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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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Do People Like To Think?

Do People Like To Think? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Commentator Alva Noë considers a widely discussed study — and debate that has ensued — showing that we'd rather get shocked with electricity than spend time alone with our own thoughts.


Via Andrew Clarke, Jocelyn Stoller
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Quality assurance of eLearning
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QAA reviews ‘could be abolished’

QAA reviews ‘could be abolished’ | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Institutional reviews by the Quality Assurance Agency could become a thing of the past in favour of more robust internal monitoring by universities themselves, a draft policy paper suggests.

Via Harvey Mellar
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What To Look For When Choosing an LMS Infographic

What To Look For When Choosing an LMS Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Choosing a Learning Management System is a complicated process and can be very time consuming and overwhelming for organizations since there are many different aspects to consider, not to mention that the LMS is usually the most expensive component of the online learning ecosystem. The What To Look For When Choosing an LMS Infographic has been developed to show organizations the main features and most important functionalities that they should look for during their search for the perfect LMS.
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Edtech and assessment
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Assessment Commons - Internet Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment

Assessment Commons - Internet Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Great higher ed assessment resources! http://t.co/kfCy5eHEl4

Via Julie Tardy
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Effective Education
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The Science Of Why We Talk Too Much (And How To Shut Up)

The Science Of Why We Talk Too Much (And How To Shut Up) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Our brains are wired to reward us for talking about ourselves. But droning on about yourself is a horrible way to make a good impression.


Via Cindy Riley Klages, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning with MOOCs
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MOOCs: What's Next?

MOOCs and Learning Sciences: Where we have been. Where we are going. by George Siemens

Scandinavian MOOC Conference Stockholm, Sweden June 12, 2015


Via Peter Mellow
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning - Social Media - Innovation
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How Curated Content Performance Beats Original Content - Heidi Cohen

How Curated Content Performance Beats Original Content - Heidi Cohen | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Having the original versus curated content debate? Here's research to help you. Advantages and disadvantages of original vs curated content are presented.

Via Marc Wachtfogel, PhD
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 12, 4:00 PM
Having the original versus curated content debate? Here's research to help you. Advantages and disadvantages of original vs curated content are presented.


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/learn-every-day-a-bit-with-curation/


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Curation


bernieshoot's curator insight, June 13, 7:28 AM

#content #performance

Tony Guzman's curator insight, June 15, 2:40 PM

This article addresses the argument of, "What is more effective: original or curated content?"

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Could this overlooked component be the key to MOOC engagement?

Could this overlooked component be the key to MOOC engagement? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Analyzing over 4,000 student comments and reviews of the 7 most active and highly-rated MOOCs, researchers say formative and peer assessment strategies in relation to MOOCs directly affect student engagement.

According to researchers at the Open University of Catalonia (OUC), Spain, research on student engagement in MOOCs exists for non-didactic factors (profiles, demographics, institutional reputation) and didactic factors (course structure and content, workload and duration, type of exams and assessments), but little research has been conducted to determine whether different types of assessment (formative, non-formative, peer and self-assessment) or different student feedback approaches actually affect student engagement.

With the aim of providing specific research-based recommendations on formative assessment and feedback practices that can advance student activity, “we analyzed some significant research papers on formative assessments and feedback methods applicable to face-to-face teaching environments that advance student engagement, and concluded with related requirements and conditions that can be applied also to MOOCs,” explained Nikolaos Floratos, PhD researcher at OUC and lead author of the report.

Researchers also analyzed 4050 comments and reviews of the 7 most active and highly-rated MOOCs (6 from Coursera and 1 from edX) provided by students who are in the final stages of completing those courses via an online review platform for MOOCs, called CourseTalk.

Based on this content analysis, Floratos and his team formulated 14 recommendations that support what the researchers say is a new conceptual and theoretical framework analysis on formative assessment in

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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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What it feels like to be the last generation to remember life before the internet

What it feels like to be the last generation to remember life before the internet | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Technology has a lot to answer for: killing old businesses, destroying the middle class, Buzzfeed. Technology in the form of the internet is especially villainous, having been accused of everything from making us dumber (paywall) to aiding dictatorships. But Michael Harris, riffing on the observations of Melvin Kranzberg, argues that “technology is neither good nor evil. The most we can say about it is this: It has come.”

