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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 5:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 12:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 11:58 AM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 9:22 AM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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5 Easy Steps for Content Chunking in E-learning

5 Easy Steps for Content Chunking in E-learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

What is content chunking?

Content chunking is a method of presenting information by splitting it into small pieces or “chunks”. A chunk of information is one that is self-contained and can be understood without further explanation. (Source: Chunking)

Why is content chunked?

In eLearning, computer screens and other electronic devices limit the view of long documents. There is a need for concise chunks of information to deliver effective learning in precise time. Chunking is done to:

* Make reading and understanding faster and easier
* Help learners easily assimilate new information
* Help learners form mind maps and improve recall
* Give bite-sized information to learners
* Make learning easy and manageable

 

 

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Resources and Downloads for Teaching Critical Thinking

Resources and Downloads for Teaching Critical Thinking | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Educators from the Bay Area's KIPP King Collegiate High School and the KIPP network have provided these resources for you to use in your own school.
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Expert panel: what makes a good teacher

Expert panel: what makes a good teacher | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Amid debates about teacher quality and training, and with the Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group soon to report on teacher education, we asked a panel of experts just what makes a good teacher…

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 21, 3:24 PM

Although not all the "experts' used the word, relationships with students and revealing who we are as people is central to teaching. When we are in strong relationships with students, we shift the learning to them and it becomes their responsibilites in ways they enjoy.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking

249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking

Via Pedro Ramalho, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Shouldn't Education and Learning Be the Same Thing?

Shouldn't Education and Learning Be the Same Thing? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"Schooling and institutionalized education have become removed from true, instinctual, and human/humane learning.  Humans have been learning since the beginning of time with major discoveries and innovations historically and currently emerging in spite of school.  This is the biggest problem I have with schools – most are contrived and coercive and do not honor the innate human need and desire to learn, discover, and evolve."

 


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 20, 7:24 PM

In this post Jackie Gerstein states "to fully understand the purpose of school, the history of its evolution as an institution needs to be understood." After this is discussed she provides refers to an article that discusses "how to bring our schools out of the 20th century."

The next section shares quotes from a wide range of people on schooling. Three are below.

* Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school.  Albert Einstein

* Knowledge that is acquired under compulsion obtains no hold on the mind. Plato

* Education is one of the chief obstacles to intelligence and freedom of thought.  Bertrand Russell

She then looks at the messages sent out by our current school system and asks if we are questioning "What is the purpose of school?"

In fact, there are 8 questions that are raised in this post. You can find them in the image above, or you may click through to the post.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 22, 7:41 AM

Interesting post which discusses how to pull schools out of the 20th century. 

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 22, 7:49 AM

Interesting post which discusses how to pull schools out of the 20th century. 

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Is lecture really the thing that needs fixing?

Is lecture really the thing that needs fixing? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Image: Automated Blackboard eraser...

 

Based on the headline and framing of the article, you might be tempted to think that the problem is that lecture is ineffective and that data might be able to fix it. But that’s not really it. (Nor is the problem that students are stupid and lazy, which you might get from the comment section.) Actually I think Samson himself nails the problem:

He is not shy about admitting where teaching falls on the list of priorities for most of his peers: a distant third, after publishing articles and landing research grants. “Instructors want to do the right thing,” he says. “They’re just busy guys, and they don’t sense that the bean-counting is heavily weighted toward the teaching.”

In that one quote, you get everything you need to know about why traditional instructor-centered teaching still reigns supreme on many university campuses, despite mountains of evidence, not to mention anecdotes, that interactive-engagement methods are far more effective. It all boils down to that one word:Priorities.

 


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Michelle Allwright's curator insight, August 20, 2:11 PM

Interactive, engaging and the learning around core skills is where it is heading. It's about ensuring that the students are industry ready; not just theory ready.

Jim Goldsmith's curator insight, August 20, 5:18 PM

A number of good points made about priorities in higher education; also, some intelligent disussion in the comment sections from (mostly) learning peers.

