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Is the MOOC Revolution Over?

Is the MOOC Revolution Over? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

One of the architects of the MOOC revolution has decided that the movement should go in a different direction. In a lengthy interview with Fast Company, Sebastian Thrun, the inventor of the MOOC platform Udacity, announced that he's shelving his original goal to displace traditional higher education by delivering free online courses to millions of students worldwide. Instead, Udacity is moving towards offering credit-bearing, priced courses (likely smaller in size) that focus on technical, vocational skills.

 

In the Fast Company interview, however, Thrun highlights his disappointments with MOOCs' record: 90 percent drop-out rates with only half of the remaining 10 percent actually earning a passing grade; the student demographic overwhelmingly populated by well-educated, college-degreed professionals rather than the underprivileged students he had hoped to reach; the San Jose State University debacle, in which San Jose students taking Udacity-delivered MOOCs performed significantly worse than their peers in physical classrooms; and the unexpected failure of Thrun's interventions intended to raise passing rates. Thrun tried adding mentors and TAs to provide personalized attention and interaction with students, incorporating immediate feedback and rewards in the forms of badges and progress meters, and partnering with schools such as San Jose to provide college credit, which Thrun expected to ramp up student interest. "We were on the front pages of newspapers and magazines, and at the same time, I was realizing, we don't educate people as others wished, or as I wished," Thrun remarked. "We have a lousy product."

 

Like a good engineer-entrepreneur, Thrun isn't calling it quits. He is refocusing his efforts to develop a new MOOC niche for a different demographic. He predicts a complementary rather than rivalrous relationship between MOOCs and their classroom counterparts, as MOOCs shift towards professional development in technical fields while classrooms retain their market for most academic disciplines, most degrees, and (thus) most of the students. Besides, Udacity is evidently profitable: the article quotes one of Udacity's significant investors, who remarked, "The attitude from the beginning, about how we'd make money, was, 'We'll figure it out.' Well, we figured it out."

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Terry Elliott's comment, November 17, 2013 12:26 PM
I wish Thrun would't generalize from his 'lousy' product. There are some amazing products out there and his failure says more about his ego than it does about the MOOC ecosystem. Good riddance to bad rubbish.
Terry Elliott's comment, November 17, 2013 12:27 PM
And...follow the money from this article back to the Manhattan Institute back to...where? How does this place stay afloat?

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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The Invented History of 'The Factory Model of Education'

The Invented History of 'The Factory Model of Education' | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One of the most common ways to criticize our current system of education is to suggest that it’s based on a “factory model.” An alternative condemnation: “industrial era.” The implication is the same: schools are woefully outmoded.

As edX CEO Anant Agarwal puts it, “It is pathetic that the education system has not changed in hundreds of years.” The Clayton Christensen Institute’s Michael Horn and Meg Evan argue something similar: “a factory model for schools no longer works.” “How to Break Free of Our 19th-Century Factory-Model Education System,” advises Joel Rose, the co-founder of the New Classrooms Innovation Partners. Education Next’s Joanne Jacobs points us “Beyond the Factory Model.” “The single best idea for reforming K–12 education,” writes Forbes contributor Steve Denning, ending the “factory model of management.” “There’s Nothing Especially Educational About Factory-Style Management,” according to the American Enterprise Institute’s Rick Hess.

I’d like to add: there’s nothing especially historical about these diagnoses either.
Blame the Prussians

The “factory model of education” is invoked as shorthand for the flaws in today’s schools – flaws that can be addressed by new technologies or by new policies, depending on who’s telling the story. The “factory model” is also shorthand for the history of public education itself – the development of and change in the school system (or – purportedly – the lack thereof).
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 25, 10:56 PM

I wasn't convinced in this criticism of the label "factory system of education."  He added a lot of detail, but seemed to debunk incidentals more than the heart of what is meant by "factory system of education."  -Lon

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Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: Can You Tell The Difference? - eLearning Industry

Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: Can You Tell The Difference? - eLearning Industry | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: How To Integrate Them Into Your eLearning Course Design

Both gamification and game-based eLearning can offer your eLearning course a variety of benefits. However, it’s important to know the distinction between gamification vs game-based eLearning, so that you can choose the approach that better serves your eLearning objectives and goals, but also meets the needs of your learners. Let’s take a closer look at the basics of both gamification and game-based eLearning, in order to determine which methodology is more appropriate for your next eLearning course.

