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The Top 100 Tools to Capture, Edit, Publish and Distribute Video Online

The Top 100 Tools to Capture, Edit, Publish and Distribute Video Online | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The best tools and services to capture, edit, publish and distribute video online.

Via Robin Good, Arthur Correia, Evdokia Roka, Dennis T OConnor
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 16, 9:20 PM

What an excellent list of video tools and resources from Robin Good. highly recommended 9.5/10.

Alison Rostetter's curator insight, August 19, 10:49 AM

Thanks to the collector, Robin Good, of this great list.  I'm sure many people will be interested to learn about all these sites

Julia Echeverría's curator insight, August 30, 1:49 PM

Excelente recopilación

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PLEs, CoPs and Connectivism: A Bee Fable - YouTube

A BSU Social Networks Learning Assignment

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UCI study finds that learning by repetition impairs recall of details

UCI study finds that learning by repetition impairs recall of details | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
UC Irvine neurobiologists Zachariah Reagh and Michael Yassa have found that while repetition enhances the factual content of memories, it can reduce the amount of detail stored with those memories. This means that with repeated recall, nuanced aspects may fade away. Their study appears this month in Learning & Memory.

...

"Yassa, an assistant professor of neurobiology & behavior, said that these findings do not discredit the practice of repetitive learning. However, he noted, pure repetition alone has limitations. For a more enriching and lasting learning experience through which nuance and detail are readily recalled, other memory techniques should be used to complement repetition."


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Neuroscientists say handwriting is good for you (Science Alert)

Neuroscientists say handwriting is good for you (Science Alert) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Using our keyboards saves us lots of precious time, but writing by hand has lots of benefits.

Researchers have shown that children who know how to write by hand learn to read faster. They are also better at retaining information and coming up with new ideas.

“When we write, a unique neural circuit is automatically activated. There is a core recognition of the gesture in the written word, a sort of recognition by mental simulation in your brain,” Stanislas Dehaene, a psychologist at the Collège de France in Paris, told The New York Times.

A study conducted at Indiana University, in the US, reported that when children write by hand three areas of the brain are activated—the left fusiform gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus and the posterior parietal cortex. These are the same areas that are set in motion when adults read and write. Kids who typed or just traced letters didn’t show any activation in these areas.

 

 

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Annel Montelongo's comment, June 30, 10:57 PM
Siempre he pensado que las actividades que realizamos a mano son de gran importancia ya que estimulan partes del cerebro que no pueden desarrollarse con otras actividades, como recientemente leía en uno de sus artículos publicados en el siglo de torreón en internet, usted ya recordara pero quiero mencionarlo:
Hablaba sobre la importancia de inculcar el arte a los niños ya que como ya mencione estimula las es sistema motriz a temprana edad y algunas partes de su cerebro se desarrollan más rápido esto permite que el niño o este caso los jóvenes capten más rápido las ideas planteadas.
Merci professeur , très utile ;)
La dulsura de las Matemáticas's curator insight, July 1, 1:27 AM

interesante hasta donde a podido llegar la ignorancia de nosotros mismos las culturas que se van fundando por moda. se ha dejado de escribir en libretas para escribir en computadoras ala bes es bueno porque te vas innovando y vas aprendiendo de la tecnología cada vez mas. ya que todo hoy en dia es basado en pura tecnología. 

Carolina Nuñez's comment, July 2, 7:39 PM
La costumbre de escribir a mano se va perdiendo poco a poco ya que con eso de que hoy en día los niños cada vez más prefieren usar la tecnología y van olvidando o mejor dicho se van haciendo flojos y ya ni el nombre quieren escribir a mano por el hecho de que les da flojera . pero esta mal porque cuando escribimos en cualquier teclado nos estamos olvidando de lo que de verdad importa e incluso te enseñas a escribir palabras mal escritas pero como al escribir por teclado es la moda todo mundo lo hace y si el cerebro se hace más lento en aprender pero ese es un problema de la sociedad que no ve lo que de verdad debe de ver y sigue haciendo que su cerebro no piense ya que lo único que piensa es que la tecnología lo hace todo.
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Using Prezi as a Teaching Tool


Via Kristin High, Juergen Wagner
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Dorian Love's curator insight, June 23, 5:50 PM

I find Prezi difficult to use

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Experiential learning | Learning with 'e's

Experiential learning | Learning with 'e's | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

John Dewey is one of the giants in the history of educational theory, and it's difficult to isolate one of his specific theories to discuss here. He was influential in so many areas of educational reform, that to choose one theme would do him a disservice, so I will highlight several of the areas in which he was ahead of his time.

