Biblical Studies
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Biblical Studies
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The Complete Jewish Bible is Now Available!

The Complete Jewish Bible is Now Available! | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

We’re excited to announce that we’ve added a much-requested Bible to our online library: the Complete Jewish Bible!

 

The Complete Jewish Bible (CJB) is an English translation that contains both the Tanakh (Old Testament) and the B’rit Hadashah (New Covenant—the New Testament).

 

What we love about this unique translation is that it offers something to both Jewish and non-Jewish readers. Jewish readers are connected to the Jewish context and identity of the Messiah. And all readers will see more clearly the Jewish roots of the Christian faith—something that is often lost or minimized in translation.

 

What specifically is different about the Complete Jewish Bible? Among other things, names and key terms are returned to their original Hebrew and presented in easy-to-understand transliteration, making it easy to pronounce them the same way Yeshua (Jesus) did! For example, you’ll read Yerushalayim instead of Jerusalem; Torah instead of Law, and Yeshua instead of Jesus. You’ll notice plenty of other Hebrew words and phrases throughout the text—all of them easy to understand in context. Compare how the NIV and CJB use different transliterations of names and terms in Hebrews 7 to see how this reads.

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The Benefits of Understanding and Experiencing the Historical Geography of Israel

The Benefits of Understanding and Experiencing the Historical Geography of Israel | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

The findings of this study reveal that Christians who understand and experience the historical geography of Israel enjoy a clearer comprehension of the Bible, clearer direction to its application, and more effective communication of the text. In the realm of the spiritual life, historical geography provides a greater confidence in the Bible as God’s Word and instills a greater love for God and the Bible. Those who study historical geography, coupled with a study-trip to Israel, experience even greater benefits than those who study in the classroom alone.

 

The state of geographic apathy in the American church and seminary simply reflects the geographic illiteracy of its culture. Out of ten leading evangelical seminaries, seven offer only occasional elective courses on historical geography (some have not taught it for years), and not one seminary requires the subject. In addition, historical geography has not played a major role in our popular Bible study methods even though it offers a sizable contribution to biblical understanding.

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Discovering the Jerusalem from the time of Jesus

Discovering the Jerusalem from the time of Jesus | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Every wondered what Jerusalem looked like 2000 years ago? Archeological finds in the Jewish Quarter yield clues.

 

What did Jerusalem look like in Jesus' days? For most of Christian history, this question remained shrouded in mystery.

 

When the Temple and city were destroyed by the Romans in 70 A.D., the ruins remained buried for nearly two millennia - even after the Jewish People began to return to the Land of Israel at the end of the nineteenth century.

 

During the war of Independence (1948), the Jewish Quarter of the Old City was largely destroyed by the Jordanians and it remained off limits to Jews for 19 years, until Israel retook the Old City during the Six Day War (1967).

 

After the Six Day War, during the renovation of the Jewish Quarter (1967-82), the ancient site was uncovered, revealing spectacular finds: a luxurious Second Temple period residential quarter in the Upper City of Jerusalem.

 

Because of its grandeur and opulence, it was renamed the Herodian Quarter, also known today as the Wohl Museum of Archeology.

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400-year-old bible found in Palmerston North cupboard

400-year-old bible found in Palmerston North cupboard | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

A 400-year-old King James Bible has been found in a box at the bottom of a cupboard in Palmerston North, New Zealand.

 

The Bible, now fully restored, will be dedicated at a special service at St Peter's Anglican Church this Sunday before being put on permanent display.

 

Elizabeth Hopper said it was down to her late husband Keith Hopper that the Bible was found.

 

2011 was the 400th anniversary of the first edition of the King James Bible, and he was preparing an exhibition for the City Library.

 

He needed an old Bible, so into the church cupboards he went and that's when he found the Bible at the bottom of a box.

 

 

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N.T. Wright on the importance of reading the Gospels

I am not familiar with the organization promoting this video - but I am acquainted with the work of N.T. Wright.  His comments in the video on the importance of reading the Gospels are interesting and helpful.  I especially like the 'chips and dip' reference...