By definition, gamification involves the use of game design elements and mechanics in activities that are not inherently game-based. This is done to motivate and engage the learners, so that they can become active participants in their own learning process. In essence, the eLearning experience itself, is transformed into an educational game by using achievement badges, leaderboards, point systems, level progressions, and quests. These game elements are all integrated to help the learner achieve their learning goals and objectives.

On the other hand, while gamification utilizes game mechanics to transform the eLearning experience into a game, game-based eLearning integrates online games into the learning process to teach a specific skill or achieve a learning objective. Games are essentially used as eLearning activities to give learners the opportunity to acquire new knowledge or skills sets in a fun and engaging way. All eLearning games typically have rules and specific objectives and learners run the risk of “losing” when they participate. Another important distinction between gamification and game-based eLearning is that in a game-based eLearning strategy the content is designed to fit into the confines of the game.
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Cognitive lives scientific

Cognitive lives scientific | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The BBC Radio 4 series The Life Scientific has recently profiled three, count’em, three, cognitive scientists.

Because the BBC find the internet confusing I’m just going to link straight to the mp3s to save you scrabbling about on their site.

The most recent profile you can grab as an mp3 was artificial intelligence and open data Nigel Shadbolt.

The next mp3 for your list is an interview with cognitive neuroscientist and teenage brain researcher Sarah-Jayne Blakemore.

And finally, grab the mp3 of the programme on spatial memory researcher and recent Nobel prize winner John O’Keefe.

That’s an hour an a half of pure cognitive science. Use carefully. Keep away from fire. Remember, the value of your investments may go down as well as up
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Levels of Interactivity (and Why You’re Overcomplicating Things)

Levels of Interactivity (and Why You’re Overcomplicating Things) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
veryone knows that interactivity and engagement can make or break an eLearning program, but if you run a simple Web search on how to best approach interactivity, you’re going to hear a lot of noise. One firm will compare interactivity with the Olympic rings, while another makes a pie graph. Call it the elephant in the room: Every instructional designer is essentially coming up with a new slant on Bloom’s taxonomy.

But pretty pictures and clever metaphors can muddy the waters on something that should be simple to understand: Interactivity is on a spectrum. By understanding when to use different levels of interactivity, you can ditch all the noise and metaphors for a clearer picture of how to truly engage learners.
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LMS vs PLE

I outline the major differences between an LMS and a PLE in this 9 minute video.
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New insight into how brain makes memories

New insight into how brain makes memories | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a neighboring neuron. A team of biologists at Vanderbilt University, headed by Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Donna Webb, studies how these connections are formed at the molecular and cellular level.


The filaments that make these new connections are called dendritic spines and, in a series of experiments described in the April 17 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the researchers report that a specific signaling protein, Asef2, a member of a family of proteins that regulate cell migration and adhesion, plays a critical role in spine formation. This is significant because Asef2 has been linked to autism and the co-occurrence of alcohol dependency and depression.


"Alterations in dendritic spines are associated with many neurological and developmental disorders, such as autism, Alzheimer's disease and Down Syndrome," said Webb. "However, the formation and maintenance of spines is a very complex process that we are just beginning to understand."


Neuron cell bodies produce two kinds of long fibers that weave through the brain: dendrites and axons. Axons transmit electrochemical signals from the cell body of one neuron to the dendrites of another neuron. Dendrites receive the incoming signals and carry them to the cell body. This is the way that neurons communicate with each other.


As they wait for incoming signals, dendrites continually produce tiny flexible filaments called filopodia. These poke out from the surface of the dendrite and wave about in the region between the cells searching for axons. At the same time, biologists think that the axons secrete chemicals of an unknown nature that attract the filopodia. When one of the dendritic filaments makes contact with one of the axons, it begins to adhere and to develop into a spine. The axon and spine form the two halves of a synaptic junction. New connections like this form the basis for memory formation and storage.


