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N.T. Wright on the importance of reading the Gospels

I am not familiar with the organization promoting this video - but I am acquainted with the work of N.T. Wright.  His comments in the video on the importance of reading the Gospels are interesting and helpful.  I especially like the 'chips and dip' reference...

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The Mattanyahu Seal

The Mattanyahu Seal | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

The Israel Antiquities Authority has announced that a Hebrew seal bearing the name “Mattanyahu” has been discovered in Jerusalem in a site adjacent to the Western Wall of the Temple Mount. According to archaeologists, the site where the seal was found is the closest structure to the First Temple found to date in archaeological excavations.

 

According to a report released by the Israel Antiquities Authority, “The seal is made of a semi-precious stone and is engraved with the name of its owner: Lematanyahu Ben Ho… ( למתניהו בן הו meaning: “Belonging to Matanyahu Ben Ho…”). The rest of the inscription is erased.


Via Rob J Hyndman
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Rabbinic Literature and the Christian Scriptures: An Evolving Relationship

Rabbinic Literature and the Christian Scriptures:  An Evolving Relationship | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
What is the Talmud to the New Testament? Today, critical readers of the early Church typically recognize the Talmud and the other major treatises of the classical rabbinic literary tradition—the Mishnah, the Tosefta, and the works of the Midrash—as helpful comparative aids for the study of the Christian Scriptures.

 

Simply acknowledging that Jesus, Paul, and the evangelists operated within or close to the first-century Jewish society that incubated the rabbinic movement allows the critical reader to see with unprecedented clarity the differences of opinion as well as the areas of common concern that later came to define the Jewish and Christian faiths. One can only hope that the resulting convergence of contemporary Jewish and Christian critical interests in the world of the Christian Scriptures leads to ever more constructive conversations in years to come.

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Introduce Yourself to Bible Study with Logos

Introduce Yourself to Bible Study with Logos | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Can you relate to any of the following statements?

I want to learn to study the Bible.
I want to learn to use Logos Bible Software.
I want to understand Bible study resources like commentaries, concordances, and cross reference books.

 

If one (or all) of these statements apply to you, you need Introduction to Bible Study with Logos Bible Software.

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The Dead Sea Is Dying - Photo Essays

The Dead Sea Is Dying - Photo Essays | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Due to millions of gallons of water being diverted from its tributaries, the Dead Sea shows signs of drying up.
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Jerusalem | Filmed in Imax 3D. - YouTube

Spectaular...

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Centuries-Old Gospel of John Bought by British Library for $14.3M

Centuries-Old Gospel of John Bought by British Library for $14.3M | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
A rare copy of the Gospel of John has been sold by the Jesuits to the British Library for $14.3 million and is said to be in "exquisite" condition despite being more than a thousand years old.

 

The book, which emanates from the seventh century, is written in Latin and was discovered over 900 years ago in the coffin of St. Cuthbert, who was buried with the book in 687.

 

The Gospel was discovered in 1104 after the saint's coffin was moved to Durham Cathedral to escape Viking raids during the ninth and 10th centuries.

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Sign up for Free Vision Audio Book: Gospels for the 21st Century

Sign up for Free Vision Audio Book: Gospels for the 21st Century | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Sign up today for Vision News, our email newsletter, and receive a free audiobook from Vision...

 

Sign up and download a few audio book: Vision Collections: Gospels for the 21st Century Audio Book

 

This fascinating journey through the Gospels will change your perceptions of Jesus and His original followers. It is the result of taking the New Testament at its word, reading it carefully for what it actually says. It weaves the four Gospel accounts into a single, compelling story--the story of Jesus Christ. Regardless of whether you are a believer in Jesus as the Messiah or just interested in learning more about His life and teaching, what follows may surprise you and open the door to a more accurate and enlightened reading.

