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Some Things You Can Do In Your Sleep, Literally

Some Things You Can Do In Your Sleep, Literally | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
For those who think there are not enough hours in the day, researchers may have just offered you a solution. The brain can continue tasks even while asleep, a study finds. Texting not included, alas.

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Special edition on research on MOOCs in the journal ‘Distance Education’

Special edition on research on MOOCs in the journal ‘Distance Education’ | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Tony Bates:

 

"The August 2014 edition of the Australian-based journal, Distance Education (Vol.35, No. 2.), is devoted to new research on MOOCs. There is a guest editor, Kemi Jona, from Northwestern University, Illinois, as well as the regular editor, Som Naidu.
The six articles in this edition are fascinating, both in terms of their content, but even more so in their diversity. There are also three commentaries, by Jon Baggaley, Gerhard Fischer and myself."


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, September 30, 12:56 PM

Tony Bates is a wise practitioner and one of the true pioneers in online teaching and learning.  This article includes his commentary on the articles published by the Australian journal Distance Education.  


For a research based look at Moocs, with a helping of commentary by highly experiences online teachers and thinkers... this is the place to start. 

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Making Friends With Failure

Making Friends With Failure | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There is a major disconnect between schools and the real world on the notion of failure. School teaches us there is only one answer for every problem. And if we don't get it, we are a failure. This dissuades students from trying -- they fear failure. We need to teach students how to make friends with failure.
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The Top 5 Blended And Flipped Classroom Tools

The Top 5 Blended And Flipped Classroom Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Blended learning is an environment in which students study in a “blended” model of face-to-face instruction with a teacher and technology-based instruction to meet their educational needs.

 


Via Nik Peachey
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Joaquín Ballester's curator insight, October 1, 5:13 PM

#flippedclassroom #evernote #blended 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 2, 2:35 AM
NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development Research Capacity-Building in Africa The Top 5 Blended And Flipped Classroom Tools
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Silk – Publish your data online

Silk – Publish your data online | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Tired of sending out the same old static PDFs, spreadsheets or links from Google Docs?
Use Silk to make a fully interactive site that engages users and encourages them to play with your data.

 


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Miguel Paul Trijaud Calderón's curator insight, October 1, 1:31 AM

Silk - Present your KPIS and figures. Export the data from your spreadsheet automatically.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, October 1, 10:33 PM

Looks interesting. 

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The Human Brain (HD full documentary) - History.com

Using simple analogies, real-life case studies, and state-of-the-art CGI, this special shows how the brain works, explains the frequent battle between instinct and reason, and unravels the mysteries of memory and decision-making. It takes us inside the mind of a soldier under fire to see how decisions are made in extreme situations, examines how an autistic person like Rain Man develops remarkable skills, and takes on the age-old question of what makes one person good and another evil. Research is rushing forward. We've learned more about the workings of the brain in the last five years than in the previous one hundred.

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PracTICE: Put Students In The Drivers Seat | How To!?

PracTICE: Put Students In The Drivers Seat | How To!? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

.PracTICE: Put Students In The Drivers Seat | How To!? Let us first have a look on WHAT is needed in the 21st Century from OUR Students, check the screenshot below, please. . . 

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 28, 10:00 AM

.PracTICE: Put Students In The Drivers Seat | How To!? Let us first have a look on WHAT is needed in the 21st Century from OUR Students, check the screenshot below, please. . . 


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/


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User Generated Education - How Educators Can Assist Learners in Developing a Growth Mindset

User Generated Education - How Educators Can Assist Learners in Developing a Growth Mindset | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The educator, as a growth mindset facilitator and coach, has a different, often unique, set of beliefs about students learning and growth. The following infographic shows (1) the common beliefs of an educator who promotes a growth mindset, and (2) some reflection questions about instructional practices that reinforce the growth mindset:

Via John Evans
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How Big The Internet Of Things Could Become

How Big The Internet Of Things Could Become | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

75 billion. That's the potential size of the Internet Things sector, which could become a multi-trillion dollar market by the end of the decade.

 

That's a very big number of devices that Morgan Stanley has extrapolated from a Cisco report that details how many devices will be connected to the Internet of Things by 2020. That's 9.4 devices for every one of the 8 billion people that's expected to be around in seven years.


To help put that into more perspective, back in Cisco also came out with the number of devices it thinks were connected to the Internet in 2012, a number Cisco's Rob Soderbery placed at 8.7 billion. Most of the devices at the time, he acknowledged were the PCs, laptops, tablets and phones in the world. But other types of devices will soon dominate the collection of the Internet of Things, such as sensors and actuators.