The formation of spines is driven by actin, a protein that produces microfilaments and is part of the cytoskeleton. Webb and her colleagues showed that Asef2 promotes spine and synapse formation by activating another protein called Rac, which is known to regulate actin activity. They also discovered that yet another protein, spinophilin, recruits Asef2 and guides it to specific spines. "Once we figure out the mechanisms involved, then we may be able to find drugs that can restore spine formation in people who have lost it, which could give them back their ability to remember," said Webb.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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5 Incredible Free Audio Editing Tools for E-learning Developers

5 Incredible Free Audio Editing Tools for E-learning Developers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Audio plays a key role in enhancing the effectiveness of eLearning courses. It reduces the cognitive load on the learner and ensures better learning. But, how can you make sure that the audio you use in your eLearning course is first-rate? Well, efficient editing goes a long way in producing excellent audio.

There are a number of tools available in the market that can be used to edit audio. These audio editors have lot of features that can be used to apply different types of audio effects to our online courses. We can convert the audio file into different formats based on our requirements. Let us now look at a few popular audio editing tools.
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Welcome to Gamification.org - Gamification Wiki

Welcome to Gamification.org - Gamification Wiki | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

 

Gamification.org is the leading resource and community for gamification information, research and examples in over 18 languages.

 

Since creation of the Gamification Wiki in November 2010, Gamification has surged in popularity and has quickly become one of the most talked about trends. Gamification.org was created to be the ultimate resource for the emerging Gamification Industry, creating a collaborative space for those interested to come together as a community and learn and explore what works and what doesn't and to collectively benefit from the knowledge and wisdom of the community.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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5 Myths About Kids and Computers

5 Myths About Kids and Computers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When speaking to teachers and parents about teaching computer skills to their kids, there are a few things that adults tend to assume about how kids use computers. Many of these things are simply not true, at least in my experience of teaching digital storytelling, animation, and web design to middle and high schoolers. I think an English class that uses, for example, toondoo.com to create comic strip versions of stories that kids might be reading or writing in class, will go a lot smoother if the teacher is aware of what to expect and what NOT to expect from students.
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Open Education and Personal Learning - by Stephen Downes

In this presentation I outline major aspects of the learning and performance support systems (LPSS) program as it relates to open education environments. In particular I focus on understanding OERs as words, aggregating and analyzing OERs, data representation, and learner production and sharing of OERs. I conclude with a number of brief case studies of how work in LPSS supports this perspective. For audio please see http://www.downes.ca/presentation/360


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design

Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Are you planning and communicating your feedback criteria? Here is our Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design, an infographic to help you plan better assessments.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Joel Anfuso's curator insight, April 23, 4:30 PM

I have used a number of text forms of blooms but its great to see a clear graphical presentation thats easy to follow.

Barbara Macfarlan's curator insight, April 23, 5:17 PM

This is a very useful reminder for when we lose inspiration and wonder what it' serially all about.

Sandra Ciccarello's curator insight, April 23, 9:06 PM

This is perfect! Brings task creation, assessment of learning, feedback and differentiation all together in one easy to understand visual. I like it a lot.

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Moving Beyond MOOCS

Moving Beyond MOOCS | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In many ways, we have a romanticized view of college. Popular portrayals of a typical classroom show a handful of engaged students sitting attentively around a small seminar table while their Harrison Ford-like professor shares their wisdom about the...

Via Peter Mellow
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Processes, outcomes and measuring what we value.

Processes, outcomes and measuring what we value. | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
I produced this diagram as part of a paper ‘Measuring Success and Securing Accountability’ for my governors and SLT.  One reason for writing it is that, along with everyone else, we face a very turbulent period in our examination system.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Mozilla Webmaker Web Literacy Resources

Mozilla Webmaker Web Literacy Resources | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We're a global community dedicated to teaching digital skills and web literacy. We explore, tinker and create together to build a web that's open and made by everyone.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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7 Brainy Ways to Boost Knowledge Retention in eLearning

7 Brainy Ways to Boost Knowledge Retention in eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We remember the scenes and dialogs from some movies long after we have seen them. Some songs continue to haunt us even though we have not listened to them for ages. We can still recite rhymes and poems we learned when we were toddlers. Do you wonder why? Or if you are an instructional designer, have you wondered how you can create such sticky courses? How can you create courses that learners will remember easily and recall effortlessly long after they are back at their workplaces? It is challenging because forgetting is natural.

