Biblical Studies
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Biblical Studies
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Inside the house of Herod: Israeli exhibition sheds light on the home life of the biblical king who tried to kill the baby Jesus

Inside the house of Herod: Israeli exhibition sheds light on the home life of the biblical king who tried to kill the baby Jesus | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
The exhibition offers a glimpse in to the palace of King Herod (centre bottom), including his bath (top left) and a bust of the Roman Emperor who ruled at the time (right).

Via Rob J Hyndman
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The private household of King Herod has been laid bare in a new exhibition being held at a museum in Israel.


Herod the Great: The King's Final Journey at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem features exhibits that offer an intriguing glimpse into the home life of the divisive figure, including his bath and the decorations that adorned his palace.

The 250 artifacts were excavated over a period of 40 years at Herodium, the builder-king's excavated palace on an arid hilltop a short drive from Jerusalem.




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Top UK universities to buy Lewis-Gibson Genizah

Top UK universities to buy Lewis-Gibson Genizah | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Collection, worth £1.2 million significant historical resource of manuscripts in Arabic and Hebrew dated from ninth century.

Via Peter Nathan
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Peter Nathan's curator insight, February 10, 2013 10:59 PM

add this to the Taylor-Schenker Collection in Cambridge and the majority of the Genizah is back together in one place.

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On the Immortality of the Soul

On the Immortality of the Soul | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Religious faiths of all descriptions have something to say about an afterlife, with most teaching that as humans we possess an immortal soul.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Most religions teach that after death, a soul within us leaves the body and lives on for eternity. Many people assume it is also a biblical belief, but is it? What exactly is the history of this idea?

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Law, Prophets and Writings

Law, Prophets and Writings | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

This series  covers the section of Old Testament Hebrew Scriptures known as the Law,Prophets and Writings.

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Series Index: The Gospels for the 21st Century

Series Index: The Gospels for the 21st Century | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
In this series, David Hulme examines the life and teachings of Jesus as recorded in the Gospels and discusses their relevance to the modern world.
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Red Sea-Dead Sea link feasible, World Bank says

Red Sea-Dead Sea link feasible, World Bank says | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

It is possible to use the Red Sea to replenish the shrinking Dead Sea, the World Bank has determined after years of studying whether such a connecting lifeline could work.

 

The idea of linking the two bodies of water has been around for more than a century, but the project took on a new urgency when the shore of the Dead Sea was found to be receding at a rate of more than one meter (3.3 feet) every year.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The Dead Sea, technically a lake, is a tourist spot famous for its salty waters that allow bathers to float. Its mineral rich mud, used for skin treatment, is sold around the world.

 

But as the population increased in the region, water was diverted from the Jordan river, the Dead Sea's natural water source, for drinking and agriculture.

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Temple and rare cache of sacred vessels from Biblical times discovered at Tel Motza (December 2012)

Temple and rare cache of sacred vessels from Biblical times discovered at Tel Motza (December 2012) | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

The finds, dated to the early monarchic period and including pottery figurines of men and horses, provide rare testimony of a ritual cult in the Jerusalem region at the beginning of the period of the monarchy. 

They were uncovered during excavations by the Israel Antiquities Authority, prior to work by the National Roads Company on the new Highway 1 section.


Via Peter Nathan
donhornsby's insight:

Rare evidence of the religious practices and rituals in the early days of the Kingdom of Judah has recently been discovered at Tel Motza, to the west of Jerusalem.

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Insight: Truth or Tradition?

It's long been known that Jesus was not born in 1 AD, nor was he born on December 25th. Tradition has had a major influence on many religious practices. But is tradition a reliable guide to truth?
donhornsby's insight:

When it comes to the Bible, how much do we get right?

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The Antonia Fortress in Jerusalem | Ritmeyer Archaeological Design

The Antonia Fortress in Jerusalem | Ritmeyer Archaeological Design | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
donhornsby's insight:

 Leen Ritmeyer' blog: "Renovation work is being carried out in the north of the Temple Mount. Large blue drapes cover part of the Antonia Rockscarp and razor-sharp barbed wire has closed off the area." He suggests the location where Paul addressed the people in Acts 22

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Rest: A Priceless Gift

Rest: A Priceless Gift | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Is sleep all that we need to recharge our batteries? Or do we need a deeper source of renewal?

 

While it may go against the grain, taking a day to rest may not be as difficult to do as one might think. It simply requires putting down the week’s burden for a day.


