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Protecting Privacy In The Digital Age: Mikko Hyppönen Answers Your Questions

Protecting Privacy In The Digital Age: Mikko Hyppönen Answers Your Questions | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Mikko Hyppönen is a "white hat" hacker — one of the good guys. Since Edward Snowden's revelations about the NSA's widespread surveillance, he has become a leading critic of the agency's programs. Hyppönen says we shouldn't be willing to relinquish our privacy, but rather demand it from our government.

Hyppönen was featured on the TED Radio Hour episode The End Of Privacy and answer listener's questions about his work.
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Scoop.it found #1 content curation platform in 2014 Content Curation Survey by MyNews.is

Scoop.it found #1 content curation platform in 2014 Content Curation Survey by MyNews.is | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Is content curation the new big thing of content marketing and building a brand?


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, October 6, 1:58 PM

News Reading App MyNews.is published an interesting survey on why and how content curation is being used in 2014. Among other interesting findings, we were excited to discover that Scoop.it was ranked as the leading one.

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Dr. George Siemens: “The Meaning of Connectivism for Learning Design”

Conversatorio con facultad y estudiantes graduados. Celebrado el 14 de octubre de 2010 en la Universidad del Sagrado Corazón.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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8 Great Ways to use Technology in the Classroom to Create Lessons That Aren’t Boring

8 Great Ways to use Technology in the Classroom to Create Lessons That Aren’t Boring | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Dozens of free web tools and ideas that can pack a technology integration punch and kick those lessons up a notch Are you tired of delivering the same old

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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11 Tips to Engage and Inspire Adult Learners - eLearning Industry

11 Tips to Engage and Inspire Adult Learners - eLearning Industry | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Designing eLearning deliverables that motivate and engage adult learners can be challenging. However, creating top notch eLearning deliverables that cater to adult learners comes with its own unique set of challenges. The good news is that there are a number of tips and techniques that can help you to create meaningful educational experiences for adult learners, which can be applied to eLearning courses and online training events.
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What the Heck is Scoop.it?

What the Heck is Scoop.it? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

It’s a user-friendly content curation tool with a social component, creating a one-stop environment for learning, sharing and connecting. (...)
There are many things about Scoop.it that I love. Its Pinterest-like boards provide the headline, image and the first few lines of copy, allowing for a quick scan of content. Scoop.it’s suggested content is always spot on (...) it’s easy (and the integration with other social networks is great)."


Via Marc Rougier
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Marc Rougier's curator insight, October 4, 3:12 AM

Thanks much Stacy Firth for this description of Scoop.it (and thanks for the positive comments!). Very accurate.


And yes Marketers are the number one users of Scoop.it!


As a complement, integration with Wordpress, branding (up to white lable) and analytics are probably the most popular benefits of the premium plans.


Indeed there is a social component to Scoop.it: the community of curators is leveraged to discover content and engage with like-minded people. It's secondary to the prime mission (publishing-by-curation platform), but we'll take into account the remarks about upgrading this social dimension. Noted!


PS: I like the title and the concept of this series :)

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6 Principles Of Genius Hour In The Classroom

6 Principles Of Genius Hour In The Classroom | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
6 Principles Of Genius Hour In The Classroom

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Eileen Forsyth's curator insight, October 10, 11:54 AM

In other words, my independent study...

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, October 12, 6:46 AM

6 principios da "Hora Genial " na Sala de aula:

Hora Genial permite liberdade aos aprendizes para desenharem sua aprendizagem. durante o periodo da aula. Sao estimulados a explorarem suas proprias curiosidades, e construirem e organziarem seu conheimento durante a aula. Para que isso se concretize, devem seguir os 6 principios:


1- regra 80/20

2- socializacao

3- criacao

4- requerimento de informacao

5- consolidacao (desenho)

6- proposito


Miguel Damiani's curator insight, October 12, 1:12 PM

Seis principios que todo profesor debe tener en cuenta en su clase

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Even if "my brain made me do it," neuroscience does not threaten people's sense of free will

Even if "my brain made me do it," neuroscience does not threaten people's sense of free will | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

A key finding from neuroscience research over the last few decades is that non-conscious preparatory brain activity appears to precede the subjective feeling of making a decision. Some neuroscientists, like Sam Harris, have argued that this shows our sense of free will is an illusion, and that lay people would realize this too if they were given a vivid demonstration of the implications of the science (see below). Books have even started to appear with titles like My Brain Made Me Do It: The Rise of Neuroscience and the Threat to Moral Responsibility by Eliezer J. Sternberg.