Ulrike Grabe's curator insight, August 22, 2:13 AM

" If you really want something to happen, you make it a priority and make the time. I have to conclude that I think many universities, and sadly many faculty, say that they want effective teaching and high student performance, but they don’t want it badly enough to make sacrifices for it."

 

He has point there. :-)

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A letter to a new teacher

A letter to a new teacher | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Last week, in TWIOE, I noted a challenge from Stephen Hurley to pen a letter to a new teacher.  I've been mulling this around, editing/revising, and figured it was time to let it go.  Here would be...

 

Dear New Teacher:

Congratulations on starting the next stage in your life.  As an educator in the province, you have the opportunity to mold the lives and help set the direction for thousands of students over the course of your career...

 


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Bloom's 'Digital' Taxonomy - Printable Reference Table

Bloom's 'Digital' Taxonomy - Printable Reference Table | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
This overview shows the progression of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy, how each thinking skill applies in practice, and examples of activities using digital tools.

 

Since its publication in 1956, Bloom’s Taxonomy has been a foundation of most modern education systems. While the overarching principles have remained the same, changes in understanding, experience and technology have seen the Taxonomy take on a number of different forms, for a number of different purposes and applications.


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Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second

Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second

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Richard Whiteside's curator insight, February 17, 3:53 AM
Interesting. I like those three questions.
Rachel Vartanian's curator insight, March 28, 1:40 PM

EdTech is about education: student learning and outcomes. 

Jimena Acebes Sevilla's curator insight, August 18, 5:33 PM

Primero la pedagogía, después la tecnología.

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15 Twitter Hacks That Will Turn You Into a Twitter Ninja ~ buffersocial

15 Twitter Hacks That Will Turn You Into a Twitter Ninja ~ buffersocial | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

by Neil Patel

 

"Try these 15 easy Twitter hacks to get more organized and find more enjoyment sharing and engaging on Twitter."


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Jim Doyle's curator insight, August 20, 12:15 AM
15 Twitter Hacks That Will Turn You Into a Twitter Ninja ~ buffersocial
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15 Examples of Student-Centered Teaching

15 Examples of Student-Centered Teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Here are "15 examples of teacher-centered learning, and 15 examples of student-centered learning. The text is shown below, but it reads better in the graphic as you can read both side-by-side for comparison’s sake."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 17, 4:07 PM

Do you wonder what the difference is between student-centered learning and teacher-centered learning? If you do check out this post. They provide a list of 15 examples of each.

Below you will see three sets of examples. The first one is student-centered. The second one is teacher-centered.

1A. Being clear about how to do well in your class

1B. Being clear about how you will promote, measure, and celebrate understanding

2A. Handing students a rubric or scoring guide

2B. Collaborating with students to create the rubric or scoring guide

3A. Helping students master content

3B. Helping students understand what’s worth understanding

Many of the changes are small tweaks, but they will take time and effort. If one of your goals this year is to create a more student-centered learning environment you will find many ideas in this post.

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QUODL - Quality of Online & Distance Education: The Rules of e-Learning: Build with the Community of Learners in mind.

QUODL - Quality of Online & Distance Education: The Rules of e-Learning: Build with the Community of Learners in mind. | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

 This post is about investing in the social aspect of learning.

There has always been a social aspect to learning (I mean true learning, not just instruction).  I have spoken before about how apprentices as long ago as the 17th century would become journeymen and travel to see how others plied their trade, to talk, to learn, to understand and, using an old fashioned term, become rounded in their education.

With the development of ‘production-line’ teaching we lost some, if not all, of this conversational system.  ‘Keep quiet in class’, ‘Sit still’, ‘Don’t talk, it stops others concentrating’.  We have ended up with reluctant learners, ADHD, and teachers who still think this is the best way to teach (NB not learn; teach!)

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

Your course is a community, so you should nurture friendships, guide members and generally be involved; (it’s your community) – or become excluded.  The conversations you need to see will be taken elsewhere, hidden from your view and you will lose a valuable resource of feedback and quality assurance.

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Must-Watch Interview with the eLearning Manifesto Creators - eLearning Brothers

Must-Watch Interview with the eLearning Manifesto Creators - eLearning Brothers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Watch an interview with the eLearning Manifesto creators as they talk about ways to improve the state of eLearning.