Scientists carried out a test on some subjects who had to study textbooks, retain, and recall the information. The results were startling: after a day, the subjects remembered 54 percent of what they had learned and after 21 days, they remembered a paltry 18 percent.

But are you surprised? When we were in school, most of us didn't remember what we learned in the earlier grade.

As instructional designers, you have to create courses that are easy to remember and difficult to forget.
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Assessing teachers’ digital competencies

Most every school jurisdiction I know of has come to realize that teachers need (and many lack) the skills to use the net effectively to beneath both themselves as learners and their competence as effective teachers. The problem is that many teachers (and their administrative supervisors) don’t’ know what they don’t know!

To solve this problem, Hans and his Estonian colleagues scoured the net for organizations that have attempted to list basic competencies required for effective use of digital technologies. They soon realized most competency lists focused on general and uncontextualized skills, with little direct relevance to the particular contexts faced by practicing teachers. Finally, they selected the competency model developed in 2008 by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). The model consists of five core competencies:

1. Facilitate and inspire student learning and creativity
2. Design and develop digital-age learning experiences and assessments
3. Model digital age work and learning
4. Promote and model digital-age citizenship and responsibility
5. Engaging in professional growth and leadership

For each of these 5 broad categories, they identified 5 particular competencies in increasing order of complexity. The particular competencies focused on “knowing how” to do some task, as opposed to “knowing what”. The challenging part, of course, comes when trying to identify these particular contexts in a broad enough context to be relevant to all (or nearly all) teachers, yet narrow enough to be contextually relevant. The lower level competencies were assessed using multiple choice or fill in the blanks test items (created to IMS QTI standard, of course). The higher level tasks required teachers to provide written statements, or more often links to web pages that give evidence of their competency. The Digima system then assigns these higher level items to peers for comment and assessment. At the completion of the assessment, a digital competency profile is created that gives evidence of their competencies (for self and/or administrative assessment) that can be embedded in the teachers’ own blogs or profiles, or school websites and provides direction for needed professional development.

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MOOCs and Credentialing: A Revolutionary Perspective | EdCircuit

MOOCs and Credentialing: A Revolutionary Perspective | EdCircuit | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
During the American Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress issued paper money known as Continental Currency. The notes were backed by the “anticipation” of tax revenues. However, without solid backing and since they were easy to counterfeit, the notes quickly became devalued, giving rise to the phrase “not worth a Continental.”

A number of parallels exist between the new frontier of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and their recognition as “academic currency” and the fate of the doomed Continental. Just as the revolutionary banknotes lacked credibility, the assessment instruments used by students to prove knowledge and mastery of MOOCs continue to face an uphill battle for authenticity. Until these issues are overcome, online education will be, in the eyes of many, “not be worth a Continental”.

Efforts are underway to achieve wider recognition and acceptance of alternative forms of credentialing. They are taking place in universities, community colleges and coding “boot-camps.” They generally fall into a framework known as “Competency Based Education” (CBE), representing the first significant step in the unbundling of American higher education. This trend could be compared to the introduction of iTunes, which offered consumers the option to purchase a single track instead of the entire album. Reinventing a credentialing system that has remain largely unchanged for a century is not going to happen in a semester, but cracks are beginning to appear in the ivory tower’s foundation.

One of these initiatives has recently been undertaken by the American Council on Education (ACE) the umbrella organization for higher education. It’s a pilot project in which 25 colleges joined “an alternative credit consortium” to create a more flexible pathway toward a college degree. Participants have agreed to accept transfer credits from students who complete low-cost general-education online courses, potentially benefiting more than 35 million adults who lack a degree.
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Technology Trends - Singularity Blog: Most Anticipated New Technologies for 2015/2016

Technology Trends - Singularity Blog: Most Anticipated New Technologies for 2015/2016 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Future timeline, a timeline of humanity's future, based on current trends, long-term environmental changes, advances in technology such as Moore's Law, the latest medical advances, and the evolving geopolitical landscape.