Harris is the author of “The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connection,” a new book about how technology affects society. It follows in the footsteps of Nicholas Carr, whose “The Shallows” is a modern classic of internet criticism. But Harris takes a different path from those that have come before. Instead of a broad investigation into the effects of constant connectivity on human behaviour, Harris looks at a very specific demographic: people born before 1985, or the very opposite of the “millennial” demographic coveted by advertisers and targeted by new media outlets.

These people, says Harris, are the last of a dying breed. “If you were born before 1985, then you know what life is like both with the internet and without. You are making the pilgrimage from Before to After,” he writes. It is a nice conceit. Harris, like your correspondent, grew up in a very different world, one with limited channels of communication, fewer forms of entertainment, and less public scrutiny of quotidian actions or fleeting thoughts. It was neither better nor worse than the world we live in today. Like technology, it just was.

Being in this situation puts us in a privileged position.”If we’re the last people in history to know life before the internet, we are also the only ones who will ever speak, as it were, both languages. We are the only fluent translators of Before and After.”

That means being able to notice things like the reduction of interactions to numbers, and how that translates into quantifications of human worth. “I think it has to do with this notion of online accountability. That is, noticing that you actually count seems to be related to a sense of self worth,” he says over the phone from Toronto, where he is based. “So it’s like if a tweet gets retweeted a couple of hundred times, that must mean that my thoughts are worthy. If my Facebook photo is ‘liked,’ that must mean I am good looking. One of the things that concerns me about a media diet that is overly online, is that we lose the ability to decide for ourselves what we think about who we

 

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Karen Bowden's curator insight, June 30, 2:32 PM

If you were born before 1985 you know what it was like both before and after the internet.  Shall time eventually be referred to as Before Internet and After Internet?

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Examples of WebQuests for Science - Edutopia

Examples of WebQuests for Science - Edutopia | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented activity in which students get all information from the web. Teachers provide their students with the documents that include links to websites to use the information, according to the activity. The purpose of using WebQuest is to encourage students to use information rather than gathering it and participate in meaningful classroom discussions. WebQuest supports critical thinking through analyzing, creating, and evaluating. Also, it integrates technology into learning and foster cooperative learning.

Below are examples of WebQuests in a science classroom:

Via John Evans
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Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
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Free Range Teaching

Free Range Teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
I was listening to NPR last month when they did a story on free range parenting. The story covered the debate about the pros and cons of this approach, which values self-reliance and independence. The free range movement is a response to “helicopter” parents who are overly involved in their children’s lives, thus stifling their ability to cultivate the qualities valued by free range parents.

As I listened to this debate, I immediately thought of it in the context of the classroom. There is an interesting shift happening in education right now that touches on a similar tension between control and compliance versus freedom and self-reliance. Many traditional teachers are reluctant to transition from a teacher-centered classroom to a student-centered classroom. They fear that the classroom will plunge into chaos if students are given the autonomy to make decisions and drive learning.

In a teacher-centered classroom, the focus is on the teacher. The teacher is in control of the classroom environment and the activities taking place there. By contrast, the student-centered approach places the focus on the students. Students are at the center of the learning happening in the classroom, which requires that they make decisions and work together. One values control and compliance while the other values freedom and self-reliance.

As I approached our final unit of the year, I decided to embrace a free range approach to teaching. I wanted to see what would happen if students were given complete autonomy and freedom to design and execute a 5-week unit.
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 12, 1:10 PM

Makes sense.  Since its the students who need to learn, they are the best ones to decide best how to learn.  When I was first in the classroom in the 60s, I learned that when you clearly give students responsibility, and clear goals, and step back into a supportive/facilitate role, they are best at figuring out how best to learn the material and will be very responsible and even correct those who want to "goof off."  -Lon

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Amazing Science
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Machine-Learning Supercomputer Woven from Idle Computers to Rival Google in Power

Machine-Learning Supercomputer Woven from Idle Computers to Rival Google in Power | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Sentient claims to have assembled machine-learning muscle to rival Google by rounding up idle computers.