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A shocking statistic about the quality of education research

A shocking statistic about the quality of education research | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A research study about research studies comes up with a cautionary finding.

 

For more than a decade, school reformers have said that education policy should be driven by “research” and “data,” but there’s a big question about how much faith anyone should have in a great deal of education research. This is so not only because the samples are too small or because some research projects are funded by specific companies looking for specific results, but because in nearly all cases, it appears that nobody can be certain their results are completely accurate.


“I would love to believe that every single person doing education research around the world has ethics that are as pure as the driven snow,” Plucker said. “[But] the law of averages tells us there’s something out there.”



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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 22, 9:27 AM

“I would love to believe that every single person doing education research around the world has ethics that are as pure as the driven snow,” Plucker said. “[But] the law of averages tells us there’s something out there.”


That is reinforcing mey thoughts and believes as I said this ALREADY years ago THAT I DON'T trust on research in EDU!


Liz Lamoreaux's curator insight, August 22, 11:49 AM

Data is significant yet can be deceptive.  We are developing human potential and there are aspects where data is not as reliable to success as we portray.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 22, 3:32 PM

The concept of replication has never made sense to me. We should be reproducing and reconstructing. Reproducing and reconstructing are not about identical. They are about checking more data against the original data collected. One can never replicate/duplicate the same situation so it is about similarities rather than exactness.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The humble question is an indispensable tool: the spade that helps us dig for truth, or the flashlight that illuminates surrounding darkness. Questioning helps us learn, explore the unknown, and adapt to change.

That makes it a most precious “app” today, in a world where everything is changing and so much is unknown. And yet, we don’t seem to value questioning as much as we should. For the most part, in our workplaces as well as our classrooms, it is the answers we reward -- while the questions are barely tolerated.

To change that is easier said than done. Working within an answers-based education system, and in a culture where questioning may be seen as a sign of weakness, teachers must go out of their way to create conditions conducive to inquiry. Here are some suggestions (based on input from question-friendly teachers, schools, programs, and organizations) on how to encourage more questioning in the classroom and hopefully, beyond it.

 

 

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Critical Thinking Pathways

Critical Thinking Pathways | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
To teach critical thinking, consider applying six definitions of that discipline to the practices of authentic inquiry, PBL, and integrated studies.

 

Critical thinking is trendy these days. With 6.3 million hits resulting from a Google search -- six times "Bloom's Taxonomy" -- its importance is undeniable. Worldwide, critical thinking (CT) is integrated into finger-painting lessons, units on Swiss immigrants, discussions of Cinderella, and the Common Core State Standards. In short, critical thinking is more beloved than Egyptian cotton.

Definitions abound. Critical thinking is:

 

* Seeing both sides of an issue." -- Daniel Willingham

* "An ability to use reason to move beyond the acquisition of facts to uncover deep meaning." -- Robert Weissberg

* "A reflective and reasonable thought process embodying depth, accuracy, and astute judgment to determine the merit of a decision, an object, or a theory." -- Huda Umar Alwehaibi

* "Self-guided, self-disciplined thinking which attempts to reason at the highest level of quality in a fair-minded way." -- Linda Elder


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Amy Burns's curator insight, August 20, 4:07 AM

Great links to dive further into critical thinking strategies. 

Charles Fischer's curator insight, August 21, 5:26 AM

Fantastic article that thoroughly explores the gauge concept of critical thinking. I loved the definition that critical thinking is "the ability to disagree with yourself." Although there are plenty of definitions out there in the world (some of them not useful at all), this seems to capture the spirit if critical thinking in a succinct way.

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How Questions Promote Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Learning Across Subject Areas

How Questions Promote Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Learning Across Subject Areas | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

In the last blog, we took a look at the perspective of perspective of Irving Sigel on the importance of asking different kinds of questions as a way of deepening students' social, emotional, and cognitive learning. Coming from a Piaget approach, Irv felt that students needed to go from understanding the material as presented to generating their own thoughts about it. He referred to this as "distancing" -- not the clearest term, but a way of saying that questions could be sequenced toward leading to students' higher order and constructivist thinking by having them take a range of perspectives about a given reading or topic.

