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What Professional Fields are Ready for MOOC Disruption? - MOOCs - Think Massively

What Professional Fields are Ready for MOOC Disruption? - MOOCs - Think Massively | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

In a recent article at The Evolllution, Advanced Informatics Director of Business Development Matt Jensen explores the relationship between MOOCs and industry. He notes the convergence of several factors that are fueling the growing relationship: MOOC providers facing pressure to make money, companies looking for new ways to recruit and train employees, MOOC awareness growing, and professionals interested in increasing their skill sets.


Via Peter Mellow
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Moodle Best LMS
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To MOOC or not to MOOC - That is the question

CEG Presentations, 18 March 2014

Via Ramon Aragon, Juergen Wagner, Peter Mellow, Miloš Bajčetić
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Didactics and Technology in Education
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Connectivism and Connective Knowledge ~ Stephen Downes

by Stephen Downes

 

"Eight years ago George Siemens coined the term ‘Connectivism’ to describe learning networks1 and has been generous enough to share it with me. This volume represents the bulk of my contribution to the field since then.

 

"Connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and  therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks. An account of connectivism is therefore necessarily preceded by an account of networks. But the bulk of this work is devoted to tracing the implications of this thesis in learning.

 

"Yes, this could have been a shorter book – and perhaps one day I’ll author a volume without the redundancies, false starts, detours and asides, and other miscellany. Such a volume would be sterile, however, and it feels more true to the actual enquiry to stay true to the original blog posts, essays and presentations that constitute this work.
Here is the abridged version of my philosophy, for those not wishing to read the 600 or so pages that follow:

 

"The scope of my work covers three major domains, knowledge, learning and community. Each of these represents an aspect of network theory: the first, examining the cognitive properties of networks, the second, looking at how networks learn, and the third, tracing the properties of effective networks. These also represent the processes of learning, inference and discovery in society writ large."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Downes is one of the deepest thinkers around on networked learning. This 600-page e-book is a compilation of a great deal of his writing. Published in 2012, I just came across it on his website. The book is a free download.


Via Jim Lerman, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Interactive Teaching and Learning
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Evaluating Tools in the Higher Ed Classroom: What Works

This presentation was delivered at the Nevada Conference on Digital Learning in Las Vegas on Sunday 12 April, 2014.

Via Anne Whaits
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Anne Whaits's curator insight, May 27, 4:39 AM

This presentation reflects on a case study that links digital tools use alongside four pedagogies within a faculty at an HE institution.

Christoph Meier's curator insight, May 27, 11:11 PM

Interessante Präsentation, die die Verwendung von online Werkzeugen mit Theorien des Lehrens & Lernens in Verbindung bringt.

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from The 21st Century
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Timeline of Educational Technology in Schools Infographic | e-Learning Infographics

Timeline of Educational Technology in Schools Infographic | e-Learning Infographics | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The Timeline of Educational Technology in Schools Infographic shows how educational technology has evolved in schools over the past 114 years.

Via Susan Bainbridge
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DennisRFreitas's curator insight, May 27, 8:49 PM

Just thought this was a real cool timeline. 

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Collaboration and Cooperation - by Stephen Downes

Stephen Downes: "In this presentation I revisit some of my work on 'groups and networks' to draw out the distinction between cooperation and collaboration for this mass collaboration workshop. I argue that mass collaboration may be impossible to achieve, and show how we employed a principle of mass cooperation to support massive open online courses (MOOCs). I also introduced new terminology, using the term 'collective' to describe what I have been calling 'groups', and 'connectives' to describe what I have been calling networks"

 

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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A balanced research report on the hopes and realities of MOOCs

A balanced research report on the hopes and realities of MOOCs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The authors used interviews with over 80 individuals covering 62 institutions ‘active in the MOOCspace’, cost analysis, and analysis of other research on MOOCs to support their findings. They identified six goals from the 29 institutions in the study that offered MOOCs, with following analysis of success or otherwise in accomplishing such goals:

1. Extending reach (65% 0f the 29 institutions)

Data from MOOC platforms indicate that MOOCs are providing educational opportunities to millions of individuals across the world. However, most MOOC participants are already well-educated and employed, and only a small fraction of them fully engages with the courses. Overall, the evidence suggests that MOOCs are currently falling far short of “democratizing” education and may, for now, be doing more to increase gaps in access to education than to diminish them.