 

Recent improvements in speech and image recognition have come as companies such as Google build bigger, more powerful systems of computers to run machine-learning software. Now a relative minnow, a private company called Sentient with only about 70 employees, says it can cheaply assemble even larger computing systems to power artificial-intelligence software. The company’s approach may not be suited to all types of machine learning, a technology that has uses as varied as facial recognition and financial trading. Sentient has not published details, but says it has shown that it can put together enough computing power to produce significant results in some cases.


Sentient’s power comes from linking up hundreds of thousands of computers over the Internet to work together as if they were a single machine. The company won’t say exactly where all the machines it taps into are. But many are idle inside data centers, the warehouse-like facilities that power Internet services such as websites and mobile apps, says Babak Hodjat, cofounder and chief scientist at Sentient. The company pays a data-center operator to make use of its spare machines.


Data centers often have significant numbers of idle machines because they are built to handle surges in demand, such as a rush of sales on Black Friday. Sentient has created software that connects machines in different places over the Internet and puts them to work running machine-learning software as if they were one very powerful computer. That software is designed to keep data encrypted as much as possible so that what Sentient is working on–perhaps for a client–is kept confidential.


Sentient can get up to one million processor cores working together on the same problem for months at a time, says Adam Beberg, principal architect for distributed computing at the company. Google’s biggest machine-learning systems don’t reach that scale, he says. A Google spokesman declined to share details of the company’s infrastructure and noted that results obtained using machine learning are more important than the scale of the computer system behind it. Google uses machine learning widely, in areas such as search, speech recognition and ad targeting.


Beberg helped pioneer the idea of linking up computers in different places to work together on a problem (see “Innovators Under 35: 1999”). He was a founder of Distributed.net, a project that was one of the first to demonstrate that idea at large scale. Its technology led to efforts such as Seti@Home andFolding@Home, in which millions of people installed software so their PCs could help search for alien life or contribute to molecular biology research.


Sentient was founded in 2007 and has received over $140 million in investment funding, with just over $100 million of that received late last year. The company has so far focused on using its technology to power a machine-learning technique known as evolutionary algorithms. That involves “breeding” a solution to a problem from an initial population of many slightly different algorithms. The best performers of the first generation are used to form the basis of the next, and over successive generations the solutions get better and better.


Sentient currently earns some revenue from operating financial-trading algorithms created by running its evolutionary process for months at a time on hundreds of thousands of processors. But the company now plans to use its infrastructure to offer services targeted at industries such as health care or online commerce, says Hodjat.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, June 12, 10:02 PM

Supercomputing can manifest in many ways - high-speed, high-volume computing will still probably require a dedicated supercomputer with high PFLOPS count as its appeal. 

Many solutions simply require ongoing processing of data and distributed models like this one have been leveraged by systems like SETI for many years.

Variety is still a requirement...

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning and Teaching in an Online Environment
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10 Ways to Change a Higher Ed IT Culture -- Campus Technology

10 Ways to Change a Higher Ed IT Culture -- Campus Technology | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The information technology services department at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse transformed its culture via a simple, step-by-step process.

Via Peter Mellow
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Didactics and Technology in Education
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Our poor sleeping habits are filling our brains with neurotoxins

Our poor sleeping habits are filling our brains with neurotoxins | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"One more reason to put away the phone and just get a good night's sleep, already." .............. "As a result of these findings, Swart said she’s been “even more careful about [her] sleep.” In fact, as part of Swart’s Neuroscience For Leadership class at MIT in April, she discussed the serious health consequences that come from neglecting shut-eye. Swart, who is also a leadership coach, has been instructing executives to sleep for years. She promotes techniques related to diet and exercise, and warns that sleeping next to your smartphone—the one that emits 3G and 4G signals all night—affects your brain patterns, restructuring your brain cells and likely preventing you from allowing your brain to clean out waste material properly."