The theory and how it can be applied to education

Even before the constructivist theories of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky were widely known, Dewey was talking about how children learn best when they interacted with their environments and were actively involved with the school curriculum. He rejected much of the prevalent theory of the time - behaviourism - as too simplistic and inadequate to explain complex learning processes. He argued that rather than the child being a passive recipient of knowledge, as was presumed by many educators of the time, children were better served if they took an active part in the process of their own learning. He also placed greater emphasis on the social context of learning. At the turn of the 20th Century, these were radical ideas.

Dewey further argued that for education to be at its most effective, children should be given learning opportunities that enabled them to link present content to previous experiences and knowledge. Again, this was a ground breaking idea for the period. Yet another feature in Dewey's theories was the need for learners to engage directly with their environment, in what came to be known as experiential learning, where 'knowledge comes from the impressions made upon us by natural objects.' This approach led later to a number of other similar approaches such as problem based learning and inquiry based learning.

Notwithstanding, Dewey was wary of placing too much emphasis on the child's abilities, but preferred to place his trust in a more balanced approach to education where teacher, students and content were given equal importance in the learning equation. Ultimately, his belief was that teachers should not be in the classroom to act simply as instructors, but should adopt the role of facilitator and guide, giving students the opportunities to discover for themselves and to develop as active and independent learners. In some schools, a return to these values is long overdue.

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EduGeek Journal » Designing a Dual Layer cMOOC/xMOOC

EduGeek Journal » Designing a Dual Layer cMOOC/xMOOC | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The main design issue seems to revolve around having multiple paths through the content, mostly focused on creating a connectivist, learner-centered group work approach for those that prefer it, and also an instructor-centered path that guides the learners through the process for those that want that.

 

Easy, right?

 

So the basic idea is that learners would enter the course and be presented with the option of going through one of the two routes. Maybe at some point an Artificial Intelligence data-driven program will even be able to recommend the path for them. Learners would enter one of the two paths and follow the paradigm presented. At any time that the learners on the cMOOC track need help (or at some point, when the AI data identifies a need), they can be directed towards the appropriate part of the xMOOC track for help. At any time the learners on the xMOOC track start to get comfortable with the idea of interacting with others (or the AI data identifies this), they can move into the cMOOC track. These movements could be a one time switch at any point, or a constant movement back and forth depending on the learner. Or the leaner could stick on the track they prefer the most. Or do both. Or lurk on one or the other or both. The system would basically look something like this:

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Maker Education and Experiential Education

Maker Education and Experiential Education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Since this discipline-learning philosophy has been around a lot longer than the more formalized, current maker education movement, those attempting to move maker education into more traditional educational settings might draw from the writings and literature of experiential education to help explain and contextualized maker education.



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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 22, 5:10 PM

Since this discipline-learning philosophy has been around a lot longer than the more formalized, current maker education movement, those attempting to move maker education into more traditional educational settings might draw from the writings and literature of experiential education to help explain and contextualized maker education.


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Your Prezi Editor, more intuitive than ever

Your Prezi Editor, more intuitive than ever | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

We’re excited to tell you about some relatively small changes that we think will have a really big impact on how easily you use the Prezi Editor. You’ll notice these changes in your online and desktop editor over the next few weeks. All the tools you know and love are still there, but we’ve moved them around a bit to better fit with how you work.


Via Baiba Svenca
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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, June 22, 11:14 AM

Prezi creators have made some changes / improvements to the tool which you will see when you start building your next presentation.

FilipeAlvesFerreira's curator insight, June 23, 3:51 AM

Producing googledepending 4G3W results

johanna krijnsen's curator insight, June 23, 4:10 AM

some changes on the Prezi editor to make it even easier to create amazing presentations

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Resize your image online - It's easy, it's free!

Resize your image online - It's easy, it's free! | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Resize your image online in three simple steps! Trouble mailing your images? Trouble putting your image online? Resize your images here; it's a free service.

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How To Convert Prezi To YouTube Videos

How To Convert Prezi To YouTube Videos | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Anyone who has used the Prezi platform would know that creating a Prezi and uploading it to Prezi.com is easy enough, however when it comes to converting it to a YouTube video, there seems to be no native method of doing so...