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'God Is Not a Genie in a Bottle': Ways We Misuse the Bible

'God Is Not a Genie in a Bottle': Ways We Misuse the Bible | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

"Our temptation is to interpret the promises of God materially and temporally instead of spiritually and eternally. We Americans have bought into a materialistic, right-now mindset, and so we're tempted to pull verses out of context to fit that mindset. We need to understand that God's greatest desire is to glorify his name. Too often, we interpret God's promises in a way that is appealing to our sinful side. We often grab things out of Scripture and try to use them for our own benefit, instead of taking the necessary steps to submit to Scripture, to be humbled by it."

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New Bible translation aims at 'own it but haven't read it' demo

By Stephen Walsh, CNN Professor David Capes says the Bible "is probably the most owned and least read book out there. That's because, for many, it's too difficult to understand.

 

The "own it but haven't read it" demographic is his target market, says Capes, who teaches the New Testament at Houston Baptist University and was part of a team that compiled "The Voice," a new translation of the King James Bible. Capes told CNN that the motivation behind the translation, seven years in the making, was to emphasize the meaning behind the words.

 

"'The Voice' considers the narrative links that help us to understand the drama and passion of story that is present in the original languages," according to the website for the book. "The tone of the writing, the format of the page, and the directness of the dialog allows the tradition of passing down the biblical narrative to come through in 'The Voice.'"

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Joshua's altar: the discovery that can't seem to overcome political obstacles

Joshua's altar: the discovery that can't seem to overcome political obstacles | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
In the place where Jewish tribes became a nation about 3,200 years ago, Professor Adam Zertal has collected surprising evidence of a biblical connection • "If you support a revolutionary idea," he says, "you sever yourself from the establishment."...

 

Indeed, 27 years since the sensational discovery of “Joshua’s altar” and approximately 20 years after it was made public, the world's most important Biblical archaeological site still lies shrouded in darkness. How many Israelis know about it? How many of them have visited it? This site is the Holy Grail of Biblical archaeology, the most significant site to be discovered in centuries. But it is significant not only scientifically and archaeologically. Rather, Zertal claims and proves through his knowledge that in that place, we became a nation 3,200 years ago, shortly after the Israelite tribes entered Canaan.

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BiblePlaces Blog: The Implications of an Altar on Mount Ebal

BiblePlaces Blog: The Implications of an Altar on Mount Ebal | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

I intended to ignore this article (as I do many others), because I doubt that the identification is accurate and this article in Israel Hayom is but a popular presentation of a discovery now 25 years old. So you’re not reading this here because I agree that the “altar” on Mount Ebal is “the world’s most important Biblical archaeological site” and the “the Holy Grail of Biblical archaeology.” But the article helpfully points out scholarly biases that affect interpretation.

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Evidence in Science and Religion, Part Two

Evidence in Science and Religion, Part Two | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Further discussion, with reader commentary, on what believers in religion and believers in scientific investigation have - and don't have - in common.

Via Peter Nathan
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The Real Indiana Jones

The Real Indiana Jones | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

What can archaeology prove or teach us about the Bible? What are its limitations?

 

TB: Archaeology illuminates the world of the Bible. The Bible was written to a contemporary audience, who didn’t need an explanation of what a house looked like, how a city gate functioned, or what types of tombs people were buried in. Its original readers knew all of this and much more. But today we live in a different world and culture, and archaeology helps to bridge the gap so that we can more properly understand the context in which the Bible was written. Archaeology cannot prove the Bible as a whole, but it can support and confirm the Bible’s records of events. Some people today think that the Bible was a myth written hundreds of years after the events it purports to describe, but archaeological evidence reveals the names of people and places that confirm that the Scriptures were written by first-hand witnesses. Archaeology cannot prove many aspects of the text, such as the faith of the people or the supernatural work of God. Furthermore, archaeology has a significant weakness: All discoveries are subject to a human interpreter, who is fallible. Many archaeological discoveries have been misinterpreted, both by those who believe the Scriptures and by those who deny them. This is the nature of the discipline of archaeology, and believers should not place too much confidence in the discoveries of archaeology per se because of the ambiguity involved in much of the evidence.