However, in a new paper, Eddy Nahmias, Jason Shepard and Shane Reuter counter such claims. They believe that Harris and others (who they dub "willusionists") make several unfounded assumptions about the foundations of most people's sense of free will. Using a series of vivid hypothetical scenarios based on Harris’ own writings, Nahmias and his colleagues tested whether people's belief in free will really is challenged by "neuroprediction" - the idea of neuroscientists using brain activity to predict a person's choices, and by the related notion that mental activity is no more than brain activity.


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46 Hidden Tips and Tricks to Use Google Search Like a Boss: Infographic

46 Hidden Tips and Tricks to Use Google Search Like a Boss: Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

How often do you use Google to find something on the internet?

If like a lot of people you use Google every day you’ll be astounded by the number of hidden tips and tricks their search facility offers.

Find 46 of them featured in this infographic.


Via Lauren Moss, Lourense Das, Evdokia Roka, Juergen Wagner
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Grisell Rodriguez's curator insight, October 10, 8:50 AM

Nice infographic for library instruction

Venkatesh Iyer (venkyiyer.com)'s curator insight, October 11, 12:36 AM

Some good stuff here.

Smith_Lin's curator insight, October 13, 12:46 PM

All stuff we knew but a pretty way to show it

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Do I Only Use 10% of My Brain? - YouTube

SciShow debunks the myth that you only use 10 percent of your brain. So, how much do you really use? And how do we know? Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Lik...

Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, October 2, 7:17 PM

SciShow has a go at debunking this myth. Too much talking for my liking. Show more brain scans!

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Move Students Away from Memorizing and Regurgitating - FRACTUS LEARNING

Move Students Away from Memorizing and Regurgitating - FRACTUS LEARNING | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In this fascinating and inspiring TEDx talk, Philip Kovacs, Associate Professor of Education at UAH in Huntsville, discusses how he is working to convince schools and school systems to stop using textbooks and instead to harness the power of the web.

I first came across Philip’s work after reading a brilliant piece he wrote titled An Open Letter to My Son’s Kindergarten Teacher. If you haven’t read it, then get onto it immediately, if you have, then I am sure you will enjoy his thought provoking video below.

Via John Evans
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Evernote Tips: The 11 Amazing Features That Make Using Evernote So Freaking Awesome

Get new video updates via email - "http://www.ScottBradley.name/evernotetips - Watch this video to uncover 11 Evernote tips that illustrate why Evernote is so amazing for busy professionals and entrepreneurs to use in their life to help them grow their business."


Via Jim Lerman
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The Educator with a Growth Mindset

Presentation materials for an educator inservice on growth mindsets. Includes background information, historical perspectives, a self-assessment, and strategi…

 


Via Gust MEES
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Margarita Parra's curator insight, October 3, 10:03 AM

Abrirse a las ideas, explorar alternativas, aprender de otros, utilizar eficientemente los recursos tecnológicos, colaborar, compartir,...

Chris Carter's curator insight, October 3, 8:48 PM

Ready-to-go presentation

Tony Meehan's curator insight, October 4, 5:49 AM

All you need to introduce a growth mindset culture, anywhere, comprehensively and generously compiled by @JackieGerstein Ed.D.

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Content Curation: Goals, Usage and Tools - Survey

The results of the content curation survey 2014 by MyNews.is


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Barbara Vermaas's curator insight, October 7, 3:22 AM

Nieuwsartikel over content curation in 2014

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 7, 4:00 AM
Content Curation: Goals, Usage and Tools - Survey
Linda Kaiser, PhD's curator insight, October 10, 3:20 PM

This presentation gives some interesting insights to current content curators including their preferred curation tool of choice and other demographics.