By the end of the decade, a nearly nine-fold increase in the volume of devices on the Internet of Things will mean a lot of infrastructure investment and market opportunities will available in this sector. And by "a lot," I mean ginourmous. In an interview with Barron's, Cisco CEO John Chambers figures that will translate to a $14-trillion industry.


Granted, Cisco has a lot of reasons to be bullish about the prospect of the Internet of Things: with product offerings in the router and switch space and a recent keen interest on building intelligent routing and application platforms right inside those devices, Cisco stands to gain a lot of business if it can get itself out in front of this newfangled Internet of Things.


It's not just Cisco talking up the Internet of Things: late last week, Morgan Stanley published a big 29-page research note on the topic that sought to at once define the Internet of Things and also quantify its size, growth and potential to make money.

 See also: Cisco Hearts Internet Of Things
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
This chart shows the lexical distance — that is, the degree of overall vocabulary divergence — among the major languages of Europe.

The size of each circle represents the number of speakers for that language. Circles of the same color belong to the same language group. All the groups except for Finno-Ugric (in yellow) are in turn members of the Indo-European language family.

English is a member of the Germanic group (blue) within the Indo-European family. But thanks to 1066, William of Normandy, and all that, about 75% of the modern English vocabulary comes from French and Latin (ie the Romance languages, in orange) rather than Germanic sources. As a result, English (a Germanic language) and French (a Romance language) are actually closer to each other in lexical terms than Romanian (a Romance language) and French.

So why is English still considered a Germanic language? Two reasons. First, the most frequently used 80% of English words come from Germanic sources, not Latinate sources. Those famous Anglo-Saxon monosyllables live on! Second, the syntax of English, although much simplified from its Old English origins, remains recognizably Germanic. The Norman conquest added French vocabulary to the language, and through pidginization it arguably stripped out some Germanic grammar, but it did not ADD French grammar.

The original research data for the chart comes from K. Tyshchenko (1999), Metatheory of Linguistics. (Published in Russian.)
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9 Strategies To Maximize Your E-Learning Outcome

9 Strategies To Maximize Your E-Learning Outcome | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The very nature of Learning Management Systems allows for a host of customizations and unique strategies to be implemented, based on the needs of the institution using it. When implementing a LMS for training purposes, developing a strategy for its use can often be a daunting task. Indeed, the possible LMS strategies can be limited only by the imagination of those using it. However, usage trends can be utilized for the purposes of developing a list of the best, and most common, strategic directives.
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Honesty: The Plain and Simple Truth

Honesty: The Plain and Simple Truth | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The value of honesty cannot be overstated. It’s critical to always tell the truth or the truth will tell on you.

 

What would happen if lying were the norm? Spouses wouldn’t be able to trust one another; leaders wouldn’t be credible; and the news would be meaningless. Everything, and I mean everything, depends on honesty. That’s why it’s so critical to tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 27, 11:31 AM
The value of honesty cannot be overstated. It’s critical to always tell the truth or the truth will tell on you.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Character


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The Power of "I Don't Know"

The Power of "I Don't Know" | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

At the start of each year, I have to train students that I will not be feeding them answers. I will not be having them copy notes from the board. I will not hand out copies of words and definitions for them to study. I will not hand them fill-in-the-blank paragraphs that we will all fill in together.

Rather, I will teach them how to develop questions. And when they ask me for answers, I will happily and without embarrassment, reply with, "I don't know."

I will also teach them that when I ask them a question it's OK if they say, "I don't know." I won't make them feel bad for not knowing the answer. Instead, I will spend vital time teaching them that when "I don't know" pops into one's head, it is the trigger to find out. For me, the guide in the room, that means making sure that my own attitude does not reflect our society's assumption that "I don't know" is a weakness.

"I don't know" has been so negatively ingrained that it can make a student feel powerless enough that just the mere inkling of it tickling their brain can shut down learning. But to make "I don't know" a more positive phrase takes targeted lessons in empowering students to conquer their own confusion. It's important to permit them confusion, to permit them to admit that the pathway before them is blocked with overgrown foliage and weeds. Then you hand them a mental machete to clear the way themselves.

One way to give power to an "I don't know" attitude is to teach internet literacy early and often, giving students the power to seek out answers themselves.

Today, I'm going to share the first three lessons I do to teach online literacy, and those that focus the most on harnessing the power of the search bar so that "I don't know" can really mean, "Wait! Let me find out!"

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There's no app for good teaching

There's no app for good teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"Bringing technology into the classroom often winds up an awkward mash-up between the laws of Murphy and Moore: What can go wrong, will — only faster.

