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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Learning: It's All About the Connections

Learning: It's All About the Connections | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
I've written about connections before in It’s All About Connection. Today, though, I was thinking about all of the connections important for learning. Connection has a lot of meanings and connotati...

 

Connecting of Neural Networks in the Brain – New brain connections form in clusters during learning
Connecting of Concepts – Deep Conceptual Learning: Creating Connections That Last
Connecting with the Internet and Computer Networks -Technology Integration for the New 21st Century Learner
Connecting of Human Networks (as in PLNs – Personal Learning Networks) – Personal Learning Networks: Knowledge Sharing as Democracy
Connecting with Oneself (as with One’s Esteem, Culture, Self-Knowledge) – Cultivating the Habits of Self-Knowledge and Reflection
Social Connections: Humans Connecting Deeply and Authentically with Another – It’s All About Relationships
Connecting Objects to One Another (as in Making) – Making (in School): A Letter of Recommendation
Connecting with the Past, Present, and Future – All people are living histories

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How to Set Up Your Own Home VPN Server

How to Set Up Your Own Home VPN Server | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
VPNs are very useful, whether you’re traveling the world or just using public Wi-Fi at a coffee shop in your hometown. But you don’t necessarily have to pay for a VPN service — you could host your own VPN server at home.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Skills, Challenges, and Trends in Instructional Design Infographic

Skills, Challenges, and Trends in Instructional Design Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
To keep up with the changes in the workplace and in order for learning professionals to be competitive in the evolving global workforce, instructional design (ID) must progress as current conditions evolve, challenges become more complicated, and new trends emerge. Have ID skills changed? What other competencies are needed to be successful in the profession? The Association for Talent Development has partnered with the International Association for Continuing Education and Training and commissioned Rothwell & Associates (R&A) to conduct Skills, Challenges, and Trends in Instructional Design research. R&A President William J. Rothwell of Penn State University led this research. The Skills, Challenges, and Trends in Instructional Design Infographic presents the most important tasks for Instructional Designers and the most often used design models.


Top 5 Important Tasks for Instructional Designers

98% conduct needs assessment.
98% design a curriculum, program, or learning solution.
99% identify appropriate learning approach.
98% collaborate with stakeholders.
98% design instructional materials.

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Four Essential Elements of Student-Centered Learning

Four Essential Elements of Student-Centered Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
See, student-centered learning isn’t just one thing, it’s an entire ecosystem of techniques and outcomes. There are so many interrelated concepts that the idea, let alone the act of implementing student-centered learning can feel a little overwhelming, even frightening to many teachers. If you try to take all of this in, you might say, “What am I getting myself into?” But don’t worry: You don’t have to roll straight into student-centered learning. In fact, thinking of student-centered learning as a switch that you flip, from off to on, is the wrong approach.

Think about it this way: Our students’ learning often begins and too often ends with high-structure, teacher-directed learning. But in the world outside of school, our students need to be able to self-direct their learning in the low-structure environments that seasoned experts thrive in. If we think of student-centered learning as a path that continually gives students more choice, control, and responsibility for the learning process, we’ll see that we can adjust our teaching, our classrooms, and our students’ expectations gradually. We just need to follow a trajectory that’s aimed toward autonomy.

Student-centered learning doesn’t require that teachers radically change everything overnight, but it does require a willingness to rethink our roles, and it does require having the right tools for the job. I want to share some stories that I’ve collected from teachers and students engaged in student-centered learning.
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A social-network illusion that makes things appear more popular than they are

A social-network illusion that makes things appear more popular than they are | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

A trio of researchers at the University of California has uncovered a social-network illusion that might explain why some things become popular in cyberspace while others do not. Kristina Lerman, Xiaoran Yan and Xin-Zeng Wu have written a paper describing the illusion and how it works and have posted it on the preprint server arXiv.

 

Abstract
Social behaviors are often contagious, spreading through a population as individuals imitate the decisions and choices of others. A variety of global phenomena, from innovation adoption to the emergence of social norms and political movements, arise as a result of people following a simple local rule, such as copy what others are doing. However, individuals often lack global knowledge of the behaviors of others and must estimate them from the observations of their friends' behaviors. In some cases, the structure of the underlying social network can dramatically skew an individual's local observations, making a behavior appear far more common locally than it is globally. We trace the origins of this phenomenon, which we call "the majority illusion," to the friendship paradox in social networks. As a result of this paradox, a behavior that is globally rare may be systematically overrepresented in the local neighborhoods of many people, i.e., among their friends. Thus, the "majority illusion" may facilitate the spread of social contagions in networks and also explain why systematic biases in social perceptions, for example, of risky behavior, arise. Using synthetic and real-world networks, we explore how the "majority illusion" depends on network structure and develop a statistical model to calculate its magnitude in a network.