Via Dennis Richards, Rui Guimarães Lima
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chris's curator insight, June 14, 10:16 AM

If only getting eight hours of sleep a night was as easy as doctors make it seem. 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Didactics and Technology in Education
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Download and Convert Any YouTube Video: WonTube

Download and Convert Any YouTube Video: WonTube | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Robin Good: If you are looking for an easy solution to your need to either download or convert YouTube videos, WonTube has a solution that works well while being fully integrated with your preferred browser.

Whether you like Chrome, Firefox, Safari or IE there is a dedicated "add-on" for you right on this page: http://www.shareyoutubemp3.com/addon.html ;

Once installed, go to any YouTube video and you will see two new green buttons right above the clip.

The first one, allows you to download any YouTube video at your preferred resolution, from HD 1080p to FLV low-quality at 240p. You choose.

The second one allows you to download the video clip as an .MP3 file.

 

Very useful. 9/10

 

Downloadable versions:

An Android version of the video downloader is also available here: http://www.wontube.com/free-youtube-downloader.html as well as free desktop versions for PC and Mac video converter tool http://www.wontube.com/free-video-converter.html ;

 

More info: http://www.wontube.com/ ;

 

Try it out now: http://www.shareyoutubemp3.com/addon.html

N.B.: No ads, no registration, no fee (no business model, and no names of people behind it. The add-on browser version seems to carry no threat whatsoever).


Via Robin Good, Marc Wachtfogel, PhD, Rui Guimarães Lima
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When Digital Identity Begins | Student Affairs and Technology | InsideHigherEd

When Digital Identity Begins | Student Affairs and Technology | InsideHigherEd | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

My parents purchased a "real" computer when I was a senior in high school. It was the replacement for our Commodore 64. Beloved as it was, the "Commodore" and its dot matrix printer wasn't exactly high-tech in 1995. However, with over a gigabyte of hard drive space, Windows 95, and a mouse, the new machine was epic. And, it offered up a portal to the outside (digital) world via dial-up Internet. I was hooked...and patient. Getting connected wasn't easy and the web was quite young. A year after that, I had my first email account and was surfing the emerging web.

 

Little did I know that I was learning how to "be" on the web and establishing my digital identity during those early days. Usernames, long-forgotten and usually anonymous, were often nicknames with my birth year attached to them. Fast forward to the present, and digital identity plays a big part in my life.

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Teaching with Digital Technologies Infographic

Teaching with Digital Technologies Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Technology has had a huge impact on educating students around the world so it’s no surprise that it is being heavily incorporated into classrooms. From computers to tablets and pretty soon virtual reality field trips, technology has opened the door to possibilities we never could have imagined. The Teaching with Digital Technologies Infographic shows what teachers and students think about the potential of digital technologies in educational setting.
Facts and Stats

* 74% of teachers believe that technology enables them to reinforce and expand their content.
* 60% of high school seniors and college students believe that technology helps them study more efficiently and perform better in class.
* 93% of teachers agree that digital resources help their students academic achievement.
* 95% of teachers agree that digital resource engage their students in learning.

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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Moodle and Web 2.0
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Free Video Chat & Conferencing Tools and How to Use Them

Free Video Chat & Conferencing Tools and How to Use Them | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Tips and Resources for Using Free Video Conferencing Tools in Your Classroom Video conferencing and chat tools can be a wonderful instructional resource, as most educators know. You can bring the outside world and guests into your classroom, enable a

Via Nik Peachey, Annie Gual-Arnoux Gwynn, Juergen Wagner
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Mª Jesús García S.M.'s curator insight, June 14, 6:26 AM

Tips for flipping lessons!

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, June 14, 2:15 PM

Skype, Google Hangouts plus more...