It may seem like a simple, physical act—but the benefits are more than physical. The exercise of putting aside our weekly concerns and stresses to focus on our family and spiritual relationships can keep us on a path of regular renewal that has the power to transform our lives.

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Insight: Jerusalem - At Peace or in Pieces?

Jerusalem remains a crucial factor in the Middle East and in world politics. The Old City is often at the center of angry clashes between Palestinians and Israelis as each tries to defend ground sacred to their religious tradition.

 

The name Jerusalem means "City of Peace".  But will the city ever live up to its name?


Via Seth Capo
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Olive trees of Gethsemane among oldest in world: study

Olive trees of Gethsemane among oldest in world: study | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
VATICAN CITY (Reuters) - Olive trees in the Jerusalem garden revered by Christians as the place where Jesus Christ prayed before he was crucified have been dated to at least 900 years old, a study released...

 

Olive trees in the Jerusalem garden revered by Christians as the place where Jesus Christ prayed before he was crucified have been dated to at least 900 years old, a study released on Friday showed.

 

The results of tests on trees in the Garden of Gethsemane have not settled the question of whether the gnarled trees are the very same which sheltered Jesus, where the Bible says he prayed and was later betrayed by Judas, because olive trees can grow back from roots after being cut down, researchers said.

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The Religious Brain: A Default Setting?

The Religious Brain: A Default Setting? | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
New research suggests that we may indeed be "built" for belief.

 

For some time on my podcast Point of Inquiry, I've been doing occasional shows that explore what you might call the "innateness" of human religiosity--or in other words, why the way our brains are built can turn scientific thinking into a kind of also-ran.

 

In one program, for instance, I spoke with Emory University cognitive scientist Robert McCauley about his book Why Religion is Natural and Science is Not, which argues that our minds, from very early on, are geared towards certain tendencies that privilege religious belief over critical thinking.

 

In another show, meanwhile, I spoke with psychologist Will Gervais about how a more basic and intuitive cognitive style, one that comes to us quite naturally, promotes religious belief.


Via Dimitris Agorastos, David Hain
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Daily Devotion: The Legacy of the Protestant Work Ethic

Daily Devotion: The Legacy of the Protestant Work Ethic | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
The Western world's obsession with work has a long history. But on what is it founded?

 

Are we too leisure oriented, or is our cyber world turning us into workaholics? Has technology brought lasting benefits to workers? Should employment cut so deeply into personal time and family life? These and other questions arise often and illustrate the controversy that surrounds what we do most: work. To understand why we face such issues today, it’s helpful to rehearse some recent history to uncover the roots of our modern concept of work.

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donhornsby's curator insight, February 14, 2013 6:59 AM

(From the article): As secularism became an important aspect of American society alongside religion, it contributed to the nation’s growing pluralistic culture.

 

Today the tension is about which worldview should dominate public life. Humanists pursue the marginalization of religious values, while the religiously inclined, and particularly those with strong Calvinistic roots, believe all private and public activity should be governed by sacred values. Nevertheless, for most, the connection between work and a person’s calling has been severed. Work in today’s cultural setting is firmly attached to secular values.

Doris Garcia's curator insight, July 28, 2015 3:55 PM

Good summary of how important figures in the history of Protestantism understood work from a theological perspective. The author shares some criticism and a valuable rule for employees and employers based on "love your neighbors as yourself." 

Ajarn Don P's curator insight, July 28, 2015 11:58 PM

I have been thinking on a topic "The meaning of work and employment for persons with disabilities: Challenges for rehabilitative counseling."  Moving from begging to productive life without relapse requires a redifining of work.  In this regard I look to the sense of calling (personal identity formation), income production and social inclusion as meaningful work.  I then consider the role of occupational rehab counselors working with persons with disabilities.

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Dr. Richard Bauckham & Dr. Ben Witherington on the Book of Revelation

In this Seedbed interview, Dr. Ben Witherington speaks with Dr. Richard Bauckham about the book of Revelation. 

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Insight Video: The Bible: Treasure or Trash?

Insight Video: The Bible: Treasure or Trash? | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
Judeo-Christian thinking based on the Bible underpins Western society. Yet today, few know or understand what the Bible says. Is it still relevant?
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Series Index: The Apostles

Series Index: The Apostles | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
This series of articles by David Hulme studies the disciples of Jesus and the founding of what is often called the first christian church.
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Touring Israel in Google Street View

Touring Israel in Google Street View | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

Google has rolled out a rather substantial Street View update this morning, covering hundreds of towns in Israel and updating various other cities across the world. Some of the highlights include the Sea of Galilee, the Western Wall and the Bet She'an National Park. 


donhornsby's insight:

Interesting.  