 

It’s a multi-headed challenge: Teachers need to connect with classrooms filled with distinct individuals. We all want learning to be intrinsically motivated and mindful, yet we want kids to test well and respond to bribes (er, extrinsic rewards). Meanwhile, there’s a multi-billion-dollar industry, in the US alone, hoping to sell apps and tech tools to school boards.

 

There’s no app for that."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 30, 10:07 PM

There may not be apps for good teaching but there are ways to think about how you use technology that will improve the classroom. This post provides 8 recommendations. They are listed below but check out the post for additional information.

1. Keep learning goals ahead of the technology.

2. Opt for the open ended.

3. Don't let tech make learning easy.

4. Take feedback seriously.

5. Stay skeptical of individualized learning - for now.

6. Bring in students interests, authentically.

7. Start conversations

8. Make it open, make it better.

There is a lot of food for thought in this post.

Paul Nielsen's curator insight, September 30, 11:03 PM

Great reminder that embedding learning in technology is not a 'revolutionary takeover' of the classroom. To my sceptical colleagues here in the UK, your jobs and traditional teaching methods are quite safe.

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Is Social Media Transforming Behaviours And How We Work ?

Is Social Media Transforming Behaviours And How We Work ? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
How Social Media Transforms Behaviours And Will Transform Work As the astute already realise, we are currently going through a period of tremendous change.

...

Solis explains that while computers, laptops, mobile phones and even the internet have not fundamentally transformed how we behave, in fact social networks and social media have. Solis argues that all of our previous change was still managed in a “command and control” style and all of it was guided to drive productivity. However, changes in social media and mobile and particularly the two combined as well as cloud and real time data has changed all of this. It has led to a transformation in the working world. And Solis believes that the decisions that we make now will impact what is possible (or not) in the future.


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MOOC U: The Revolution Isn't Over

MOOC U: The Revolution Isn't Over | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Whether MOOCs follow through on their pledge to alter higher education and, in the process, reduce costs and improve outcomes for everyone depends on whether colleges and the MOOC providers tackle the difficult questions facing them in the next few years while they are out of the media spotlight.



Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Maslow and Student Motivation

Maslow and Student Motivation | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There is no such thing as an unmotivated student. All students are motivated by something in school. The problem is that they might not be motivated by the things you'd like them to be motivated by...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 29, 6:37 PM

Another question that has one looking at Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, this time with the primary question geared to students: Why do students try in school?

Below are the five areas and what may be motivating the student.

* Survival - "I am in danger here or at home. I'm motivated by fear (intrinsic)."

* Self-care - "I'm motivated to stay afloat and avoid more work (extrinsic).

* Belonging - "I'm motivated by friends, family, and parents (extrinsic).

* Esteem - "I'm motivated because it makes me feel good about myself (both).

* Self-actualization - "I'm motivated in school because its important work (intrinsic)."

In each of the five areas you will find four to six statements that provide more depth to the statement.

Tony Meehan's curator insight, September 30, 2:40 AM

Very interesting table linking Maslow to levels of student motivation

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How to use open source tool Xerte | Opensource.com

How to use open source tool Xerte | Opensource.com | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
An excellent, easy to use, open source alternative is Xerte, a learning object creation tool developed by the University of Nottingham.

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Diversifying the Role Course Content Plays

Diversifying the Role Course Content Plays | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Teaching Professor Blog -

 

We all pretty much agree that we try to cover too much material in our courses, programs, and majors, but the thought of leaving things out often causes personal and profession anguish. We argue with ourselves that a certain piece of content is too important to cut, and our students need to know the information to pass certifying exams and to get jobs. Then there are departmental expectations. Most courses establish knowledge bases for subsequent courses. Our colleagues are depending on us. We further complicate matters by making course and instructor reputations a function of content quantity. A decrease in the amount covered means lower standards and a dilution of the intellectual currency of the course. Bottom line: We know we’ve got a problem, but these realities and our thinking have us backed into a corner.


Burkholder asks a question that creates some space in which to move. “What should the role of content be?” I vote for multiple roles.

-


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, September 27, 11:35 PM

Useful insights that might shake up your assumptions just a bit. 

Donna Farren's curator insight, September 30, 10:57 AM

Great insight coming at a great time!  I just said to a colleague I have about 5 days worth of content ready for a two and a half hour training!  How to scale back is always my dilemma.  Especially in introductory classes - how much is enough to get people going?  I appreciate this post and will refer to it often. 

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Lifelong Learners: How Teachers Develop New Skills and Improve Their Practice | Tech Learning

Lifelong Learners: How Teachers Develop New Skills and Improve Their Practice | Tech Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The Resource for Education Technology Leaders focusing on K-12 educators. Site contains a Software Reviews Database, articles from Technology & Learning Magazine, articles from Educators in Educators' eZine, Event and Contest listings, Reader suggested Web sites, and weekly news updates on education technology leaders.