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9 Timeless Leadership Lessons from Cyrus the Great

9 Timeless Leadership Lessons from Cyrus the Great | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Cyrus The Great (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Forget 1-800-CEO Read. The greatest book on business and leadership was written in the 4th century BC by a Greek about a Persian King. Yeah, that's right.

 

Behold: Cyrus the Great, the man that historians call “the most amiable of conquerors,” and the first king to found “his empire on generosity” instead of violence and tyranny.

 

Consider Cyrus the antithesis to Machiavelli’s ideal Prince. The author, himself the opposite of Machiavelli, was Xenophon, a student of Socrates.

 

The book is a veritable classic in the art of leadership, execution, and responsibility. Adapted from Larry Hendrick’s excellent translation, here are nine lessons in leadership from Xenophon’s Cyrus the Great:...


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Q&A: Chorazin in the First Century

Q&A: Chorazin in the First Century | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

Question: How do you address the skeptic who argues that Chorazin did not exist in Jesus’ day? –J.H.

 

Answer: Two of the Gospels record that Jesus condemned Chorazin for its lack of faith (Matt 11:21; Luke 10:13). Scholars have identified Chorazin as Khirbet Karazeh, a site located two miles north of Capernaum, but excavations have not revealed remains earlier than the 2nd century AD. You’re asking if this contradicts the New Testament.

 

First, the incidental reference to Chorazin would hardly have been invented by a Gospel writer. One could potentially use the reference to argue that the Gospels were written only much later in the second century, but there is abundant evidence dating Matthew and Luke to the first century....

 

Read More: http://bit.ly/IzePxI

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Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity - Ancient Hebrew Poetry

Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity - Ancient Hebrew Poetry | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
One of the great achievements of scholarship of the last one hundred years has been the progressive recovery of a startling variety of Judaisms and Christianities with specific examples of the latter correctly defined as varieties of Judaism no...

 

Jesus’ teaching about almsgiving, prayer, fasting, and treasures in heaven as reported in Matthew 6:1-21 reflects this understanding but has been dismissed as inauthentic by some critics because the emphases enunciated are not dissimilar from those held by majority coeval Jewish teaching and later Christian teaching. To be blunt, that is an incompetent style of argument from a historical point of view.

 

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Codex Bezae - Cambridge Digital Library - University of Cambridge

Codex Bezae  - Cambridge Digital Library - University of Cambridge | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

Part of the Treasures of the Library Collection.

 

There are half-a-dozen ancient manuscripts which are the foundation of our understanding of the text of the New Testament writings. Among these stands the copy known since the sixteenth century as Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis. Any manuscript which has survived from antiquity is a marvel for this reason alone, and as we explore its pages, we have a rare opportunity to explore a little of the written culture of late antique Christianity. Although in the past century some remarkable papyrus manuscripts have been recovered from the sands of Egypt, their discovery has in general served more to highlight the significance of the parchment manuscripts than to diminish it.

 

Among this group, Codex Bezae occupies a unique place for several reasons. In the first place, as a bilingual manuscript, with a Greek text and a Latin version on facing pages, it provides a valuable insight into the reception of the Gospels and Acts in the western Christian tradition. The Latin version it contains is one of the small handful of manuscripts which are the most important witnesses to the development of a Latin version before Jerome's famous Vulgate of 382. Secondly, it provides a strikingly different form of text to that preserved in almost every other manuscript, and to the printed Greek text and the translations derived from it. These differences consist in the Gospels in frequent harmonisation of the text and in Acts in a free restyling of the text found best represented by Codex Vaticanus and reproduced in English translations.

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Next warden at Megiddo to be tourism expert

Next warden at Megiddo to be tourism expert | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Prison to make way for tourist center based on ruins of world's earliest Christian church.