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Top MOOC provider edX no longer free for all

Top MOOC provider edX no longer free for all | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Leading MOOC provider edX has broken from its fee-free ethos and will charge for professional education courses starting next year.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.'s curator insight, October 5, 10:45 PM
EdX says the professional education courses will be aimed at specific industries or professional skill sets with an emphasis on hands-on learning.

Stephanie Carter's curator insight, October 6, 12:22 PM

If other MOOC providers follow suit, I wonder if this would have an effect on the continuing education world of professional certifications, credentials and intensive one-year master's programs. Hello, Graduate/Professional Education. My name is "MOOC".

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What Is Education? Insights From The World's Greatest Minds

What Is Education? Insights From The World's Greatest Minds | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"As we seek to refine and reform today’s system of education, we would do well to ask, 'What is education?' Our answers may provide insights that get to the heart of what matters for 21st century children and adults alike. It is important to step back from divisive debates on grades, standardized testing, and teacher evaluation—and really look at the meaning of education. So I decided to do just that—to research the answer to this straightforward, yet complex question. Looking for wisdom from some of the greatest philosophers, poets, educators, historians, theologians, politicians, and world leaders, I found answers that should not only exist in our history books, but also remain at the core of current education dialogue. In my work as a developmental psychologist, I constantly struggle to balance the goals of formal education with the goals of raising healthy, happy children who grow to become contributing members of families and society. Along with academic skills, the educational journey from kindergarten through college is a time when young people develop many interconnected abilities." | by Marilyn Price-Mitchell

 

- The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done. -- Jean Piaget, 1896-1980, Swiss developmental psychologist, philosopher

 

- Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school. Albert Einstein, 1879-1955, physicist

 



Via Todd Reimer, The Rice Process, Gust MEES
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Mindy Weidman's curator insight, October 6, 10:23 AM

What is education to you???

Vocabmonk's curator insight, October 7, 1:19 AM

Let's know what is Education 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 7, 4:35 AM

NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development Research Capacity-Building in Africa

 What Is Education? Insights From The World's Greatest Minds
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Top 5 Tips To Effectively Use Humor in eLearning - eLearning Industry

Top 5 Tips To Effectively Use Humor in eLearning - eLearning Industry | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
As any experienced eLearning professional will surely attest, when using humor in eLearning there are certain unspoken rules that one must follow. After all, what one learner may find hilarious, another might find offensive. For this very reason, I've decided to share a variety of tips that can help you to effectively use humor in your eLearning courses or online training events, so that you can successfully walk the fine line between entertaining and educational.
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Four trends in tech that every trainee teacher should know about

Four trends in tech that every trainee teacher should know about | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Future teachers should be aware of how classroom technology is changing tomorrow’s world of learning

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Alternative Assessment Methods for the Online Classroom

Alternative Assessment Methods for the Online Classroom | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Tests and quizzes are often the primary means of assessing online learner performance; however, as Rena Palloff and Keith Pratt, online instructors and coauthors of numerous online learning books, including Lessons from the Virtual Classroom: The Realities of Online Teaching (2013), point out, there are more effective and less problematic alternatives.

 

Authentic, learner-centered, collaborative assessment alternatives

Alternative assessment methods such as writing assignments, collaborative assignments, case studies, and debates can avoid the problems often associated with tests and quizzes. “There are many ways to approach assessment. It depends on the context of the course. When we teach faculty how to teach online, we try to give them a taste of a majority of those methods. I don’t know that we can cover all of them in one course, but there are multiple ways to get at the issues and make this a real-life situation for the students so they can actually learn from the process,” Pratt says.

Palloff and Pratt recommend selecting assessment methods that are learner-centered and authentic.

Learner-centered assessment methods address whether the learner has met the learning outcomes of the course as well as how the learner got there. “A learner-centered assessment is an assessment that links what the student is learning in the course to the assessment process,” Palloff says.

Authentic assessment methods can reduce cheating. One way to make assignments more authentic and less susceptible to cheating is to have students embed their own experiences in their assignments. “For example, if they are writing about human development, you can have them write about their own development. They’re writing about themselves, and that is very difficult to buy through a paper mill or to plagiarize,” Palloff says.