2. Building and maintaining brand (41%)

While many institutions have received significant media attention as a result of their MOOC activities, isolating and measuring impact of any new initiative on brand is a difficult exercise. Most institutions are only just beginning to think about how to capture and quantify branding-related benefits.

3. Reducing costs or increasing revenues (38%)

….revenue streams for MOOCs are slowly materializing but we do not expect the costs of MOOC production to fall significantly given the highly labor-intensive nature of the process. While these costs may be amortized across multiple uses and multiple years, they will still be additive costs to the institutions creating MOOCs. Free, non-credit bearing MOOCs are likely to remain available only from the wealthiest institutions that can subsidize the costs from other sources of funds. For most institutions, ongoing participation in the current MOOC experimentation will be unaffordable unless they can offer credentials of economic value to attract fee-paying participants, or can use MOOCs to replace traditional offerings more efficiently, most likely by reducing expensive personnel.

4. Improving educational outcomes (38%)

for the most part, actual impact on educational outcomes has not been documented in any rigorous fashion. Consequently, in most cases, it is unclear whether the goal of improving educational outcomes has been achieved . However, there were two exceptions, providing evidence of improvement in student performance as a result of adopting MOOC strategies in on-campus courses

5. Innovation in teaching and learning (38%)

It is abundantly clear that MOOCs have prompted many institutions and faculty members to engage in new educational activities. The strategies employed online such as frequent assessments and short lectures interspersed with questions are being taken back on-campus. It is less clear what has been gained by these new initiatives because the value of innovation is hard to measure unless it can be tied to a further, more tangible objective. We …. conclude that most institutions are not yet making any rigorous attempt to assess whether MOOCs are more or less effective than other strategies to achieve these goals.

6. Research on teaching and learning (28%)

A great deal of effort is being expended on trying to improve participant engagement and completion of MOOCs and less effort on determining whether participants actually gain skills or knowledge from the courses ….While the potential for MOOCs to contribute significantly to the development of personalized and adaptive learning is high, the reality is far from being achieved.

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

Very interesting report on MOOCs

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Mentoring Instead of Teaching: A Paradigm Shift

Mentoring Instead of Teaching: A Paradigm Shift | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
By: Dawn Casey-Rowe Teachers give homework. Mentors change lives. If schools replaced teachers with mentors, classrooms would be revolutionized forever. This isn’t semantics – it’s a paradigm shift...

 

As we redesign schools, we have a unique opportunity to find practices that work and use them. Mentoring is one of those practices. I don’t want to be a teacher anymore. Teachers give tests and assign homework.

 

I want to be a mentor. I want to support students as they create the masterpieces that will be their lives.

 

I can only do this if we make school less about the test and more about the mission–treating students like the unique individuals they are with gifts that will change the world.

 


Via Gust MEES
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The Rice Process's curator insight, May 26, 3:26 PM

Excellent insights! The mentor/student relationship is a significant part of the learning process for all students at all stages of their education. A mentor is more than a teacher or advisor. A mentor accompanies the student on their personal journey, advising and giving feedback along the way. Many students--either consciously or unconsciously--crave additional guidance from educators, but may not know how to seek out that guidance.  Mentoring programs--in which students can talk to teachers or other educational mentors in a setting that is less formal than the classroom--provide a structured opportunity for students to do this. A well-planned and executed mentoring program could help define goals and means for students to stay on track, learn and grow. 

Ness Crouch's curator insight, May 30, 8:33 PM

I must agree completely with this article. There must be a clear shift within classrooms to allow students to access their learning in more efficient was. Sadly however most parents do not have an understanding of this idea and therefore may have opposition to their children learning from their own experiences with the teacher supporting them along the way.

AnnC's curator insight, June 3, 4:01 PM

Help support students as they create the masterpieces that will be their lives!

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The Real Neuroscience of Creativity | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

So yea, you know how the left brain is really realistic, analytical, practical, organized, and logical, and the right brain is so darn creative, passionate, sensual, tasteful, colorful, vivid, and poetic?

No.

Just no.

Stop it.

Please.

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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from the plastic brain
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Releasing the Brakes for Learning

Releasing the Brakes for Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Example of a dendrite of a principal neuron (white) and synaptic contacts (yellow arrowheads) from SOM1 interneurons. Credit Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research.

 

Researchers discover learning processes in the brain are dynamically regulated by various types of interneurons.

