Better teaching, more learning
22.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Better teaching, more learning
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Gianfranco D'Aversa from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

How Coaching Can Impact Teachers, Principals, and Students

How Coaching Can Impact Teachers, Principals, and Students | Better teaching, more learning | Scoop.it

 

Finally, the Annenberg report determined that coaching supports collective leadership across a school system. An essential feature of coaching is that it uses the relationships between coaches, principals, and teachers to create the conversation that leads to behavioral, pedagogical, and content knowledge change.

 

Effective coaching distributes leadership and keeps the focus on teaching and learning. This focus promotes the development of leadership skills, professional learning, and support for teachers that target ways to improve student outcomes...

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Stephen Basden's comment, September 12, 2013 8:30 PM
What I learned from this article is how a good coach on the field, can help a student's performance in the classroom. Strong and successful sports programs create atmospheres on campuses that help success in the classroom. Principles should take this into mind when hiring a coach. They can't just hire somebody with a good playbook but rather role models and well respected individuals that will create young men and women who challenge themselves outside of sports.

In this particular article, what I found most educational is when the author said "Coaching is an essential component of an effective professional development program. Coaching can build will, skill, knowledge, and capacity because it can go where no other professional development has gone before: into the intellect, behaviors, practices, beliefs, values, and feelings of an educator. " This is such a powerful statement. I have for years personally seen how coaching affects an individual. I had a football coach in high school that demanded the best from us not just on the field but in the classroom and as a person. This coach meant a lot to me, he was very knowledgeable, successful, and well respected that I treated his word like gospel. During the season I actually saw an increase in grades and personally happiness. Coaches can have a personal relationship with their players that no teacher, principle, or other faculty member can imitate. Sports is a powerful tool and when used correctly can change lives; not only of that individual but his peers too.

I selected because the title really grabbed my attention. Often times we hear how sports can really help a student or employee in their respective environments so I thought it was really interesting to see an article on how teachers can also benefit from sports. A good sports program directly translate into a good academic program at an institution.

This article gave me even more of an understanding on exactly how much sports affect all aspects of life. Sports go way beyond the playing field, they carry over into relationships and even occupations. Everything in life you do that isn't individual, needs teamwork. Whether that be wife and husband or employee and employer, sports have and continue to prove that teamwork gets things done the best. Sacrificing personal agendas to achieve greater goals is a must and sports have taught us this over the years.
Gust MEES's comment, September 12, 2013 8:36 PM
Hi, I agree with You. These parts from sports are influencing widely in life and education!
Andrea Cruz's curator insight, September 29, 2013 9:56 PM

Focus on teaching and learning when coaching....

Rescooped by Gianfranco D'Aversa from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

'Coaching' as a staff Professional Development Tool

'Coaching' as a staff Professional Development Tool | Better teaching, more learning | Scoop.it

By Craig KEMP:

 

'Coaching' as a staff Professional Development Tool This year my school has introduced a 'Coaching' scheme for staff in an attempt to help staff develop their strengths and weaknesses in an internally driven and supported manner. We run on a Australian School year so it runs from January - December. We have had a magnificent start to the New Year and this new process was introduced to all staff during our professional development days in January. 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Rescooped by Gianfranco D'Aversa from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Critical Friends: The Benefits of Instructional Coaches

Critical Friends: The Benefits of Instructional Coaches | Better teaching, more learning | Scoop.it

 

Instructional coaches seem to be a new phenomenon in schools. Their job is to help educators become better teachers. They observe teachers teaching, go over instructional data, and model good teaching practices. As much as this may be new for schools, the core of instructional coaching has been around for a long time.


Via Gust MEES
more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, March 21, 2013 4:43 PM

"Knights says instructional coaches employ the following seven practices:
• Enrolls the teacher - they conduct one-to-one interviews with each teacher prior to the experience. 
• Engages in collaborative planning - The coach meets with the collaborating teacher to discuss how a new teaching practice can be implemented effectively. 
• Models the lesson- The coach must model the lesson in the collaborating teacher's classroom while the teacher observes. 
• Teacher-directed post conference - Both parties must meet to discuss what the teacher observed the coach doing while modeling the lesson. 
• Coach observes the lesson- It's the teacher's turn to teach the lesson. 
• Exploring data together - The coach and teacher discuss the data gathered during mutual observations. 
• Providing continued support - This is a continuous relationship that needs to be fostered over the year."


I am eager to keep practicing effective coaching.  Fidelity is an on-going issue.  

Rachelle Wooten's comment, March 23, 2013 6:10 PM
This was a great read! This is mostly what I do. These practices for Knight will help me more consistent in my quality of service. I plan to begin doing research of my own to assess the impact of ed tech coaching.
Rachelle Wooten's curator insight, March 23, 2013 6:11 PM

This was a great read! This is mostly what I do. These practices for Knight will help me more consistent in my quality of service. I plan to begin doing research of my own to assess the impact of ed tech coaching.

Rescooped by Gianfranco D'Aversa from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

The Lasting Impact of Instructional Coaching

The Lasting Impact of Instructional Coaching | Better teaching, more learning | Scoop.it

Cause-Effect Coaching

 

David uses a “cause-effect coaching” method.  He shows teachers what they are doing or are not doing (the cause) and how it is related to what the students are learning or not learning (the effect).

The purpose is to show the teacher that the students may not be the cause of why the students are not learning.

 

The cause-effect concept was shown in the original work on classroom management by Jacob Kounin.  He summarized his research from observing teachers and classrooms and concluded that it was “the behavior of the teacher and not the behavior of the students that resulted in student learning.”

 

David says:

 

==> “School leaders and teachers must always examine how their actions or inactions may be creating barriers or creating enhancements to learning.” <==

 

 

 


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Gust MEES
Gianfranco D'Aversa's insight:

Cause-Effect Coaching

 

David uses a “cause-effect coaching” method.  He shows teachers what they are doing or are not doing (the cause) and how it is related to what the students are learning or not learning (the effect).

The purpose is to show the teacher that the students may not be the cause of why the students are not learning.

 

The cause-effect concept was shown in the original work on classroom management by Jacob Kounin.  He summarized his research from observing teachers and classrooms and concluded that it was “the behavior of the teacher and not the behavior of the students that resulted in student learning.”

 

David says:

 

==> “School leaders and teachers must always examine how their actions or inactions may be creating barriers or creating enhancements to learning.

more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 17, 2013 11:32 PM

Learn more about cause-effect coaching.  If it doesn't last, it's just a distraction.  

Gust MEES's curator insight, January 20, 2013 4:57 PM

Very interesting, a MUST read...