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Report Finds ‘Deeper Learning’ Model Improves Outcomes for All Students

Report Finds ‘Deeper Learning’ Model Improves Outcomes for All Students | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The conversation about what kids need to know and to be able to do by the end of high school has gradually shifted over the past several years to emphasize not just rigorous content goals, but also less tangible skills, such as creative thinking, problem-solving and collaboration. That shift has brought schools that are practicing “deeper learning” into focus.

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has been a big supporter of this work, defining deeper learning as a model that focuses on critical thinking, communication, collaboration, academic mindsets and learning how to learn, all through rigorous content. New research conducted by the American Institutes for Research (AIR) has found that the deeper learning model does have positive learning outcomes for students, regardless of their background.

The model is often critiqued as a framework that only works for high-achieving learners. The Hewlett Foundation commissioned this study to test whether the model works for all learners, choosing schools with a high proportion of low-income and English-language learners who often face more barriers to achievement. AIR investigators were also careful to choose schools that did not have a selective admissions process that might skew the student population toward high-achieving learners.

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Edutopia: Mastering Online Discussion Board Facilitation


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, September 20, 8:56 PM

Best practices, Netiquette, Time Management tips... all in one sweet pdf package.

Gary Harwell's curator insight, October 4, 3:05 AM

lots of good stuff here

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, October 4, 12:55 PM

A PDF with tons of great insights. 

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LinkedIn University Rankings ~ Stephen's Web

LinkedIn University Rankings ~ Stephen's Web | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
This has to be better than the made-up rankings provided by entities like U.S. News & World Report, or Macleans in Canada, but even so the purpose remains the same: the rankings reflect the values held by the ranker, and are intended to push the rankees into pursuing those metrics (hence, the U.S. News rankings, for example, push universities away from opening access to lower income students). Just so, the LinkedIn rankings are "based on career outcomes". The LinkedIn blog defines outcomes based on "desirable jobs," for examples, where "we define a desirable job to be a job at a desirable company for the relevant profession. For example, we define desirable finance jobs as finance jobs at companies desirable for finance professionals." So my university, the University of Calgary, which educated me very well indeed, would fail, because I did not get my (not so desirable) desirable job as a philosopher. More from PS Web. Via Academica.
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The Power of "I Don't Know"

The Power of "I Don't Know" | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Changing Attitudes
At the start of each year, I have to train students that I will not be feeding them answers. I will not be having them copy notes from the board. I will not hand out copies of words and definitions for them to study. I will not hand them fill-in-the-blank paragraphs that we will all fill in together.

Rather, I will teach them how to develop questions. And when they ask me for answers, I will happily and without embarrassment, reply with, "I don't know."

I will also teach them that when I ask them a question it's OK if they say, "I don't know." I won't make them feel bad for not knowing the answer. Instead, I will spend vital time teaching them that when "I don't know" pops into one's head, it is the trigger to find out. For me, the guide in the room, that means making sure that my own attitude does not reflect our society's assumption that "I don't know" is a weakness.

"I don't know" has been so negatively ingrained that it can make a student feel powerless enough that just the mere inkling of it tickling their brain can shut down learning. But to make "I don't know" a more positive phrase takes targeted lessons in empowering students to conquer their own confusion. It's important to permit them confusion, to permit them to admit that the pathway before them is blocked with overgrown foliage and weeds. Then you hand them a mental machete to clear the way themselves.

In the Classroom
One way to give power to an "I don't know" attitude is to teach internet literacy early and often, giving students the power to seek out answers themselves.

Today, I'm going to share the first three lessons I do to teach online literacy, and those that focus the most on harnessing the power of the search bar so that "I don't know" can really mean, "Wait! Let me find out!"

1. Make Google do the work. I do a quick exercise with my students about the brat that is the Google search. Incidentally, I give it a voice and personality for my students. I have them type into the standard search bar: video games in education and ask for the number of pages Google recommends. The answer is somewhere in the 800,000,000 range. "What?" I say as lazy Google. "I just gave you what you asked for." Then I challenge them to make Google do all the work. See, Google doesn't make people stupid, as a recent article once claimed. It just does what you ask it to, no more, no less. The challenge, then, is to think about how to be specific enough in your search that you make the search engine do the work for you.