 

As Prezis are zooming presentations, you can neatly capture your presentation using a screen capture tool. There are many handy screencast tools for various platforms that can be used across various types of operating systems for this job. Furthermore, you can even add a voice over to narrate the Prezi presentation, as you record it. You can use many useful screencast tools for this purpose including; Camtasia Studio, Ezvid, Best Free Screen Capturer, Screenr or CamStudio.  As almost every screen capture tool provides the option to capture the proceedings from a specific window, you can launch your Prezi, position the screen capturing tool to record your Prezi’s window and begin going through each section to record the presentation. As mentioned earlier, you can also use a voice over to further enhance your presentation.


Via Baiba Svenca, PuertoTICs, juandoming, Gust MEES, Ludmila Smirnova, Juergen Wagner
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, June 26, 7:27 PM

Prezi makes wonderful slideshows. Converting them to video is explained here. 

Mary Clark's curator insight, June 27, 11:58 AM

Clear directions for converting Prezis into videos for the flipped library.  (typos in the demo Prezi, though!)

Jorge Leal's curator insight, June 28, 10:44 AM

yeah

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Evaluating the Khan Academy

Evaluating the Khan Academy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Researchers at SRI recently published the first rigorous study looking at how Khan Academy content is being used in formal educational settings as part of math instruction in the United States. Although Khan Academy originally developed as a supplemental aid in individual tutoring outside of school, it is now, in the words of SRI, "also working closely with schools to explore ways of transforming how instruction can be organized, delivered, and experienced by both students and teachers." Some of the findings from the SRI study, which was supported by the Gates Foundation, may offer important insights into potential implementation models of relevance to middle and low income country contexts -- as well as highlight where things may be a little more complicated than they may first appear. Dr. Robert Murphy, who helped lead the research team at SRI International's well-known Center for Technology in Learning that produced the Research on the Use of Khan Academy in Schools report, stopped by the World Bank earlier this week to share some related key lessons and observations.

For what it’s worth, here are five things I took away from Murphy's presentation and the subsequent Q&A session, as well as my reading of the excellent SRI study (I'll note here that these are some of *my* takeaways; I hope I have not misrepresented anything that is said in the report itself, or by Bob during his excellent talk):

 

1. What you set out to study may not always be (exactly) what you find in practice

2. What you set out to do may not always be that possible (and this isn't always such a bad thing)

3. Implementation studies, as opposed to evaluation studies, should be considered more often by those wishing to learn from educational technology initiatives

4. Even in an age of technology-enabled personalized learning, teachers still remain 'in charge'

5. No digital educational content repositories are 'comprehensive', no experience entirely immersive

 

 

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Reaching further | Learning with 'e's

Reaching further | Learning with 'e's | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

In this post, we explore the work of Jerome Bruner on scaffolding of learning. This is a simplified interpretation of the theory, so if you wish to learn more, please read the original works.

The theory

Bruner's theory of scaffolding emerged around 1976 as a part of social constructivist theory, and was particularly influenced by the work of Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky. Vygotsky argued that we learn best in a social environment, where we construct meaning through interaction with others. His Zone of Proximal Development theory, where we can learn more in the presence of a knowledgeable other person, became the template for Bruner's model.

Bruner believed that when children start to learn new concepts, they need help from teachers and other adults in the form of active support. To begin with, they are dependent on their adult support, but as they become more independent in their thinking and acquire new skills and knowledge, the support can be gradually faded. This form of structured interaction between the child and the adult is reminiscent of the scaffolding that supports the construction of a building. It is gradually dismantled as the work is completed. In a very specific way, scaffolding represents a reduction in the many choices I child might face, so that they become focused only on acquiring the skill or knowledge that is required. The simplistic elegance of Bruner's theory means that scaffolding can be applied across all sectors, for all ages and for all topics of learning.

How it can be applied to education

It is important for teachers to provide opportunities for children to constantly learn new things. Some of those may be highly complex and will require support of a very focused kind. Teachers need to be aware of the developmental state of each of the children in their care, and should provide scaffolding that is appropriate. Although this may not be possible to do on their own, teachers can improvise and provide scaffolding through other support, including the use of other adults such as teaching assistants (para-educators) parent helpers, or more knowledgeable other children within the classroom. As children gain in confidence and competence in a particular areas, teachers might place them in groups to extend each other's learning further. It's also important that teachers recognise when a child is at the point where they begin to learn independently, and decisions can be made to set them free from the scaffolding.

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I Dare You To Watch This Entire Video - YouTube

"Can you make it through the whole thing?"