 

 

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The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
How to use open-ended, close-ended, and a double question technique to inspire deeper thinking in your students.

 

Irving Sigel devoted his life to the importance of asking questions. He believed, correctly, that the brain responds to questions in ways that we now describe as social, emotional, and cognitive development. Questions create the challenges that make us learn.

The essence of Irv's perspective is that the way we ask questions fosters students' alternative and more complex representations of stories, events, and circumstances, and their ability to process the world in a wider range of ways, to create varying degrees of distance between themselves and the basis events in front of them, is a distinct advantage to learning.

However, Irv found that schools often do not ask the range of questions children need to grow to their potential. In this column and the next, using the story of Goldilocks and The Three Bears, we can learn from Irv about how to improve our question asking so that students learn more from text and from the world around them.

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Concept Mapping/Graphic Organizers

Concept Mapping/Graphic Organizers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"Reading Rockets shares that "A concept map is a visual organizer that can enrich students' understanding of a new concept. Using a graphic organizer, students think about the concept in several ways. Most concept map organizers engage students in answering questions such as, "What is it? What is it like? What are some examples?" Concept maps deepen understanding and comprehension."Cast reports: "There is solid evidence for the effectiveness of graphic organizers in facilitating learning." A summary of this finding is that, "When looking across 23 different studies they found a consistent effect on comprehension."

 


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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 20, 8:41 AM

Some great links in this article to a plethora of resources. 

Sample Student's curator insight, August 20, 5:15 PM

Of great use when making decisions about supporting higher order thinking in assisted learning.

Edgar Mata's curator insight, August 21, 8:57 PM

A concept map is a visual organizer that can enrich students' understanding of a new concept.

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Handbook | blendsync.org

Handbook | blendsync.org | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The Blended Synchronous Learning Handbook is the primary output of the Blended Synchronous Learning Project. It includes the summative findings of the Blended Synchronous Learning case studies, a Blended Synchronous Learning Design Framework, and a range of other resources and information to support blended synchronous learning design research and practice.


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Fiona Harvey's curator insight, August 7, 1:06 PM

looks interesting and useful to add to the research on blended learning

Jamie Ruppert's curator insight, August 7, 1:49 PM

The Blended Synchronous Learning Handbook is the primary output of the Blended Synchronous Learning Project.

HJJP's curator insight, August 20, 8:16 PM

Single source education has never been very effective, I still remember those days of pure memorization. I was fortunate enough to have relatives that always asked me about what I learned... and they were not interested in me reciting the facts, they were interested in me telling them what I thought, how it impacted my life or those of others.... When I answered them, and they were happy with my answers, I actually got to understand what I had memorized, and certainly got to master the information in a more meaningful way.... It did not always help with getting excellent grades in exams, but I still accurately remember concepts I learned in 3rd grade.... I feel blended learning is the only way of teaching.... this will allow students to understand and implement complex concepts, catapulting them into much high learning than what we experienced 50 years ago.... or 40... or 30... even 20 or in many classrooms, a couple of days ago....

 

Hope to see many teachers utilizing these sort of blended learning... Current technology makes it so much easier...

 

 

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Essay questions use of term 'pedagogy' to describe ideas with regard to college teaching

Essay questions use of term 'pedagogy' to describe ideas with regard to college teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

One note on learning styles, too: adults do tend to think they have a learning style — visual, kinesthetic, auditory — that enables them to learn more effectively. While I have read much more about andragogy than learning styles, there is some research that suggests learning styles are actually a myth. They have relevance because we give them relevance, but actually it is roughly equally possible for learning to happen visually or kinesthetically, for example, and furthermore, that ALL learners learn best when all learning styles are used. Going back to Bloom’s Taxonomy: learning that involves interactive thinking, hearing, reading, writing, touching, and creating results in the most effective learning, and naturally, much of this will requires independent learning and initiative by an adult student.