 

Learning can only occur if certain neuronal “brakes” are released. As the group led by Andreas Lüthi at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research has now discovered, learning processes in the brain are dynamically regulated by various types of interneurons. The new connections essential for learning can only be established if inhibitory inputs from interneurons are reduced at the right moment. These findings have now been published in Nature.


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The Fractal Brain Theory & the Unification of Neuroscience with AI & Psychology - YouTube

n this presentation, public speaker Wai H. Tsang reveals fully what several 2012 commentators have partially predicted, the coming of a world changing revelation to do with the Brain, Neuroscience, Psychology, Artificial Intelligence and Consciousness. The emergence of a unifying and definitive Fractal Theory of Brain and Mind. A huge and mysterious gap in human understanding will finally be filled. What some scientists, philosophers and technologists have supposed may be 50 to 100 years away in the future, is here today in London 2012.

He will explain that the brain is a fractal computing architecture and reveal an elegant way of understanding the brain's structure and operation, showing the same basic fundamental structure and process, being repeated at all scales and all places in the brain. Something that leading brain researchers and artificial intelligence experts have only so far been able to hint at, will be demonstrated clearly in this cutting edge talk. While discussing the latest and most up to date ideas in neuroscience today, Wai will show that behind the mind numbing myriad complexity of the brain lies a stunningly beautiful and elegant simplicity.

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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Scoop.it on the Web
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26 Free (or Free-to-Try) Content Curation Tools

26 Free (or Free-to-Try) Content Curation Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Content is still king, but it isn't always practical or cost effective for marketers to produce brand-new, meaty, thought-leadership level content pieces on a regular basis. That's where curating content can come in handy.

Content curation offers a nearly limitless method of fueling your inbound marketing efforts. Unearthing and sharing the quality content of others allows you provide your audience fresh content on a regular basis to serve any interest, industry, or market.

What's more, sharing and celebrating the work of others helps get you on their radar and can forge valuable, long-term relationships with the content authors.

To help you curate, here's a list of 26 tools you can use to find, aggregate and share your content with the world, be it in a blog roundup, big list of resources or to share via social. Note that some of these tools do all the work, and some are merely tools that lead up to the share.


Via Ally Greer
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Shelley Costello's curator insight, May 24, 9:40 AM

Content creation is the most difficult part of effective social media.

 

Shelley

htp://www.creativewebconceptsusa.com

 

 

Emmanuel 'Manny' Gigante's curator insight, May 24, 10:32 AM

i love my @Scoop.it

sourparrot's comment, June 11, 10:49 PM
Terrific
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Tools for Teachers & Learners
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Twijector

Twijector | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Twijector is a real-time twitter wall for conferences, events, cafe and classrooms.


Via Nik Peachey
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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, June 4, 3:07 PM

Interesting real time tool for integrating Twitter streams into conferences or classrooms. Just add a hashtag.

Emmanuel 'Manny' Gigante's curator insight, June 4, 8:49 PM

https://hootsuite.com/hootfeed

Jay Roth's curator insight, June 10, 12:19 PM

Similar to TodaysMeet - but public!

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning with MOOCs
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Megatrends in MOOCs: #7 Gamification

Megatrends in MOOCs: #7 Gamification | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"As digital learning environments, MOOCs are ideal for incorporating game elements. In fact, many MOOCs already have some kind of gamification, such as digital badges, which are becoming preferred alternative credentials in both the education and training spheres.

Gamification in MOOCs can take a variety of forms, from merely introducing a progress bar into courses (these now come standard in many learning management systems) to full-scale gamified training programs, with competitions, levels, content unlocking, rewards, and more…"


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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Amazing Science
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Seeing sound: visual cortex processes auditory information too

Seeing sound: visual cortex processes auditory information too | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Ten healthy subjects wearing blindfolds were given solely auditory stimulation in the absence of visual stimulation. In a separate session, retinotopic mapping.

 

University of Glasgow scientists studying brain process involved in sight have discovered that the visual cortex also uses information gleaned from the ears when viewing the world.

 

They suggest this auditory input enables the visual system to predict incoming information and could confer a survival advantage.

 

“Sounds create visual imagery, mental images, and automatic projections,” said Professor Lars Muckli, of the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, who led the research. “For example, if you are in a street and you hear the sound of an approaching motorbike, you expect to see a motorbike coming around the corner.”

 

The study, published in the journal Current Biology (open access), involved conducting five different experiments using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to examine the activity in the early visual cortex in 10 volunteer subjects.