 

10TB solid state drives may soon be possibleConsumer virtual reality will grow exponentially 200GB microSD card announced by SanDisk"The Vive" – new VR headset being developed by HTC and ValveTesco becomes first UK retailer to launch a Google Glass-enabled serviceLaying the foundations for 5G mobileClothes that can monitor and transmit biomedical info3-D haptic shapes can be seen and felt in mid-airAI software can identify objects in photos and videos at near-human levelsDARPA circuit achieves speed of 1 terahertz (THz)3D printer which is 10 times faster than current modelsCreating DNA-based electrical circuitsWi-Fi up to five times faster coming in 2015Long-distance virtual telepathy is demonstratedThe Internet of Things: A Trillion Dollar MarketBrain-like supercomputer the size of a postage stampProject Adam: a new deep-learning system
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa's curator insight, April 24, 4:50 PM

Nuevas tecnologias

AugusII's curator insight, April 25, 6:15 PM

Being up to date a must -  Learning on trends useful.

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Ken Robinson: Government "Standardization" Blocks Innovative Education Reform

Ken Robinson: Government "Standardization" Blocks Innovative Education Reform | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

“I never blame teachers or schools… But there is this deadly culture of standardizing, that’s being pushed on them, politically. My core message here is that we have to personalize education, not standardize it. That all children are different, and we have to find their talents and cultivate them.” ~Ken Robinson

 

 

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Christian Jarrett: Myths and facts about the brain and learning - LT15 Conference - YouTube

The brain and the mind are hot topics right now. Unfortunately real psychology and neuroscience are frequently obscured by hype, myth and misunderstanding.


Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, April 23, 8:31 PM

A review of the facts and myths about the brain and learning by Christian Jarrett, compiler of the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest blog.

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Brain Based Learning | Stop Telling Your Students to Study

Brain Based Learning | Stop Telling Your Students to Study | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Have you ever noticed, during your own episodes of studying and learning, that it can be very easy to overestimate your knowledge or comprehension? Have you ever studied diligently for a test only to experience the dreaded “Uh-oh – I don’t know this stuff as well as I thought” moment when it came time to actually take the test? If so, you are not alone.

What you have experienced is, as some researchers call it, an Illusion of Competence. That is, when reviewing and “studying”, the ease at which we can recall, recognize, or define information leads us to a false sense of security in our knowledge. When studying is easy our confidence is high. The problem is that this confidence may be an illusion. Why might this be the case? Keep reading, it gets really interesting.

But before we dive into some of the academic research, allow me to illustrate with a real-world example. Think about a teenager you know – perhaps one who is ready to take the test to get their learner’s permit for a driver’s license. In most cases, students are provided with a manual or brochure that outlines some of the laws, topics, and information they need to know. So, they go about “studying” for the test. They read the brochure, they highlight and underline key points, and re-read the material they’ve previously highlighted. But even after all this studying, many students fail to pass the exam. Why might this be the case?

The traditional study techniques of reading, highlighting, and re-reading previously highlighted material are primarily passive. In other words, they don’t require much cognitive effort. And, as a result, those strategies can lead learners to a false sense of security. They can lead us to believe that since the content seems fairly easy at the time of the review, we’re ready to perform well on a test. Passive study techniques can lead to an illusion of depth, an illusion of comprehension, or an illusion of competence.

This all makes sense of course. There is a big difference between being able to recognize a topic or define a term when you are reviewing notes for a test and actually being able to analyze, explain, or elaborate.


So, how do we overcome this illusion? How do we go from studying to learning?

First, help your students understand that most traditional study techniques – reading, highlighting, re-reading – are limited in their effectiveness. The goal is not to study. The goal is to learn the information so that they have a depth of knowledge and understanding.

Second, require students to actively interact with the content and information in multiple ways. Reading and highlighting are OK, but they are just the very beginning strategies to build basic background knowledge. Students should be required to participate in discussions where they elaborate, explain, and reference the content. They should be required to write about their understanding in order to further clarify and expand their thinking. Students should take self-quizzes, partner quizzes, and be required to present their learning in some manner; perhaps by teaching the content to other students. All of these strategies require active retrieval and manipulation of the content. In other words, these approaches kick the brain into gear and require students to do something with their knowledge

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Reclaiming Personal Learning - by Stephen Downes

Part of a wider session called 'Education's Reality Check', this presentation highlights the need for, and structure of, personal learning, introducing participants to the Learning and Performance Support Systems project at lpss.me

 

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Promoting Academic Integrity: Are We Doing Enough?