Apollo B. Gabazira's curator insight, June 18, 12:01 AM

Certainly the new paradigm to doing bisiness  - whether in the claassroon or company board room ..... We have to get used to this 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Education 2.0 & 3.0
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How Classroom Design Impacts Learning and Engagement Infographic

How Classroom Design Impacts Learning and Engagement Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
How Classroom Design Impacts Learning and Engagement Infographic
To complementary studies conducted by The University of Salford have shown that classroom design has a profound influence on learning and engagement.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Armando's curator insight, June 14, 9:53 AM

How Classroom Design Impacts Learning and Engagement Infographic

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Assessment | Learning and Teaching | Coaching
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[Infographic] Bloom's Digital Taxonomy Verbs

[Infographic] Bloom's Digital Taxonomy Verbs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When using Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy (a revised take on Bloom’s devised by educator Andrew Churches), it helps to have a list of taxonomy verbs to know what actions define each stage of the taxonomy. This is useful for lesson planning, rubric making, and any other teacher-oriented task requiring planning and assessment strategies.

The Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy verbs in this handy infographic apply specifically to each stage of the taxonomy, from LOTS (lower-order thinking skills) to the HOTS (higher-order thinking skills).

According to Churches on his wiki Edorigami, “Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy describes many traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions, but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies …” This means the revised Digital Taxonomy verbs listed below are applicable to you facilitating technology use in the modern classrooms.

We hope you find this infographic of Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy verbs useful in your classroom practices. Please feel free to share it with colleagues you feel may benefit from having a list of taxonomy verbs!

Via Edumorfosis, Ines Bieler
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Educational Technology News
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How to Teach Concepts (and Make Them Crystal Clear) in eLearning

How to Teach Concepts (and Make Them Crystal Clear) in eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
As an instructional designer, you will have to teach concepts. Here’s a three-step process to help you teach concepts in eLearning.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Difundi's curator insight, June 16, 10:32 AM

Pasos simples y claros para conseguir enseñar conceptos y que "se anclen" bien en la cabeza del alumno: definir los conceptos, presentar ejemplos y exponer analogías. Fácil decirlo, difícil de conseguir siempre.

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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Engaging your learner - four dos and four don'ts - Clive on Learning

Engaging your learner - four dos and four don'ts - Clive on Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Whether you’re teaching in a classroom, developing some e-learning or producing a video, you’ll be concerned about engaging your learners. Why? Because, if learners aren’t engaged they’ll pay little attention to what you’re offering and they’re very unlikely to retain anything. You can spend a fortune trying to engage learners, but the secrets to engagement do not demand you break the bank. Here are four dos and four don’ts:

Via John Evans
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Easy MOOC
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MOOCs and pedagogy: where are we heading?

Impact of MOOCs on the university. Presentation given at EUNIS2015 http://www.eunis.org/eunis2015/

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


Via Lucas Gruez
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5 Outside of the Box Assessments Ideas

5 Outside of the Box Assessments Ideas | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
As another school year comes to a close, many of us are designing our end of the year assessments or knee deep grading them. For those still in the planning stages of their end of the year assessments, I want to encourage you to think outside of the box. The final assessment does not have to be a pen and paper or scantron exam. We have one last opportunity to engage students and ask them to demonstrate higher-order thinking and creativity in their final assessment. However, this requires that we demonstrate the same level of creativity in the design of that assessment.

Not all students do their best work with a pen and paper (or a pencil and scantron), so it’s unfortunate that those are the primary modes of assessing what students know. Each time I’ve assigned an alternative form of assessment, like the ones below, I’ve been absolutely floored by what my students create. There are always a collection of students who don’t do well on traditional exams and writing assignments who shine when asked to think outside the box and create!

Here are 5 of my favorite “outside the box” assessments! Just click the title to read more about each!
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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teachers Who Use Educational Technology Infographic

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teachers Who Use Educational Technology Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teachers Who Use Educational Technology Infographic clarifies some of the habits highly-effective educators who utilize learning technologies might possess.

Via ghbrett, Heather Peretz, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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