From there, I have students customize the Google advanced search page. Use more specific key words; use the drop down menus such as those that focus on language, region, and date posted. Then, I show them how to filter for fair use. Then I have them click "Advanced Search." (From the results page, if you click on "Search Tools" you'll see the new number of hits.)

This leads to an inevitably more encouraging number than before. You might find that some students have only 5,000 hits. Some might have only 1,000. But what you're looking for are those students who can model what they did on the advanced search page that resulted in only 50 or 20 or even 10 hits that really apply to the topic. After all, if most students don't click past the first page of results on a search, it's vital to make sure that this first page is as applicable to their topic as possible.

2. Create a timed scavenger hunt. Group students with a short list of questions that need to be answered about a particular topic. Sure, I'm an English Language Arts teacher, but I ask eighth grade history questions on my scavenger hunt to reinforce the communication of content other than my own.

To find the answers, the students need to work together to develop the most efficient key word combinations to make Google do the more accurate searching for them. Make it a contest: Which group can most quickly find the correct answer, correctly cite the page on which it was found, and insert the answer and citation on the Google Document posted on the monitor in the front of the room?

3. Verify the Evidence. Embrace Wikipedia and all that it can teach. But make sure that a student knows the steps to verify what's legit and what's biased or even outright false. Wikipedia makes for a great lesson on keywords and main ideas. Take a passage that is related to your content. Have the students pull out the main facts, data, or keywords. Can they even recognize them? That's an informal assessment right there. Have them assemble these keywords into their own question and Google it. Have they found at least three other websites to corroborate the fact? I call this "triangulating the data," and it empowers students by giving them a strategy they can use to recognize falsehood online.

Sheridan Blau once said, "Honor confusion." The phase, "I don't know" is one that both honors confusion and stimulates the process of clearing it up.

How does your classroom honor "I don't know?" What strategies do you use to help them find their own answers? Please share in the comments section below.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, October 3, 11:06 AM

Terrific insights on making Google do the work for you...

Carey Leahy's curator insight, October 4, 1:32 AM

Showing students how to make Google do the work with more specific search terms.  Author suggests a 'Timed Treasure Hunt' and verifying the results....

Ken Morrison's comment, October 4, 7:50 AM
Thanks for the Rescoops!
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Google Reveals ‘The Physical Web,’ A Project To Make Internet Of Things Interaction App-Less | TechCrunch

Google Reveals ‘The Physical Web,’ A Project To Make Internet Of Things Interaction App-Less | TechCrunch | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Google’s Scott Jenson, an interaction and UX designer who left the company only to return to the Chrome team last November, has revealed a project underway at the company called The Physical Web to provide “interaction on demand” so that people can walk up and use any smart devices without the need for intervening mobile apps. This would make it possible for users to simply walk up to a bus stop and receive the time until the next arriving bus, without any additional software needed.

The project is an ambitious bet on the future of smart devices. Analysts are predicting explosions in connected devices over the next few years, with Cisco anticipating 50 billion Internet-connected gadgets in action by 2020, and Intel pegging the total at 15 billion by just next year. Google’s project, spearheaded by Jenson, would make it much easier for people to interact with the growing web of connected devices every day.

“People should be able to walk up to any smart device – a vending machine, a poster, a toy, a bus stop, a rental car – and not have to download an app first,” Jenson explains on the Physical Web project page. “Everything should be just a tap away.”
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MOOCs: A review - The Tech

MOOCs: A review - The Tech | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Despite the hype, MOOC providers do acknowledge that robust online education is in its infancy, and as The Times and NPR describe it, there are “kinks to be worked out.” Universities that offer online courses through edX or Coursera rightly worry about how exams will be administered, how cheaters will be identified, and how grading will be scaled to hundreds of thousands of students in a single course. A lot of smart people are coming up with clever ways to address all those problems, and more.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 2, 9:54 AM

MOOCs: A review - The Tech

Andy Powys's curator insight, October 20, 9:32 AM

Good source!