Promoting Academic Integrity: Are We Doing Enough? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Maryellen Weimer, PhD:

 

 

'Could it be that in our efforts to prevent cheating we have failed to also promote academic integrity? Another study found that students understood they weren’t supposed to plagiarize, but they weren’t sure why. These students avoided plagiarizing so they wouldn’t get in trouble with the teacher, not because they really understood what it was or why it was a problem."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 22, 12:36 PM

 I agree that addressing personal integrity is a powerful element in the complex mix of understanding plagiarism and cheating. 


However, without information literacy (let alone fluency) students simply can't cope in the online environment.  For me the foundation is built on understanding ethical use of digital information.

Michael Westwood's curator insight, April 23, 5:40 PM

A very thoughtful article. The comments are also interesting.

Are students confronting themselves with what cheating does to them? The damage to the sense of self-worth is difficult to repair. Cheaters lie to themselves and they lie to others. By deciding to cheat, these students are telling themselves that it doesn’t matter that they haven’t learned or haven’t done the work, and that it’s OK to pretend to others that they have. And those aren’t the type of actions that make a person feel proud and accomplished. Cheating may improve a grade but the costs to personal integrity are high and far-reaching. - See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/promoting-academic-integrity-are-we-doing-enough/#sthash.AkssHLVu.dpufAre students confronting themselves with what cheating does to them? The damage to the sense of self-worth is difficult to repair. Cheaters lie to themselves and they lie to others. By deciding to cheat, these students are telling themselves that it doesn’t matter that they haven’t learned or haven’t done the work, and that it’s OK to pretend to others that they have. And those aren’t the type of actions that make a person feel proud and accomplished. - See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/promoting-academic-integrity-are-we-doing-enough/#sthash.AkssHLVu.dpufAre students confronting themselves with what cheating does to them? The damage to the sense of self-worth is difficult to repair. Cheaters lie to themselves and they lie to others. By deciding to cheat, these students are telling themselves that it doesn’t matter that they haven’t learned or haven’t done the work, and that it’s OK to pretend to others that they have. And those aren’t the type of actions that make a person feel proud and accomplished. Cheating may improve a grade but the costs to personal integrity are high and far-reaching. - See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/promoting-academic-integrity-are-we-doing-enough/#sthash.AkssHLVu.dpufAre students confronting themselves with what cheating does to them? The damage to the sense of self-worth is difficult to repair. Cheaters lie to themselves and they lie to others. By deciding to cheat, these students are telling themselves that it doesn’t matter that they haven’t learned or haven’t done the work, and that it’s OK to pretend to others that they have. And those aren’t the type of actions that make a person feel proud and accomplished. - See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/promoting-academic-integrity-are-we-doing-enough/#sthash.AkssHLVu.dpuf
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Sir Ken Robinson: Creativity Is In Everything, Especially Teaching

Sir Ken Robinson: Creativity Is In Everything, Especially Teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Creative Teaching

Let me say a few words about creativity. I’ve written a lot about this theme in other publications. Rather than test your patience here with repetition of those ideas, let me refer you to them if you have a special interest. In Out of Our Minds: Learning to Be Creative, I look in some detail at the nature of creativity and how it relates to the idea of intelligence in the arts, the sciences, and other areas of human achievement. In 1997, I was asked by the U.K. government to convene a national commission to advise on how creativity can be developed throughout the school system from ages five through eighteen. That group brought together scientists, artists, educators, and business leaders in a common mission to explain the nature and critical importance of creativity in education. Our report, All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education, set our detailed proposals for how to make this happen in practice and was addressed to people working at all levels of education, from schools to government.

It’s sometimes said that creativity cannot be defined. I think it can. Here’s my definition, based on the work of the All Our Futures group: Creativity is the process of having original ideas that have value.
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