's book “The R Inferno” describes all these little confusing things about R, in quite humorous and ironical way.
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Singularity 2045: The Year Man Becomes Immortal Or Is No Longer Needed 

Singularity 2045: The Year Man Becomes Immortal Or Is No Longer Needed  | Big Data | Scoop.it

We're fast approaching the moment when humans and machines merge. Welcome to the Singularity movement.

 

On Feb. 15, 1965, a diffident but self-possessed high school student named Raymond Kurzweil appeared as a guest on a game show called I've Got a Secret. He was introduced by the host, Steve Allen, then he played a short musical composition on a piano. The idea was that Kurzweil was hiding an unusual fact and the panelists — they included a comedian and a former Miss America — had to guess what it was. On the show (the clip on YouTube), the beauty queen did a good job of grilling Kurzweil, but the comedian got the win: the music was composed by a computer. Kurzweil got $200. (Watch TIME's video "Singularity: How Scared Should We Be?")

 

Kurzweil then demonstrated 'the computer', which he built himself — a desk-size affair with loudly clacking relays, hooked up to a typewriter. The panelists were pretty blasé about it; they were more impressed by Kurzweil's young age than by anything he had actually done. They were ready to move on to Mrs. Chester Loney of Rough and Ready, Calif., whose secret was that she'd been President Lyndon Johnson's first-grade teacher.

 

But Kurzweil would spend much of the rest of his career working out what his demonstration meant. Creating a work of art is one of those activities we reserve for humans and humans only. It's an act of self-expression; you're not supposed to be able to do it if you don't have a self. To see creativity, the exclusive domain of humans, usurped by a computer built by a 17-year-old is to watch a line blur that cannot be unblurred, the line between organic intelligence and artificial intelligence.

 

That was Kurzweil's real secret, and back in 1965 nobody guessed it. Maybe not even him, not yet. But now, 46 years later, Kurzweil believes that we're approaching a moment when computers will become intelligent, and not just intelligent but more intelligent than humans. When that happens, humanity — our bodies, our minds, our civilization — will be completely and irreversibly transformed. He believes that this moment is not only inevitable but imminent. According to his calculations, the end of human civilization as we know it is about 35 years away.

(See the best inventions of 2010.)

 

Computers are getting faster. Everybody knows that. Also, computers are getting faster faster — that is, the rate at which they're getting faster is increasing. True? True. So if computers are getting so much faster, so incredibly fast, there might conceivably come a moment when they are capable of something comparable to human intelligence. That 'something' is Artificial intelligence or often called AI. All that horsepower could be put in the service of emulating whatever it is our brains are doing when they create consciousness — not just doing arithmetic very quickly or composing piano music but also driving cars, writing books, making ethical decisions, appreciating fancy paintings, making witty observations at cocktail parties.

 

If you can swallow that idea, and Kurzweil and a lot of other very smart people can, then all bets are off. From that point on, there's no reason to think computers would stop getting more powerful. They would keep on developing until they were far more intelligent than we are. Their rate of development would also continue to increase, because they would take over their own development from their slower-thinking human creators. Imagine a computer scientist that was itself a super-intelligent computer. It would work incredibly quickly. It could draw on huge amounts of data effortlessly. It wouldn't even take breaks to play Farmville. (See the best inventions of 2010.)

 

Probably. But it's impossible to predict the behavior of these smarter-than-human intelligences with which (with whom?) we might one day share the planet, because if you could, you'd be as smart as they would be. But there are a lot of theories about it. Maybe we'll merge with them to become super-intelligent cyborgs, using computers to extend our intellectual abilities the same way that cars and planes extend our physical abilities. Maybe the artificial intelligences will help us treat the effects of old age and prolong our life spans indefinitely. Maybe we'll scan our consciousnesses into computers and live inside them as software, forever, virtually. Maybe the computers will turn on humanity and annihilate us. The one thing all these theories have in common is the transformation of our species into something that is no longer recognizable as such to humanity circa 2011. This transformation has a name: the Singularity.

 

The difficult thing to keep sight of when you're talking about the Singularity is that even though it sounds like science fiction, it isn't, no more than a weather forecast is science fiction. It's not a fringe idea; it's a serious hypothesis about the future of life on Earth. There's an intellectual gag reflex that kicks in anytime you try to swallow an idea that involves super-intelligent immortal cyborgs, but suppress it if you can, because while the Singularity appears to be, on the face of it, preposterous, it's an idea that rewards sober, careful evaluation.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Cow goes moo: Artificial intelligence-based system associates images with sounds 

Cow goes moo: Artificial intelligence-based system associates images with sounds  | Big Data | Scoop.it
The cow goes 'moo.' The pig goes 'oink.' A child can learn from a picture book to associate images with sounds, but building a computer vision system that can train itself isn't as simple. Using artificial intelligence techniques, however, researchers at Disney Research and ETH Zurich have designed a system that can automatically learn the association between images and the sounds they could plausibly make.

Via Mariaschnee
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Scraping Google Scholar to write your PhD literature chapter

Scraping Google Scholar to write your PhD literature chapter | Big Data | Scoop.it

 This post is about a prototype ‘network’ approach to finding papers using data from Google Scholar, hopefully pointing to what could be done with more open data. I was able to use a supervised program searching on Google Scholar to extract my data, but a scalable version of this tool would require open data.


Via Carlos Lizarraga Celaya
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Size doesn’t matter in Big Data, it’s what you ask of it that counts

Size doesn’t matter in Big Data, it’s what you ask of it that counts | Big Data | Scoop.it
Big Data produces mountains of information, but it's useless for science unless we're asking the right questions.
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Bias Against Data & Evaluation Frameworks

Bias Against Data & Evaluation Frameworks | Big Data | Scoop.it
Why is there a bias against using data? And……What exactly is data? Is it a number, a unit, a quantity, a quality, a description, or all of the above?
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4 Easy Steps to Structure Highly Unstructured Big Data, via Automated Indexation

4 Easy Steps to Structure Highly Unstructured Big Data, via Automated Indexation | Big Data | Scoop.it
You have gathered gigabytes or terabytes of unstructured text, for instance scraping the Internet, or pieces of email from your employees or users, or tweets,…

Via Pierre Levy
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How Loyalty Programs Will Shape Mobile Payments

How Loyalty Programs Will Shape Mobile Payments | Big Data | Scoop.it
Loyalty programs are likely the underpinning of the adoption of mobile payments, so banks need to make sure reward points are part of their digital offerings.
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This audacious study will track 10,000 New Yorkers' every move for 20 years

This audacious study will track 10,000 New Yorkers' every move for 20 years | Big Data | Scoop.it
The Kavli HUMAN project wants to make an atlas of the human condition. Could its Big Data help us live longer, healthier lives?
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Big data could have saved ancient civilizations, and it could save us

Big data could have saved ancient civilizations, and it could save us | Big Data | Scoop.it
With big data, some ancient civilizations might have been able to identify and address problems and avoid their collapse.
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Neural networks are inadvertently learning our language’s hidden gender biases

Neural networks are inadvertently learning our language’s hidden gender biases | Big Data | Scoop.it
As neural networks tease apart the structure of language, they are finding a hidden gender bias that nobody knew was there.
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There’s no Big Data without intelligent interface

There’s no Big Data without intelligent interface | Big Data | Scoop.it
These reams of information are a remarkable new material of the 21st century – as important to our future as water.
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This Math Nerd Wants to Stop the Big Data Monster

This Math Nerd Wants to Stop the Big Data Monster | Big Data | Scoop.it
Financial reformer Cathy O’Neil learned the hard way that algorithms can produce terrible consequences.
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