 

In one experiment they asked the blindfolded volunteers to listen to three different sounds: birdsong, traffic noise and a talking crowd. Using a special algorithm that can identify unique patterns in brain activity, the researchers were able to discriminate between the different sounds being processed in early visual cortex activity.

A second experiment revealed that even imagined images, in the absence of both sight and sound, evoked activity in the early visual cortex.

 

“This research enhances our basic understanding of how interconnected different regions of the brain are,” Muckli said. “The early visual cortex hasn’t previously been known to process auditory information, and while there is some anatomical evidence of interconnectedness in monkeys, our study is the first to clearly show a relationship in humans.

 

“This might provide insights into mental health conditions such as schizophrenia or autism and help us understand how sensory perceptions differ in these individuals.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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An Instructional Media Selection Guide for Distance Learning


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Digital Curation Among Key Future Jobs: TheFutureShow with Gerd Leonhard

This is episode #3 of The Future Show (TFS) with Gerd Leonhard, season 1. Topics: In the future, most repetitive or machine-like tasks and jobs will be large...

Via Robin Good
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

Very interesting video, but regarding point 3. that "We are moving to right-brain work-jobs" I must note there are no "right-brain" jobs. This left-right brain distinction is oversimplified neuromyth.

 

“The latest findings from the real neuroscience of creativity suggest that the right brain/left brain distinction does not offer us the full picture of how creativity is implemented in the brain.* Creativity does not involve a single brain region or single side of the brain.” (http://t.co/3l5nM7IsEi)

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Robin Good's curator insight, May 26, 11:57 AM



Media and technology futurist Gerd Leonhard outlines his vision of the future of work given the many profound changes shaping the planet during the coming decades.


Key highlights: 


  1. We will be able to offload tedious, repetitive work to computers and robots who will replace rapidly many of our present jobs

  2. At the same time entirely new jobs will be created - for example:
    Digital Curation 
    Social Engineering
    Artificial Intelligence Designers 

  3. We are moving to right-brain work-jobs - that is: storytelling, emotions, creativity and imagination, negotiation 

  4. Education prepares us by having us learn things that we may need later. But in most cases we don't need those things but we rather need to know how to learn new things.

  5. More craftmanship-type of jobs like cooks, makers, hackers, coders, will fluorish as computers-machines cannot replicate such skills (yet)



Original video: http://youtu.be/X-PnJblNJng 


Full episode page: http://thefutureshow.tv/episode-3/ 




Stephen Dale's curator insight, May 28, 2:46 AM

The future of work. 

Bettina Ascaino's curator insight, June 9, 7:53 PM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Media and technology futurist Gerd Leonhardoutlines his vision of the future of work given the many profound changes shaping the planet during the coming decades.

 

Key highlights: 

 

We will be able to offload tedious, repetitive work to computers and robots who will replace rapidly many of our present jobs

At the same time entirely new jobs will be created - for example:
Digital Curation 
Social Engineering
Artificial Intelligence Designers 

We are moving to right-brain work-jobs - that is: storytelling, emotions, creativity and imagination, negotiation 

Education prepares us by having us learn things that we may need later. But in most cases we don't need those things but we rather need to know how to learn new things.

More craftmanship-type of jobs like cooks, makers, hackers, coders, will fluorish as computers-machines cannot replicate such skills (yet)

 

 

Original video: http://youtu.be/X-PnJblNJng ;

 

Full episode page: http://thefutureshow.tv/episode-3/ ;

 
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The Student-Centered Classroom - Liberate Learners To Flip Their Own Lessons

The Student-Centered Classroom - Liberate Learners To Flip Their Own Lessons | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"The expanded availability of easy tech tools has empowered educators to rethink homework and daily instruction. Flipping the classroom with teacher-made videos allows students to self-direct their at-home learning. Many of these clips, however, still involve a one-day delivery of information, from teacher to student. Another approach is to allow children to make their own educational videos. They can enlighten their classmates with their creations, and they can teach themselves the material and the skills during the process of production."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 26, 5:47 PM

Have you considered having students use the Adobe Voice app (iPad) to create materials that others may use to review work? This post shares how one school has done this with 8th grade students and provides 3 videos embedded in the post as well as a link to a page where you can see more student work.

The post also discussed "four key proficiencies" that students may demonstrate as they create an Adobe Voice video:

* Symbolic and visual metaphor - in choosing images and/or icons  and their definitions of words students are demonstrating understanding of figurative meaning.

* Narrative - students narrate their story and provide images that seamlessly move from one point to another within the story.

