Learning & Mind &...
Follow
Find
14.1K views | +7 today
Learning & Mind & Brain
About Online Learning
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

Learning (Re)Imagined | Graham Brown-Martin | TEDxAmsterdamED (Video)

Learning (Re)Imagined: How the connected society is transforming learning.
Graham is a huge believer in the fact that education will only change by getting more people involved.In this engaging and witty talk packed with images and quotes, Graham discusses his research in Learning (Re)imagined and some of his key conclusions around transformation and learning that include context, environment, engagement, technology and the future.

Graham Brown-Martin is the founder of Learning Without Frontiers (LWF), a global think tank that brought together renowned educators, technologists and creatives to share provocative and challenging ideas about the future of learning. He left LWF in 2013 to pursue new programs and ideas to transform the way we learn, teach and live. Graham spent 2 years researching, travelling, writing and editing video to create the transmedia work, Learning {Re}imagined published by Bloomsbury Academic, 2014.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Open Badges in Professional Development: A Framework

Open Badges in Professional Development: A Framework | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
An Open Badge is a digital representation of a skill or achievement earned from a creditable organization. This session presents a framework for how school districts can leverage open badges to encourage and reward professional growth through non-traditional means. Earned badges can be displayed in professional portfolios, Linkedin profiles, and various social networks like Facebook

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Philippe-Didier Gauthier's curator insight, April 30, 1:49 AM

#ePortfolio Dès lors, dans notre université, les stagiaires et les étudiants doivent maintenant identifier, décrire et "badger" leurs compétences issues des expériences dans l'alternance, en complément de leur ePortfolio habituel, lui-même intégrer dans la reconnaissance des apprentissages informels et non formels. Cela encourage l'habitude de reconnaître les compétences issues de l'expérience, au même niveau que les compétences issues des apprentissages formels. Et les relations avec les entreprises prennent un sens nouveau.

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning and Teaching in an Online Environment
Scoop.it!

Does it really take longer to create an online course?

Does it really take longer to create an online course? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Researcher looks to empirical evidence to determine why teaching online courses seems to take more time than face-to-face courses.

 

Does the development, and teaching, of online courses really take longer than for face-to-face courses? One researcher recently set out to discover if these existing beliefs can be supported empirically, rather than anecdotally.

 

And though Lee A. Freeman, associate professor of MIS and Information Technology at the College of Business at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, did find these beliefs to have empirical support, the reasons why developing and teaching online courses take longer may be different than those propagated by “trade press and qualitative perceptions.”

For example, one key finding of Freeman’s study, “Instructor Time Requirements to Develop and Teach Online Courses” found that the widespread belief that a technology learning curve leads to increased time spent for developing online courses is incorrect. Often, it’s the pedagogical learning curve that hinders progress for professors teaching online courses.

 

Another finding indicates that after initial online course creation and delivery, professors see a notable decline in time needed for teaching, with time spent per course equaling that of a face-to-face course.

“Instructors, department chairs, deans, and program administrators have long believed that teaching online is more time-consuming than teaching face-to-face,” explained Freeman. “Many research studies and practitioner articles indicate instructor time commitment as a major inhibitor to developing and teaching online courses. However, while they identify the issue and provide possible solutions, they do not empirically measure actual time commitments or instructor perceptions when comparing online to face-to-face delivery and when comparing multiple iterations of delivery.”


Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Sam Burrough, Martin Couzins: MOOCs, are they just misunderstood?

What if we took the best bits of learning technology and used them to design rich, social learning experiences that produced enormous amounts of useful data? Sounds quite appealing to most L&D folk, but watch the shutters come slamming down when you tell them it’s a MOOC. Over the past year Martin and Sam have been exploring how we can use MOOC-like approaches to create better learning experiences. They’ve run two MOOCs with over 800 L&D people around the world and learned as much about our profession’s attitude to innovation, as they have about designing and delivering MOOCs.