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Helen Teague's curator insight, September 28, 12:23 PM

Just as teachers and parents want students to keep learning, administrators want teachers to keep improving. Here’s a look at how schools and districts make it easy for teachers to continue their learning. - See more at: http://www.techlearning.com/features/0039/lifelong-learners-how-teachers-develop-new-skills-and-improve-their-practice/55247#sthash.0EbWszar.dpuf

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Integrated Studies Research Review | What Is Integrated Studies?

Integrated Studies Research Review | What Is Integrated Studies? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Learn why and how integrated studies can be effective and get recommendations for evidence-based practices and programs.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 28, 2:52 PM

Pure THEORY, BUT anyway worth to read...


Xavier Fazio's curator insight, October 5, 11:29 AM

Nothing more practical than a good theory...

 

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The art of choosing

The art of choosing | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Sheena Iyengar studies how we make choices -- and how we feel about the choices we make. At TEDGlobal, she talks about both trivial choices (Coke v. Pepsi) and profound ones, and shares her groundbreaking research that has uncovered some surprising attitudes about our decisions.
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If only I could stop grading, teaching would really be fun - 4 Reasons Every Teacher Wants to Stop Grading

If only I could stop grading, teaching would really be fun - 4 Reasons Every Teacher Wants to Stop Grading | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
1-Grading is long on time and short on reward

Unless you’re running a bubble test through a scanner, grading papers, labs, and projects can take an immense amount of time. For teachers who have 120 or more students, grading one assignment can take up to 10 hours. Then, the activity is returned, and many students say “Why did you give me a D?” Students with low grades blame the teacher, students with high grades take all the credit, and those in the middle–C grades–are happy to receive neither praise nor punishment. There’s very little return on investment here.

2-Grading is an inexact science

Some teachers love to argue that grades are fair, because they are based on a purportedly-objective formula. The problem is that all rubrics, numbers and letters are subjective. The teacher makes all of the decisions about the assignment and the assessment tool, leaving the student’s voice out of a non-existent conversation. In the end, opinion always plays a role. In many cases the teacher’s final judgment is subconscious. She doesn’t even realize that the only reason Emily got that A is because she’s perceived as an A student–just like Johnny has always been a D student, no matter what the numbers say.

3-Grading is nothing more than basic math, or is it?

My daughter recently got a D- on a 10-point quiz. She answered seven items correctly, and she forgot to answer one question. According to the teacher’s answer sheet, Lauren answered 70 percent of the items correctly, only to see a bright D- on her work. She actually cried, because she’s been conditioned by a traditional education system that anything less than a B means she’s stupid. In another school, her 70% would have been a C. Some teachers would have reminded her to answer the blank item, and her score could have gone to 80% and a B. This basic math can be manipulated many ways. Ultimately, the numbers say nothing about what Lauren learned that day–other than perhaps her teacher believes that she is a poor student.

4-Grading has absolutely nothing to do with learning

“She’s an A student,” was the guidance counselor’s description of a young lady I asked about one year. When I mentioned another student, she said, “Oh, he’s a D.” Just what do these letters mean? In 20 years as a classroom teacher, I’ve known A students who couldn’t put three coherent sentences together and often shrugged when asked to answer a complex question. They were very good at finishing assignments and giving back information on multiple choice tests. One year, I had a student who failed a grade and was steadily making D’s and F’s in his return to the seventh grade. I noticed this kid devoured books; he always preferred reading to other class work. He and I had some of the most thought-provoking conversations I’d ever had with a 12-year-old. To the average onlooker, he was a failure. To me, he was a brilliant young man, who hated traditional education. His grades said nothing about his learning, just as those A’s say little about the so-called “good” students.
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101 Things I've Learned So Far In Teaching - TeachThought

101 Things I've Learned So Far In Teaching - TeachThought | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

 "The title is self-explanatory and the context is fairly clear. Well, actually it probably should’ve been title “101 things I think I think about teaching,” because what I think I think changes almost daily. Here we are nonetheless."


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5 Fresh PowerPoint Alternatives

5 Fresh PowerPoint Alternatives | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

PowerPoint. Everyone’s used it, everyone’s heard of it, and a lot of people are pretty tired of it. Have you found yourself seeking an exciting new angle to approach your presentations from? If so, try these five fresh PowerPoint alternatives on for size.

 


Via Baiba Svenca
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Don Karp's curator insight, October 3, 5:06 PM

Something to consider.

Susan C. Freeman's curator insight, October 16, 3:42 PM

For those who fear death by PowerPoint (of whom I am  not).

 

A GREAT PowerPoint is compelling, entertaining and memorable!