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The Mattanyahu Seal

The Mattanyahu Seal | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

The Israel Antiquities Authority has announced that a Hebrew seal bearing the name “Mattanyahu” has been discovered in Jerusalem in a site adjacent to the Western Wall of the Temple Mount. According to archaeologists, the site where the seal was found is the closest structure to the First Temple found to date in archaeological excavations.

 

According to a report released by the Israel Antiquities Authority, “The seal is made of a semi-precious stone and is engraved with the name of its owner: Lematanyahu Ben Ho… ( למתניהו בן הו meaning: “Belonging to Matanyahu Ben Ho…”). The rest of the inscription is erased.


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Rabbinic Literature and the Christian Scriptures: An Evolving Relationship

Rabbinic Literature and the Christian Scriptures:  An Evolving Relationship | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
What is the Talmud to the New Testament? Today, critical readers of the early Church typically recognize the Talmud and the other major treatises of the classical rabbinic literary tradition—the Mishnah, the Tosefta, and the works of the Midrash—as helpful comparative aids for the study of the Christian Scriptures.

 

Simply acknowledging that Jesus, Paul, and the evangelists operated within or close to the first-century Jewish society that incubated the rabbinic movement allows the critical reader to see with unprecedented clarity the differences of opinion as well as the areas of common concern that later came to define the Jewish and Christian faiths. One can only hope that the resulting convergence of contemporary Jewish and Christian critical interests in the world of the Christian Scriptures leads to ever more constructive conversations in years to come.

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Introduce Yourself to Bible Study with Logos

Introduce Yourself to Bible Study with Logos | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Can you relate to any of the following statements?

I want to learn to study the Bible.
I want to learn to use Logos Bible Software.
I want to understand Bible study resources like commentaries, concordances, and cross reference books.

 

If one (or all) of these statements apply to you, you need Introduction to Bible Study with Logos Bible Software.

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The Dead Sea Is Dying - Photo Essays

The Dead Sea Is Dying - Photo Essays | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Due to millions of gallons of water being diverted from its tributaries, the Dead Sea shows signs of drying up.
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Centuries-Old Gospel of John Bought by British Library for $14.3M

Centuries-Old Gospel of John Bought by British Library for $14.3M | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
A rare copy of the Gospel of John has been sold by the Jesuits to the British Library for $14.3 million and is said to be in "exquisite" condition despite being more than a thousand years old.

 

The book, which emanates from the seventh century, is written in Latin and was discovered over 900 years ago in the coffin of St. Cuthbert, who was buried with the book in 687.

 

The Gospel was discovered in 1104 after the saint's coffin was moved to Durham Cathedral to escape Viking raids during the ninth and 10th centuries.

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Sign up for Free Vision Audio Book: Gospels for the 21st Century

Sign up for Free Vision Audio Book: Gospels for the 21st Century | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Sign up today for Vision News, our email newsletter, and receive a free audiobook from Vision...

 

Sign up and download a few audio book: Vision Collections: Gospels for the 21st Century Audio Book

 

This fascinating journey through the Gospels will change your perceptions of Jesus and His original followers. It is the result of taking the New Testament at its word, reading it carefully for what it actually says. It weaves the four Gospel accounts into a single, compelling story--the story of Jesus Christ. Regardless of whether you are a believer in Jesus as the Messiah or just interested in learning more about His life and teaching, what follows may surprise you and open the door to a more accurate and enlightened reading.

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'God Is Not a Genie in a Bottle': Ways We Misuse the Bible

'God Is Not a Genie in a Bottle': Ways We Misuse the Bible | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

"Our temptation is to interpret the promises of God materially and temporally instead of spiritually and eternally. We Americans have bought into a materialistic, right-now mindset, and so we're tempted to pull verses out of context to fit that mindset. We need to understand that God's greatest desire is to glorify his name. Too often, we interpret God's promises in a way that is appealing to our sinful side. We often grab things out of Scripture and try to use them for our own benefit, instead of taking the necessary steps to submit to Scripture, to be humbled by it."

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Leadership and Forgiveness, Part 1

Leadership and Forgiveness, Part 1 | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
I have become convinced that there is one leadership principle upon which companies and families and fortunes balance, but it is totally misunderstood by today’s corporate and political leaders.