In this session they would like to help you:

• Reset your understanding around MOOCs
• Dispel some MOOC myths
• Identify existing tools you could combine to build a MOOC-like experience
• Discover a whole new world of data
• Understand where MOOCs fit in your learning and talent strategy

 

 

more...
Christa Meenan's curator insight, April 23, 2:28 PM

Focus of this conference:

• Reset your understanding around MOOCs

• Dispel some MOOC myths

• Identify existing tools you could combine to build a MOOC-like experience

• Discover a whole new world of data

• Understand where MOOCs fit in your learning and talent strategy

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from the plastic brain
Scoop.it!

How Much Sleep is Just Right for Cognitive Function?

How Much Sleep is Just Right for Cognitive Function? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We all know about the importance of sleep. But what's the difference between four, six and eight hours of sleep?

Via iPamba
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
Scoop.it!

The strange afterlife of Einstein's brain

The strange afterlife of Einstein's brain | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"Perhaps the most striking is that Einstein had an extra ridge on his mid-frontal lobe, the part used for making plans and working memory. Most people have three ridges but Einstein had four. She also found Einstein's parietal lobes were dramatically asymmetric, and he had a knob on his right motor strip. This latter feature is called the "sign of omega" and it is thought to be correlated to musicians who use their left hands. Einstein played the violin."


Via Maggie Rouman
more...
Maggie Rouman's curator insight, April 20, 2:14 PM

Fascinating story about what happened to Einstein's brain...

Maggie Rouman's curator insight, April 20, 2:15 PM

Fascinating story about what happened to Einstein's brain...

Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Donald Clark Plan B: Does gamification play Pavlov with learners? DOs & DON'Ts

Donald Clark Plan B: Does gamification play Pavlov with learners? DOs & DON'Ts | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The massive success of online games led many to suggest that games and gamification, could be used to turbo-charge online learning. Take a little magic dust from gaming, sprinkle generously and we’ll all find it more fun, be more motivated and learn to love learning. But there’s pros and cons here, as it can both help and hinder learning. If gamification is simply scoring, bonuses and badges, the 21st century version of Pavlov's dogs, that would be a disappointment. The simple stimuli, scores and rewards may keep learners going forward but it can be a distractive, disappointing and shallow form of engagement, skating across the surface of content. It may also demand more cognitive effort for not much gain. The danger is in takinglearning abck to the behaviourist era, with simple Pavlovian conditioned responses, or S-O-R theory. The learning game still has far too much behaviourist theory. Most obviously through learning objectives.


On the other hand, many proven, evidence-based pieces of learning theory seem to be congruent with games techniques, such as chunking, constructive failure, practice, doing and performance. I've given a detailed analsis of a real example here - Angry Birds.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

70:20:10 Guide: Provide Structure to the 70%

70:20:10 Guide: Provide Structure to the 70% | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One of the biggest challenges of using the 70:20:10 framework is how to do it. Read Cindy Pascale, CEO of Vado, discussing the nature of this training model and how to improve your informal training program.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

The Open Web | An Open Education Week Thing by Brian Lamb and Alan Levine

The Open Web | An Open Education Week Thing by Brian Lamb and Alan Levine | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

2015 Mobile Learning Trends Infographic

2015 Mobile Learning Trends Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The 2015 Mobile Learning Trends Infographic explores what role mobiles are playing in shaping up the workplace learning scenario. These trends with mobile learning are evidence to the fact that we are on the brink of a new era of learning – through the mobile device
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Moodle and Web 2.0
Scoop.it!

Why Aren’t More Schools Using Free, Open Tools?

Why Aren’t More Schools Using Free, Open Tools? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One school in Pennsylvania is using open-source tools wherever possible to keep students close to the code behind the machines they use. This stance is opposite to the very restrictive policies of many schools, but could allow students more freedom to explore what makes devices work.

Via Juergen Wagner
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Content Curation World
Scoop.it!

Curate To Educate: From Online Courses to Full Learning Programs

Curate To Educate: From Online Courses to Full Learning Programs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

If you have a strong passion or expertise it's time to start thinking about building your own online school. 