Via Howard Rheingold
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Must see! ;-)

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, June 25, 5:41 PM

An infotention exercise, serious and funny at the same time, from College Humor. Can you watch it for 3 minutes without your attention fleeing?

Katie Muirhead's curator insight, August 19, 12:20 PM

I admit, I couldn't make it. Probably the best example of how our attentions bounces around!

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ThingLink for Video

Introducing an easy way to annotate videos with rich media

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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tom jackson's curator insight, July 2, 9:53 AM

adding Thinglink tags to video

Josette Williams's curator insight, July 4, 1:09 PM

An easy way to annotate videos with rich media.  Thanks Digital Delights 

KCenter SKEMA's curator insight, July 15, 11:24 AM

Voir pour les évolutions dans les supports de cours

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Brain Hacking Our Way To World Peace: New Neuroscience Says It Just Might Be Possible

Brain Hacking Our Way To World Peace: New Neuroscience Says It Just Might Be Possible | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

A couple weeks ago, I wrote a blog arguing that the social component of video games seems to be increasing empathy and somehow blocking the contagiousness of violence....

 

As lead researcher Luis Moya Albiol told Science Daily: 

 

“We all know that encouraging empathy has an inhibiting effect on violence, but this may not only be a social question but also a biological one—stimulation of these neuronal circuits in one direction reduces their activity in the other.”

 

It is also worth mentioning that this is not the first time researchers have discovered these kinds of binary relationships in the brain. In her now classic book, Animals in Translation, Colorado State University professor of animal science Temple Grandin argues that most mammals seem incapable of feeling fear and curiosity at the same time—meaning the presence of one inhibits the other.

 

Steven Kotler

 

 


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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 27, 11:17 AM

Empathy and violence are active in the same areas of the brain?   That means you increase one which reduces the other?  Intriguing implications.  -Lon  

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How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation

How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
eLearning professionals should learn more about the biological basis of learning. Check out this simple explanation.

Via Beth Dichter
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Chris Carter's curator insight, June 24, 7:35 PM

This is your brain ... this is your brain when it learns.

Betty Skeet's curator insight, September 1, 6:54 AM

We need to know more about how the brain works in the learning process so that eLearning can be more effective.

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 6, 9:14 PM

Cool

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Evaluating MOOCs - what is rally happening? Grainne Conole

Evaluating MOOCs – what is really happening? Gráinne Conole, University of Leicester 11th June 2014 EDEN conference, Zagreb 


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Book of Abstract and Collection of Synergy Synopses

2014 EDEN Annual Conference

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EDEN's curator insight, June 23, 5:11 AM

All submitted papers, projects and practices in one publication from #eden14.

 

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In the flow | Learning with 'e's

In the flow | Learning with 'e's | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

You know that moment when you are in the zone, on the ball, completely focused? You become so absorbed by what you are doing that your forget what the time is, you forget to eat, you miss sleep. That's essentially what flow is. According to Mihály Csíkszentmihályi, being in the flow is the ultimate in focused intrinsic motivation. In simplistic terms, being in the flow is where students find themselves in that narrow channel between disinterest and fear. There is a fine balance between the challenge of the task, and the skills the learner has at their disposal. Maintaining this balance avoids disillusionment if your skills don't measure up to the challenge, or boredom if the task is too simple and easy to achieve.

 

How it can be applied in education

Learners who are immersed in their studies tend to be single-mindedly motivated to explore their topic. Getting them to the place where they fall so in love with learning that little else matters is another matter entirely. One of the ways teachers can help students to focus more on their studies is to make learning so irresistible that there is seems to be no other option. Games and gamification may offer students the fine equilibrium between boredom and anxiety, as will other forms of immersive learning such as role play, simulation and problem solving. As long as the learning resource is designed to have the appropriate levels of challenge built into it, students will be interested. The graphic illustrates this clearly. P2 and P3 are positions that should be traversed quickly if students are to remain in the flow.

To be successful, challenge based learning requires achievable goals that require some incremental development of skills beyond the average, and where the challenge rises commensurately to match those skills (student progresses from P1 to P4). If the subject matter is made interesting and enjoyable enough, teachers won't have to work too hard to encourage students to actively engage. They will do so naturally, because they will want to rise to the challenge, and succeed because they see no other possible outcome.

 

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Blended Learning: Does Your LMS Make The Grade?