 

This principle is powerful enough that it has redirected many of our lives in an eternal way, yet it is so ignored in our daily living that its absence has torn apart companies, families, nations, and civilizations!

 

You’ve heard of it before. It is called forgiveness.

 

Please understand that this blog entry is not about our own forgiveness, the kind that comes freely from God when we ask for it.

 

That is a spiritual concept. I am calling attention to what we have in our control when we are lying awake at night thinking about a specific person and what he or she said or did and how we responded, and what we will say if we see them tomorrow!

 

You see, forgiveness is a decision—it is not an emotion.


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Sights and Insights: Studying the land

Sights and Insights: Studying the land | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Studying and experiencing the land of the Bible adds rich insight into one’s understanding of the Bible itself.

 

When one reads the Bible, it becomes clear how geography is the stage on which the redemptive narrative takes place.

 

The land God chose was not arbitrary, for He designed even the land itself to develop the spiritual lives of His people. One of God’s stated purposes in bringing the Hebrews from Egypt was to give them a land that fostered faith (Deuteronomy 11:10-15). The land was never intended to be just a place to live.

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Cultic shrines from time of King David

Cultic shrines from time of King David | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Hebrew University archaeologist Yosef Garfinkel finds first cultic evidence in Judah from the time of King David, with implications for Solomon's Temple.

 

Prof. Yosef Garfinkel, the Yigal Yadin Professor of Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, announced the discovery of objects that for the first time shed light on how a cult was organized in Judah at the time of King David.

 

During recent archaeological excavations at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a fortified city in Judah adjacent to the Valley of Elah, Garfinkel and colleagues uncovered rich assemblages of pottery, stone and metal tools, and many art and cult objects.

 

These include three large rooms that served as cultic shrines, which in their architecture and finds correspond to the biblical description of a cult at the time of King David.

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Quest for the Real Paul

Did Paul steal Christianity from Jesus to make it a world religion?

 

Journey along with Dr. David Hulme as he travels the Mediterranean region to the center of the Roman Empire and discover some of the myths and misconceptions that surround the apostle Paul and his teachings.

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The Real Indiana Jones

The Real Indiana Jones | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

What can archaeology prove or teach us about the Bible? What are its limitations?

 

TB: Archaeology illuminates the world of the Bible. The Bible was written to a contemporary audience, who didn’t need an explanation of what a house looked like, how a city gate functioned, or what types of tombs people were buried in. Its original readers knew all of this and much more. But today we live in a different world and culture, and archaeology helps to bridge the gap so that we can more properly understand the context in which the Bible was written. Archaeology cannot prove the Bible as a whole, but it can support and confirm the Bible’s records of events. Some people today think that the Bible was a myth written hundreds of years after the events it purports to describe, but archaeological evidence reveals the names of people and places that confirm that the Scriptures were written by first-hand witnesses. Archaeology cannot prove many aspects of the text, such as the faith of the people or the supernatural work of God. Furthermore, archaeology has a significant weakness: All discoveries are subject to a human interpreter, who is fallible. Many archaeological discoveries have been misinterpreted, both by those who believe the Scriptures and by those who deny them. This is the nature of the discipline of archaeology, and believers should not place too much confidence in the discoveries of archaeology per se because of the ambiguity involved in much of the evidence.

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9 Timeless Leadership Lessons from Cyrus the Great

9 Timeless Leadership Lessons from Cyrus the Great | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Cyrus The Great (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Forget 1-800-CEO Read. The greatest book on business and leadership was written in the 4th century BC by a Greek about a Persian King. Yeah, that's right.

 

Behold: Cyrus the Great, the man that historians call “the most amiable of conquerors,” and the first king to found “his empire on generosity” instead of violence and tyranny.

 

Consider Cyrus the antithesis to Machiavelli’s ideal Prince. The author, himself the opposite of Machiavelli, was Xenophon, a student of Socrates.

 

The book is a veritable classic in the art of leadership, execution, and responsibility. Adapted from Larry Hendrick’s excellent translation, here are nine lessons in leadership from Xenophon’s Cyrus the Great:...


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Q&A: Chorazin in the First Century

Q&A: Chorazin in the First Century | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

Question: How do you address the skeptic who argues that Chorazin did not exist in Jesus’ day? –J.H.