 

Check out these two tools:

- Learnyst

- Classmill

 

Other curation tools for learning moving in the same direction:

- Gibbon

- Learnist

- Educrate

 

More content curation tools organised in categories:

https://contentcuration.zeef.com/robin.good


Via Robin Good
more...
Stephen Dale's curator insight, April 7, 6:12 AM

A couple of great finds from master Curator Robin Good. As he notes

 

"This is an interesting trend as in the past most tools to deliver educational content relied on the author creating and posting only his own materials. The fact that you can now include valuable content published by others opens up the gates both for the curation of lots of existing content into useful learning courses as well as for the issues of whether and how to compensate curated content from others"

 

Reading time: 5mins

Filomena Gomes's curator insight, April 18, 9:57 AM
Robin Good's insight:

 

New interesting tools make it possible to create online courses and full online learning programs, by drastically simplifying the design process while providing simple tools to curate and bring together valuable existing content already published online.

 

The first I'd like to bring to your attention is Classmill, which makes it very easy to create online courses by providing a very simple and intuitive interface and allowing the author to add with ease his own texts, as well as images, links and video clips coming from elsewhere on the web. Anyone can publish an online course and make it visible to everyone. Only those who register and join in can see the full contents and can participate in the integrated discussion area for the course.

 

The second one is Learnyst, which goes one step beyond Classmill by facilitating the creation of a full online school with multiple courses and the ability to charge for selected ones. 

 

Both tools are extremely easy to use, and allow the assembly of existing materials, whether owned or produced by others. 

 

This is an interesting trend as in the past most tools to deliver educational content relied on the author creating and posting only his own materials. The fact that you now can easily include valuable content published by others opens up the gates both for the curation of lots of existing content into useful learning courses as well as for the issue of whether and how to compensate curated content from others. 

 

This economic issue though, does not preclude tons of free high-quality content to be re-used and showcased in many new free learning courses and it provides those who want to learn with even more non-commercial alternatives to master their favorite topics. 

 

Takeaway: You are going to see more of these tools and more subject-matter experts create valuable learning resources by bringing together key relevant content produced by others while adding tangible value, perspective and context.

If you have a strong passion or expertise it's time to start thinking about building your own online school. 

 

 

Check out these two tools:

- Learnyst

- Classmill

 

Other curation tools for learning moving in the same direction:

- Gibbon

- Learnist

- Educrate

 

More content curation tools organised in categories:

https://contentcuration.zeef.com/robin.good ;

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, April 19, 2:25 PM

 

332
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from 21st Century Concepts-Technology in the Classroom
Scoop.it!

Five Essential Tech Tools to Keep Teachers Learning

Five Essential Tech Tools to Keep Teachers Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

“Tech-using teachers must not only harvest the ideas of others but curate what's valuable & create opportunities to learn. Curtis Chandler shares 5 digital tools”


Via Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D., juandoming, Tom Perran
more...
Tom Perran's curator insight, April 17, 8:46 PM
Suggestions for using tech tools more effectively to further your own learning.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

TEACHING IN AN ONLINE LEARNING CONTEXT by Terry Anderson

TEACHING IN AN ONLINE LEARNING CONTEXT by Terry Anderson | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 21, 5:59 AM

"This chapter focuses on the role of the teacher or tutor in an online learning context. It uses the theoretical model developed by Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000) that views the creation of an effective online educational community as involving three critical components: cognitive presence, social presence, and teaching presence. This model was developed and verified through content analysis and by other qualitative and quantitative measures in recent research work at the University of Alberta (for papers resulting from this work see Anderson, Garrison, Archer & Rourke, N.d.) (http://www.atl.ualberta.ca/cmc)."

Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Here We Are: Looking Ahead: Strategic Issues for the Second Generation of Online Learning

Here We Are: Looking Ahead: Strategic Issues for the Second Generation of Online Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In short, we’ve been doing this for a while now. Over the past two decades, online learning has become a global phenomenon that has had an impact on just about every kind of higher education institution—not to mention K-12 education and job training. It has stimulated new kinds of institutions, new collaborations among institutions, new partnerships between colleges and employers, and new ways of thinking about the processes of teaching and learning, on campus and off. In the process, it has become clear that online learning is not simply a new educational technology. Instead, we need to see it as a way that higher education can adapt to the new demands on our communities that have arisen as the Information Revolution has matured into a Global Information Society.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning with MOOCs
Scoop.it!