Even if we recognize that adults learn differently from children, by using the umbrella term “pedagogy” for both, we unconsciously tend to view adult learners as “children” who need to be taught by the “expert,” and we miss an entire body of knowledge and research about effectively teaching. I know some professors do not like the idea of being taught how to teach — they say it sounds too much like the training required to teach K-12. I too was somewhat like this when I first started teaching college in 2007.

But, as professors in the classroom, our ultimate goal should be for our adult students to learn, and for learning to occur, we should always be aware of how to teach effectively and stay reasonably up-to-date on findings as they develop.

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Coaching v mentoring: what works best for teachers?

Coaching v mentoring: what works best for teachers? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Teacher Andrew Jones explains the difference between coaching and mentoring, and how they suit different professional development needs

 

Coaching, on the other hand, consists of peer-to-peer discussions that provide the person being coached with objective feedback on their strengths and weaknesses in areas chosen by them. While discussion is led by the coach, they ask questions that allow the professional seeking advice to reflect on their practice and set their own goals for improvement. This is the opposite of mentoring as the coach does not evaluate, judge or set targets, and the person being coached is in full control of the discussion.

 

Unlike mentoring, coaching also gives the recipient more say on the direction of their professional development and encourages them to take more ownership of their CPD.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 


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june holley's curator insight, August 12, 4:47 AM

This is a distinction that is important for developing network leaders.

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, August 13, 7:46 AM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

Sandrine Delage (Borgé)'s curator insight, August 14, 12:06 AM

Les termes de coaching et mentoring sont souvent utilisés et je n'avais pas vraiment réfléchi à la différence des deux approches. Si elles se basent toutes deux sur des échanges informels, elles ont un périmètre et des objectifs différents très bien expliqués dans l'article.

 

Cela va m'aider dans le mentoring que j'effectue autour du digital, activité que j'ai acceptée sant trop connaître les principes.

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Why Teachers Need Personalized Professional Development

Why Teachers Need Personalized Professional Development | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Competency-based or “personalized” learning allows students to master skills at their own pace with innovative support systems and new technologies. This method saves time and money and improves learners’ retention. But students are only half of the equation.

 

===> When teachers receive personalized professional development, everybody wins. <===

 

Like their students, teachers have unique strengths and needs. And when a tool can specifically cater to those needs, it empowers teachers to flex their educational muscles.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 


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Universities focus too much on measuring activity, not quality

Universities focus too much on measuring activity, not quality | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

This meaningless pursuit of 'quality' is transforming academics into part-time administrators

 

Administrators in universities used to be people who would support academics in their role. Now it feels increasingly as if the administrative machine follows Parkinson's law, not only creating more work for themselves (under the guise of quality monitoring) but also more work for people who entered academia.

Strategic planning at every level used to be the responsibility of people who had already gained the trust and respect of their peers in teaching and/or research. Now, I see an increasing number of people who have no noteworthy research and supervision experience, who switch to administration, and are then put in charge of teaching, research and supervision committees.

The holy grail of all this administrative work is "quality". Quality monitoring, quality reporting, quality measuring, Office of Quality and so forth – this is the name of the new deity. I am afraid however, that all this paperwork suffocates its own raison d'être. All of these monitoring mechanisms are geared to measure activity, but not quality.

 


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Here Come the Data Scientists

Here Come the Data Scientists | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

A few days after the Hewlett sponsored gathering Learning with MOOCs wrapped, one word keeps buzzing through my brain: and that word is data.

This was less a MOOC workshop than a coming out party for the postsecondary learning-focused data scientists. 

Instructional designers were yesterday’s hot new member of the course development team. Today, the must-have course development team member (along with faculty and instructional designers and media specialist and librarians) is the data scientist.

And not just any data scientist.  A data scientist who is also an expert in program assessment.  A data scientist who is also a learning geek, steeped in all things Bloom and constructivist.

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

"We may be living through an inflection point in higher ed teaching and learning.  A sea change or broad transformation in postsecondary learning.  

 

This is a shift away from the model of a solo professor creating / delivering / evaluating each course to a team-based and data-centric teaching model."

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