 

Answer: Two of the Gospels record that Jesus condemned Chorazin for its lack of faith (Matt 11:21; Luke 10:13). Scholars have identified Chorazin as Khirbet Karazeh, a site located two miles north of Capernaum, but excavations have not revealed remains earlier than the 2nd century AD. You’re asking if this contradicts the New Testament.

 

First, the incidental reference to Chorazin would hardly have been invented by a Gospel writer. One could potentially use the reference to argue that the Gospels were written only much later in the second century, but there is abundant evidence dating Matthew and Luke to the first century....

 

Read More: http://bit.ly/IzePxI

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Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity - Ancient Hebrew Poetry

Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity - Ancient Hebrew Poetry | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
One of the great achievements of scholarship of the last one hundred years has been the progressive recovery of a startling variety of Judaisms and Christianities with specific examples of the latter correctly defined as varieties of Judaism no...

 

Jesus’ teaching about almsgiving, prayer, fasting, and treasures in heaven as reported in Matthew 6:1-21 reflects this understanding but has been dismissed as inauthentic by some critics because the emphases enunciated are not dissimilar from those held by majority coeval Jewish teaching and later Christian teaching. To be blunt, that is an incompetent style of argument from a historical point of view.

 

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Codex Bezae - Cambridge Digital Library - University of Cambridge

Codex Bezae  - Cambridge Digital Library - University of Cambridge | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

Part of the Treasures of the Library Collection.

 

There are half-a-dozen ancient manuscripts which are the foundation of our understanding of the text of the New Testament writings. Among these stands the copy known since the sixteenth century as Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis. Any manuscript which has survived from antiquity is a marvel for this reason alone, and as we explore its pages, we have a rare opportunity to explore a little of the written culture of late antique Christianity. Although in the past century some remarkable papyrus manuscripts have been recovered from the sands of Egypt, their discovery has in general served more to highlight the significance of the parchment manuscripts than to diminish it.

 

Among this group, Codex Bezae occupies a unique place for several reasons. In the first place, as a bilingual manuscript, with a Greek text and a Latin version on facing pages, it provides a valuable insight into the reception of the Gospels and Acts in the western Christian tradition. The Latin version it contains is one of the small handful of manuscripts which are the most important witnesses to the development of a Latin version before Jerome's famous Vulgate of 382. Secondly, it provides a strikingly different form of text to that preserved in almost every other manuscript, and to the printed Greek text and the translations derived from it. These differences consist in the Gospels in frequent harmonisation of the text and in Acts in a free restyling of the text found best represented by Codex Vaticanus and reproduced in English translations.

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Next warden at Megiddo to be tourism expert

Next warden at Megiddo to be tourism expert | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Prison to make way for tourist center based on ruins of world's earliest Christian church.

 

A plan to relocate the Megiddo prison and build in its stead a tourist site featuring the remains of the world's most ancient Christian church is moving one step closer to fruition. An international tender is expected to be published in coming days, in an attempt to find an investor that will construct and manage the site. The price tag is an estimated NIS 26 million.

 

The investor who is chosen will enter a partnership with the Megiddo Development Economic Company, which has been tasked with the construction and management of the site. Several U.S. and Korean companies have reportedly expressed interest in the tender. Bids must be submitted by June 5.

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Was the Apostle Peter Sexist?

Was the Apostle Peter Sexist? | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

Did a sexist Peter intend women to be doormats to their husbands? When his words are read out of context, that erroneous assumption could be made. But in his instruction to husbands who are believers, Peter begins with the word likewise. The word is easily passed over; but Peter means “in the same way as wives,” as regards submission.

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Jesus Through Jewish Eyes

Jesus Through Jewish Eyes | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

For Christians and Jews both, it's always helpful to know the common roots of church and synagogue, to understand what we share and how we came to separate. The annotations, which draw from contemporaneous Jewish sources as well as discuss later rabbinic views on the topics in question, provide this information.


In working with Christian congregations and clergy groups, I find an enormous interest in Jesus' Jewish context—how the parables would have sounded in Jewish ears and what the controversy stories suggest about early Jewish practice. I think that if Christians want to take the Incarnation seriously, they should also take seriously where and when and to whom it occurred. ...

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