Coursera’s Data Deluge

Coursera’s Data Deluge | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Leiden University runs some of the world’s most successful Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Over the past two years, Leiden University has produced 11 iterations of 6 unique MOOCs.

 

The Leiden University MOOC data provided to us by Coursera offers us exciting avenues to better understand the behavior of our online learners. Additionally, we are gearing up to implement possibilities for experimentation with course content. Such experiments focus on the flexible adaptations of, for example, video length and question formats over time to register critical differences, and further include experimentation in fusing online and on-campus education with the aim of creating more flexible course structures that focus on the specific learning style of the students. These tools open up exciting new possibilities to gain insights in the learning behavior of thousands of learners, and will no doubt serve to better the educational experiences of our on-campus students.


Via SusanBat
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

5 Things Instead of Video to Make your MOOC Extra Awesome - MOOC Report

5 Things Instead of Video to Make your MOOC Extra Awesome - MOOC Report | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Designing MOOCs don't require fancy videos to be engaging. OpenLearning's Brooke Hahn gives five ways to improve student learning experiences.

 

The best way for students to learn is by being active: when students are thinking critically and deeply, when they are relating new information to their existing world, and when they are actively sharing and contributing to their learning community.


Active learning facilitates deep and effective learning because it requires the use of higher order thinking skills, creativity, and problem-solving. It places the student at the centre of the learning and empowers them in their learning discovery process.


Passively watching a video doesn’t achieve the same level of rich learning, because it does not require the student to do anything but sit, watch, and hopefully absorb information.

 

The great news is, designing active learning experiences for your MOOC is fun and won’t cost you a thing!


 1. Connect the learning to the students’ world

2. Get students to create something of their own

3. Have students to share things that are around them4. Ask students to challenge each other!5. Encourage students to reflect on their learning


 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
Scoop.it!

This Is Your Brain on Podcasts: Why Audio Storytelling Is So Addictive

This Is Your Brain on Podcasts: Why Audio Storytelling Is So Addictive | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The emotional appeal of listening

Via Maggie Rouman
more...
Maggie Rouman's curator insight, April 20, 2:27 PM

The researchers reason that experiencing tension in a story makes people feel stressed, which makes their bodies release the hormone and neurotransmitter oxytocin. Since oxytocin has been shown to increase empathy in some experiments, when things get tense while listening to a story, reading a book, or watching a TV show or movie, you may begin to empathize with the characters and get “transported” into the story.

Maggie Rouman's curator insight, April 20, 2:29 PM

"The researchers reason that experiencing tension in a story makes people feel stressed, which makes their bodies release the hormone and neurotransmitter oxytocin. Since oxytocin has been shown to increase empathy in some experiments, when things get tense while listening to a story, reading a book, or watching a TV show or movie, you may begin to empathize with the characters and get “transported” into the story."


Empathy... a key trait of emotional intelligence.

Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Study finds student success lags online in California community college students | InsideHigherEd

Study finds student success lags online in California community college students | InsideHigherEd | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Large study of California community college students finds that they are more likely to succeed in in-person courses.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Is your E-learning GUI Learner – friendly? 10 Examples to Help You Out!

Is your E-learning GUI Learner – friendly? 10 Examples to Help You Out! | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One of the adult learning principles states that adult learners don’t like to be directed, but wish to explore and acquire knowledge themselves. In an eLearning course, the main purpose of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) is to enable learners to navigate seamlessly and tell them ‘where they are’ in the course, how many slides they have completed, how many more do they need to complete and so on. The GUI of a typical online training course contains buttons such as Play, Pause, Replay, Previous, and Next. It also has the progress bar and a menu which contains options to turn the audio on/off, seek help online, access the glossary and resources and exit the eLearning course. Depending upon our requirements, we can skip or add some of the elements described above.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

EdTech Developer's Guide - 10 Opportunities

EdTech Developer's Guide - 10 Opportunities | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The Office of Eduational Technology just published a developer's guide on behalf of US Department of Education, it's called "A primer for software developers, startups, and entrepreneurs". .


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Pedagogy, Critical Pedagogy, Hybrid Pedagogy, #digped
Scoop.it!

