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Rescooped by Gianfranco D'Aversa from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning

The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning | Better teaching, more learning | Scoop.it
The Importance Of Intrinsic Motivation In Transforming Learning

 

Giving teachers and students as much autonomy as possible in choosing their own curricular material is another way that we can improve student engagement.

 

Only students who are intrinsically motivated to be engaged in school will end up truly challenged, enriched, energized and ultimately fulfilled by their experience. Yes it’s an ideal, but it’s worth keeping in mind.

 


Via Gust MEES
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Sharrock's comment, May 1, 2014 11:54 AM
You should take a look at this link: http://www.maccoby.com/Articles/4Rs_Of_Motivation.shtml. Maccoby states there is a mix of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards: "mix of four Rs: Responsibilities, Relationships, Rewards, Reasons". Maccoby's paragraph on responsibilities focuses on the intrinsics--"People are motivated when their responsibilities are meaningful and engage their abilities and values." Meaning is something personal, ie intrinsic. He also discussed personal challenges when he said, "Craftsmen are motivated by the challenge to produce high–quality products." I liken this to an artist's aesthetics for creating art.
In his section on "Relationships", I wonder if the quality of a relationship is an extrinsic reward/acknowledgement or intrinsic or a mixture of both.
In the part about "Rewards", he does the most exploration of extrinsic rewards, namely about "pay", but he also states, "However, Jönsson finds that 80–85 percent of people who receive recognition for a job well done are satisfied even if it is not monetary, compared to 45–50 percent of those who are not recognized for their work." Which is along the lines of what I was saying about acknowledgements. They are more highly valued, but still extrinsic.
Finally, in his section "Reasons", Maccoby notes, "Jönsson reports that Chinese workers are especially motivated because they have a sense that they work not only for themselves, but also for their country. They feel proud of being part of a winning team that is building a powerful economy. According to Jönsson, in China more than in the West, workers are interested in and aware of their company’s vision, and they see their own work in this larger context." This again is mixing intrinsics and extrinsics.
Sharrock's comment, May 1, 2014 11:55 AM
If you relate "grades" to pay, it really doesn't matter. Pay only matters when the 4 Rs are inadequate or dissatisfying. Grades are not the problem just as salary is not usually the problem.
Sharrock's comment, May 1, 2014 11:55 AM
If you relate "grades" to pay, it really doesn't matter. Pay only matters when the 4 Rs are inadequate or dissatisfying. Grades are not the problem just as salary is not usually the problem.
Rescooped by Gianfranco D'Aversa from Technology in Education for CHS Teachers
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Gaming in the Classroom: Why Bring Electronic Games into the Classroom?

Gaming in the Classroom: Why Bring Electronic Games into the Classroom? | Better teaching, more learning | Scoop.it

Does gaming have a place in the classroom? The information on this infographic provides reasons why gaming should be in the classroom (with resources provided on the infographic). A few of the reasons discussed are:
* The students love games and are familiar with them.

* The students are engaged. "Computer games stimulate the brain to produce dopamine" which helps with attention and making connections.

* Student are motivated by games.

For more information check out the infographic!


Via Beth Dichter, Joanne Crooks
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Andrea Piccione's curator insight, January 7, 5:13 PM

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