Blended Learning: Does Your LMS Make The Grade? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Blended learning. Integrated learning. Hybrid learning. Flipped classroom. Whatever term you prefer — the idea of mixed learning modes appeals to training practitioners. There’s good reason for enthusiasm. Educational experiences that incorporate both synchronous and asynchronous elements can be much more engaging and effective than a one-dimensional approach.

 

Can an LMS Keep Failure Out of Your Mix?

 

To avoid missteps, your technology foundation should be built from the ground up for continuous learning and performance support. The infrastructure should be robust and highly flexible, to accommodate any combination of live and on-demand elementsyou require.

How do you decide if a learning management system is “blended friendly”? Ask your vendor to answer these questions:

 

1) Are synchronous and asynchronous modes fully supported?

2) How well does it accommodate linear learning?

3) How deeply are virtual classrooms supported?

4) Are “self-service” options robust?

5) Is LMS interaction designed with a “user first” mentality?

6) How do inquiry, reflection and discovery fit in?


 

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Deeper learning | Learning with 'e's

Deeper learning | Learning with 'e's | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The theory

The history of human memory research has strongly featured differences between types of memory sch as Working Memory (previously known as Short Term Memory or STM) and Long Term Memory (LTM). Other explanations of memory have focused on the functions of various types of memory, and such approaches are often referred to as multi-store theories.

When Fergus Craik and Robert Lockhart researched human memory and recall, they argued that there was no clear difference between what others had identified as seemingly discrete memory stores, but that all memory was a result of the depth to which information was processed in the mind. Instead of referring to different stores of memory, Craik and Lockhart proposed that there are different levels of information processing. They identified at least three levels:

1. Structural level: This is a shallow layer of processing where we only pay attention to the outward appearance of a word (e.g. its morphology).
2. Phonetic level: This is a deeper level of processing where we listen to the sound of the word.
3. Semantic level: This is the deepest level of processing where we consider the meaning of the word.

Craik and Lockhart claimed that the deeper the processing, the stronger will be the trace of that memory, and thus recall will take less cognitive effort. This framework for human memory research is considered by many cognitive psychologists to be a stronger explanation than those of the multi-store memory models. Levels of processing theory certainly does seem to explain more about the human memory than the multi-store theories, although the framework has also attracted some criticism. It has also influenced other recently proposed cognitive processing theories including spreading activation theory and neural network theory.

How it can be applied to education

Teachers should be aware that children can process information in different ways and at different levels as they transform it into knowledge. Educators should think about how they can encourage students to process content in deeper and more meaningful ways. For example, students process content more deeply if they have to discuss its meaning, or are involved in solving a related problem. Educators should also give students opportunities to present their learning through seminars, or through the creation of artefacts (e.g. blogs, videos, posters) to deepen the semantic processing of their learning, thereby strengthening their memories. This is one reason why participative and active forms of learning are more powerful than direct instruction through didactive methods.

 

 

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Learn | Prezi

Learn | Prezi | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The Prezi Learn page is a library comprised of the Prezi manual, tutorials, and training prezis to help you get started.

Via Gust MEES, Juergen Wagner
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Worst practice in ICT use in education

Worst practice in ICT use in education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Here's a list of some of what I consider to be the preeminent 'worst practices' related to the large scale use of ICTs in education in developing countries, based on first hand observation over the past dozen or so years.  I have omitted names (please feel free to fill them in yourself).  The criterion I used for selection was simple: The given worst practice was easily observable in multiple prominent initiatives, with (one fears) a high likelihood of re-occurrence, in the same or other places.  In no particular order:

1. Dump hardware in schools, hope for magic to happen
2. Design for OECD learning environments, implement elsewhere
3. Think about educational content only after you have rolled out your hardware
4. Assume you can just import content from somewhere else
5. Don't monitor, don't evaluate6. Make a big bet on an unproven technology (especially one based on a  closed/proprietary standard) or single vendor, don't plan for how to avoid 'lock-in
7. Don't think about (or acknowledge) total cost of ownership/operation issues or calculations
8. Assume away equity issues
9. Don't train your teachers (nor your school headmasters, for that matter)
10. ___
[I thought I would leave #10 blank as an acknowledgement that there are many additional worst practices that merit mention, but I have run out of space. Do feel free to submit your candidates below.]

 

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Socratic Seminar

Socratic Seminar | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Socratic Seminar is a structured discussion that teaches students how to engage in discourse that is polite, respectful, focused, and academic. This speaking strategy also teaches students how to think critically about texts. The discussions that take place in a Socratic circle focus on analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating what writers say and do.

 

 

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