* Text- students select key text, highlighting vocabulary.

* Design - students learn critical elements necessary to convey content. Elements may include, music, images, voice, color, transitions, layout and more.

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Connectivism: Informing Distance Education Theory, Pedagogy and Research

George Siemens’ (2005) article “Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age” has sparked both innovation and controversy (Anderson, 2009; Kop & Hill, 2008; Bell, 2001). In stark contrast to Clark’s (1983) analogy that the truck delivering our groceries does not impact our nutrition, “only the content of the vehicle can influence achievement” (Clark, 1983, p. 445), Siemens suggests in the current knowledge economy “the pipe is more important than the content in the pipe” (Siemens, 2005, p.6). As the article unfolds, however, a more apt rendering may be that connectivism repositions media as a type of content, in that media, as tools of cognitive engagement, have the potential to transform the content of learning (Cobb, 1997).

 

 

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10 Blended Learning Trends - Edudemic

10 Blended Learning Trends - Edudemic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Blended learning can tick a lot of boxes for a lot of different teachers who teach in potentially quite different scenarios. From 1:1 classrooms and schools with plenty of iPads to BYOD classes filled with different types (and amounts) of technology, blended learning can help nearly every teacher make learning more personalized and more interesting for their students.  Implementing a blended learning program in your classroom can be a great way to put the technology tools you have – whatever they may be – to use. The handy infographic below takes a look at 10 blended learning trends that are showing up in today’s classrooms. Keep reading to learn more!

 

 

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Sparking the Networks…Staying Alive!!! Connectivism for Teachers | Online Learning

Sparking the Networks…Staying Alive!!! Connectivism for Teachers | Online Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Flipping Classrooms, Project Based Learning and Connectivism…we are moving towards a personalized approach to learning where students and teachers can together decide what innovative and creative form of learning best fits and suits the class. Technology in this scenario plays a large role as the tool which enables learning in any form or place. It helps differentiate easily, reach and access and provides parity of educational instruction to students across the world.

 

That is the power of technology transformation.

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An Online Objectives Builder

An Online Objectives Builder | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Use this application to develop instructional objectives for your courses and instructional programs.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Connectivism
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Improvisation Blog: Stephen Downes defends Connectivism (again)

It's not uncommon that after failed experiments there is a bit of wailing and gnashing of teeth as the rationale which underpinned them is critiqued. This seems to be going on with the MOOC at the moment. Stephen Downes has become famous through innovating with learning technologies. He has defended his innovations with a theory of learning (one feels that it is his theory he is most proud of, not the interventions). He has done a lot of defending of his theory over the last few months, spurred on by some interesting critiques by Marc Clarà and Elena Barberà (see Three problems with the connectivist conception of learning) and Matthias Melcher.

No doubt driven by the apparent failure of MOOCs (which would indicate something is wrong with Downes's theory) critique is good because it can be the impetus for very clear statements about that theory. To his credit, Downes has done this in response to the criticisms made. (see http://halfanhour.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/on-three-or-four-problems-of.html)


Via Susan Bainbridge
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Online and blended communities of inquiry: Exploring the developmental and perceptional differences

Online and blended communities of inquiry: Exploring the developmental and perceptional differences | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

This paper discusses findings of a mixed method approach to a study of the development of a community of inquiry in an online and a blended learning environment. A graduate course delivered online and in a blended format was the context of the study. Data were gathered from the Community of Inquiry Survey, transcript analysis of online discussions, and interviews with students and the course instructor. Using multiple qualitative and quantitative data sources, the goal was to explore the developmental differences of the three presences (social, teaching, and cognitive) in the community of inquiry framework and students’ perceptions of a community of inquiry. The results indicated that in both the online and blended course a community of inquiry developed and students could sense each presence. However, the findings revealed developmental differences in social and cognitive presence between the two course formats with higher perceptions in the blended course.

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A Quick, No-Nonsense Guide to Basic Instructional Design Theory

A Quick, No-Nonsense Guide to Basic Instructional Design Theory | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Three Most Popular Learning Theories of Instructional Design

Of the many eLearning theories that influence the practice, three of them are used by professionals on a daily basis. And all of them are concerned with HOW students are going to learn. By understanding each of them, you are able to figure out which works well in a learning environment. You can, of course, combine these theories depending on your (1) goal as an instructional designer, (2) the business objectives of your organization or client organization, (3) the needs of learners, and (4) the subject matter.

 

 

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