A Letter to the Humanities: DH Will Not Save You - Hybrid Pedagogy

A Letter to the Humanities: DH Will Not Save You - Hybrid Pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In other words, Humanities Computing has focused on using computational tools to further humanities research, and not to study the effects of computation as a humanities question.

Via Hybrid Pedagogy
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

eLearning Interactivity: The Ultimate Guide For eLearning Professionals - eLearning Industry

eLearning Interactivity: The Ultimate Guide For eLearning Professionals - eLearning Industry | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What Is eLearning Interactivity?

eLearning interactivity is defined as the “dialogue” between learners and eLearning tools through which learners become engaged and involved in the eLearning process. It is a key element of the actual eLearning course design process, and it has proven to be a practice that adds outstanding value to your eLearning course. It involves forms of action or reaction on learners’ behalf, in order for them to achieve results or reach a conclusion. eLearning interactions may include multiple choice quizzes, tests, eLearning scenarios, simulations, animation videos etc, that help learners to deepen their understanding of the subject matter through experimentation, dealing with unpredicted circumstances, or even learning from their mistakes.
The eLearning Interactivity Levels

The eLearning interactivity levels are defined based on the extent of interactivity in the eLearning process. With this in mind, there are four main eLearning interactivity levels:

Passive eLearning interactivity level: No interaction
Learners are not required to interact with eLearning resources and the eLearning process is strictly linear. This level may include: simple images and graphics, simple video and audio, test questions, ect.
Limited eLearning interactivity level: Limited participation
Learners may have some control over their eLearning experience, as they are required to make simple interactions with the eLearning material. This level may include: animations, clickable menus, drag and drop interactions, and multimedia.
Moderate eLearning interactivity level: Moderate interaction
Learners gain more control over the eLearning experience, which is more customized and complex. This level may include: animated video, customized audio, complex drag and drop interactions, simulations, stories and branching scenarios and multimedia.
Full eLearning interactivity level: Full immersion
Learners have great control over their eLearning experience, as they are required to fully interact with the eLearning content and give feedback. This level may include: interactive games, simulated job performance exercises, customized audio or videos, avatars, stories and scenarios, as well as multimedia.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

6 Ways to Make Learning Visible

6 Ways to Make Learning Visible | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
How do we distinguish knowledge, skills, and thinking from….learning? How do we make learning visible, so that we might surface and document powerful discoveries about the influence of our teaching on learners? These questions will guide several of my conversations with teachers on the ground this week, as we begin exploring John Hattie’s work and the Reggio Emilia approach.

Both concern themselves with the moves that students and teachers make as learning occurs, and both inspire teachers to commit to documentation, as the evidence captured helps teachers and students assess the impact of their efforts far better than grades do.
more...
Venkatesh Iyer (venkyiyer.com)'s curator insight, April 19, 12:12 PM

Don't knowledge, skills and thinking derive from learning?

Terry Doherty's curator insight, April 19, 12:16 PM

Love the simplicity of idea #1 - display a child's work collected over time. Then go back and reflect on it together!

Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

New Information Absorbed Best After A Good Night’s Sleep

New Information Absorbed Best After A Good Night’s Sleep | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Academics from the Department of Psychology at Royal Holloway taught a group of people new words from a fictional language, which unknown to them, was characterised by a rule relating the new words to one another. They found that although learners became aware of the rule within the new language shortly after being taught it, they were unable to apply it to understanding new, untrained words until after a period of rest.

Kathy Rastle, Professor of Cognitive Psychology at Royal Holloway, said: “Teachers have long suspected that proper rest is critical for successful learning. Our research provides some experimental support for this notion. Participants in our experiments were able to identify the hidden rule shortly after learning. However, it was not until they were tested a week after training that participants were able to use that rule to understand a totally new word from the fictional language when it was presented in a sentence.”

She added: “This result shows that the key processes that underpin long-term learning of general knowledge arise outside of the classroom, sometime after learning, and may be associated with brain processes that arise during sleep.”

The research, published in the journal Cognitive Psychology also found that participants needed time to consolidate this rule-based knowledge before being introduced to new words that did not follow the rule. If the exceptions were introduced during the initial vocabulary learning session, learners were unable to develop an understanding of the general rule.
more...
No comment yet.