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Eytan Magen's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:22 AM

Technology and History  - the Israel Story!!

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Are Men Anti-Church?

Are Men Anti-Church? | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
The absence of men in churches is not a new phenomenon. Several scholars and church leaders have noticed and addressed the trend.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The absence of men in churches is not a new phenomenon, nor is it confined to a few English-speaking nations. The trend has been commonly observed and accepted as unremarkable throughout the Western world. But why? Are men just less “religious” than women? Less easily persuaded? More logically minded and therefore less easily convinced?

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KIng Herod Exhibit at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem

KIng Herod Exhibit at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

If you plan to visit Jerusalem in 2013, you should go to the Israel Museum and see what promises to be a fascinating exhibition on King Herod the Great that will run from February till October. CNN put up an interesting video about the exhibit:


Via Rob J Hyndman
donhornsby's insight:

I would love to be able to see this one....

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The Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library

The Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) is very proud to present the Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library, a free online digitized virtual library of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Hundreds of manuscripts made up of thousands of fragments – discovered from 1947 and until the early 1960’s in the Judean Desert along the western shore of the Dead Sea – are now available to the public online. The high resolution images are extremely detailed and can be accessed through various search options on the site.
donhornsby's insight:

This is a fascinating resource for anyone interested in the Dead Seas Scrolls.

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Remnants of Hasmonean-era community found under Jerusalem road

Remnants of Hasmonean-era community found under Jerusalem road | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
A salvage dig meant to allow the construction of a new light rail line uncovers a farm society active around the time of the heroes of Hanukkah
donhornsby's insight:

The community seems to have been active both before and after the Maccabees took Jerusalem and re-dedicated the Temple in 164 BCE, marking the beginning of Hasmonean rule, according to the IAA.

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Happiness is most readily achieved in community

Happiness is most readily achieved in community | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it

Happiness, like friendship, trust, altruism, virtue, enduring values and real relationships, is most readily achieved in community, and in an age when face-to-face communities are elsewhere in steep decline, in houses of worship they are still strong.

 

So ignore the world of brands and bling, and consider joining a religious congregation. Unlike the culture of glossy surfaces and glittering superficiality, it’s the real thing.

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The Law, the Prophets and the Writings, Part 4: Heir of the World

The Law, the Prophets and the Writings, Part 4: Heir of the World | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
This study of Genesis highlights various episodes in the patriarch Abraham’s life following God’s promise to make a great nation of his descendants.

 

In tracing the life of Abraham, we have arrived in our study of Genesis at chapter 15 and the fourth time God made contact with him. Previously God had stated that he would become a great nation and receive Canaan as the Land of Promise (12:1–7; 13:14–17).

 

Now the encounter was to reconfirm the promise of an heir and descendants. In the aftermath of the battle with the four invading kings, God reminded Abram that he should not be afraid, because He was his shield or protector. For the first time Abram addressed God as Adonai Yahweh (“Lord God,” 15:2), and he reminded Him that several years after the initial promise he still had no child. He brought this to God, noting that at this point his heir could only be Eliezer of Damascus, a servant born in his house. God replied that Abram would indeed have his own natural heir and that his descendants would be as innumerable as the stars (verse 5). This is one of God’s three ways of describing the expansion of the patriarch’s progeny. Others are as “dust” (13:16) and “sand” (22:17).

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Down in the Patriarch’s Pool

Down in the Patriarch’s Pool | Biblical Studies | Scoop.it
A Little Night Music in Old Jerusalem I am not much given to hyperbole and superlatives, but it occurs to me that a recent event conducted in the Old City represents an absolute first in Jerusalem ...

 

This post serves very much as a follow-up to my previous offerings tracking the progress of the clean-up of this site starting in June 2011, HERE, HERE, and HERE. Reviewing my previous reporting, I was struck by the fact that the basic clean-up, during which a huge volume of debris was removed, took only about two months! Then last winter I was monitoring the renewed accumulation of rainwater and the seemingly futile efforts to manage it (see photo below). Throughout, I wondered what would become of the newly-cleared space, how it would be used — and by whom. Now, it seems some of those questions are being answered.

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