 

A plan to relocate the Megiddo prison and build in its stead a tourist site featuring the remains of the world's most ancient Christian church is moving one step closer to fruition. An international tender is expected to be published in coming days, in an attempt to find an investor that will construct and manage the site. The price tag is an estimated NIS 26 million.

 

The investor who is chosen will enter a partnership with the Megiddo Development Economic Company, which has been tasked with the construction and management of the site. Several U.S. and Korean companies have reportedly expressed interest in the tender. Bids must be submitted by June 5.

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Was the Apostle Peter Sexist?

Was the Apostle Peter Sexist? | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

Did a sexist Peter intend women to be doormats to their husbands? When his words are read out of context, that erroneous assumption could be made. But in his instruction to husbands who are believers, Peter begins with the word likewise. The word is easily passed over; but Peter means “in the same way as wives,” as regards submission.

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Jesus Through Jewish Eyes

Jesus Through Jewish Eyes | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

For Christians and Jews both, it's always helpful to know the common roots of church and synagogue, to understand what we share and how we came to separate. The annotations, which draw from contemporaneous Jewish sources as well as discuss later rabbinic views on the topics in question, provide this information.


In working with Christian congregations and clergy groups, I find an enormous interest in Jesus' Jewish context—how the parables would have sounded in Jewish ears and what the controversy stories suggest about early Jewish practice. I think that if Christians want to take the Incarnation seriously, they should also take seriously where and when and to whom it occurred. ...

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Out of Egypt: Archaeologists find ancient scarab in Jerusalem

Out of Egypt: Archaeologists find ancient scarab in Jerusalem | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Rare Egyptian artifact dates back to the 13th century B.C.E., the era when some scholars speculate the Exodus may have occurred • Scarab bears name, in Egyptian writing, of the sun god Amon-Ra, one of Egypt's most important deities.

 

Just in time for Passover, Israeli archaeologists have found a rare Egyptian artifact in Jerusalem. An Egyptian scarab, dating back to the 13th century B.C.E. (the era when some scholars speculate the Exodus may have occurred) was uncovered on Thursday at an excavation sponsored by the Israel Antiquities Authority at the City of David National Park.

 

The seal is about a centimeter and a half in length and was used to stamp documents.

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Ancient Inscription Refers to Birth of Israelite Monarchy

Ancient Inscription Refers to Birth of Israelite Monarchy | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

The use of the word “established” seems to indicate that the king ascended to the throne by the establishment of his monarchy rather than by familial succession. Given the provenance of the find—a Judahite fortress—only two possibilities seem available: David or Saul. Puech leans toward Saul—the first Israelite king.


According to the Bible, Saul was chosen by the high priest Samuel to rule over the Israelites. Saul, who, together with three of his sons, died on the battlefield at Mt. Gilboa, was not succeeded on the Israelite throne by any of his descendants, but by David the son of Jesse of the tribe of Judah. Puech dates the beginning of Saul’s reign to approximately 1030 B.C.E., and David’s to approximately 1010 B.C.E.

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Mount Ebal - by A. Zertal

Mount Ebal - by A. Zertal | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

Archaeological surveys are no easy task. They involve combing an area on foot, day after day, month after month, in order to map and register all sites in the area. All the historical sites known to us were discovered because of ancient traditions handed down from generation to generation, or by accident, or as a result of systematic archaeological survey. Over the millennia sites have been forsaken and cities abandoned and destroyed, and their names have often fallen into oblivion. Many a time an archaeologist faces the difficult riddle of discovering the name of a lost city or identifying the people who inhabited it.


Via Peter Nathan
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Dr. James Strange on the Use of Texts by Archaeologists

From VISION MEDIA PRODUCTIONS. Professor James Strange of the University of South Florida discusses the appropriate usage of texts in archeology, an approach that appears to be avoided by those who see archeology as purely an anthropological pursuit.

 

Strange was recorded at the Annual Meeting of ASOR (American Schools of Oriental Research) in San Diego, November 2007.

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