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Strategies for Helping Students Motivate Themselves

Strategies for Helping Students Motivate Themselves | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Consider using autonomy, competence, relatedness, and relevance as practical classroom strategies to reinforce the intrinsic motivation students need for making the most of their learning.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Sue Alexander
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Sue Alexander's curator insight, July 3, 5:35 PM
And where better than the Art Room?
Willem Kuypers's curator insight, Today, 3:32 AM

La motivation des étudiants est un  problème épineux. J'aime bien l'approche assez complet du problème.

Diana Short 's curator insight, Today, 3:38 PM

Love it. These skills, gained and practiced support nearly every social, business, or personal interaction. Yay!

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from The future of medicine and health
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How Your Brain Remembers Where You Parked The Car

How Your Brain Remembers Where You Parked The Car | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
If you run into an old friend at the train station, your brain will probably form a memory of the experience. And that memory will forever link the person you saw with the place where you saw him.

For the first time, researchers have been able to see that sort of link being created in people's brains, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Neuron. The process involves neurons in one area of the brain that change their behavior as soon as someone associates a particular person with a specific place.

"This type of study helps us understand the neural code that serves memory," says Itzhak Fried, an author of the paper and head of the Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory at UCLA. It also could help explain how diseases like Alzheimer's make it harder for people to form new memories, Fried says.

Via Wildcat2030
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Practical Guidance from MOOC Research: Student Diversity

Practical Guidance from MOOC Research: Student Diversity | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One of the signature findings of MOOC research is the tremendous diversity of MOOC learners. How can we serve them best?

Via Peter Mellow
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Cortisol Reinforces Traumatic Memories

Cortisol Reinforces Traumatic Memories | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
According to a new study, cortisol strengthens traumatic memories, both when the memory is formed and when it is reconsolidated.

 

"It had been shown that the stress hormone cortisol has a strengthening impact on the consolidation of memories, i.e. the several-hour process in the course of which a memory is formed immediately after the experience. Image is for illustrative purposes only. Image credit: Ben Mills."


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Neurones involved in everyday memories identified

Neurones involved in everyday memories identified | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

With a little help from Clint Eastwood, Jennifer Aniston and Josh Brolin -- or at least photos of them -- scientists have gained a new understanding of how memories of everyday events are formed in the brain.


Individual neurones in a region called the medial temporal lobe play a central role in swiftly forming these memories, they report in the journal Neuron.


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Are lectures a good way to learn?

Are lectures a good way to learn? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Imagine a future where university enrolment paperwork is accompanied by the statement:

 

Warning: lectures may stunt your academic performance and increase risk of failure.

 

Researchers from the United States have just published an exhaustive review and their findings support that warning. They read every available research study comparing traditional lectures with active learning in science, engineering and mathematics. Traditional lecture-based courses are correlated with significantly poorer performance in terms of failure rates and marks.

 

The study’s authors boldly compare our new awareness of the harm done by lectures to the harms of smoking. Their article – they claim – is the equivalent of the 1964 Surgeon-General’s report that led to legislated warnings about smoking in the United States. The renowned physics education researcher Eric Mazur has described continuing with lectures in the face of this new evidence as “almost unethical”.

This paper is so important because it combines 225 individual research studies through a technique called meta-analysis. So although individual studies published over the past 70 years may have occasionally found lectures to be better, we now know that the collective evidence is in support of active approaches.

 

 


Via Peter Mellow
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Indulge Your Online Learners with Gamification

Indulge Your Online Learners with Gamification | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Gamification is an interesting concept put forward by Nick Pelling in the year 2002. So what does Gamification mean? It can be defined in simple terms as the use of machines and the feel of a simple game in order to inspire positive changes in people. It helps awaken the same human instincts that generally inspire the feeling of competition in sports and other such fun activities. The general elements included are the desire for recognition, competition, status, achievement, and altruism.

A simple example of Gamification can be that of Volkswagen. A lottery radar speed camera was installed in their machines which penalized drivers who exceeded speed limits and also awarded a lottery ticket to those who respected the speed limits. The prize for the lottery was funded by the penalised drivers. This resulted in positive changes in drivers and they started to respect speed limits. When changed into a simple game, more people felt inclined to control their speeds.
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Blended and Flipped: New Models for Effective Teaching & Learning

Blended and Flipped: New Models for Effective Teaching & Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Despite their growing popularity, defining blended learning and flipped learning is more difficult than one would expect. Both models have a variety of definitions, and many consider the flipped classroom a form of blended learning. The Sloan Consortium has one of the most precise definitions, defining blended as “instruction that has between 30 and 80 percent of the course content delivered online.” For the sake of this report, we’re using a more broad definition of blended learning as a course that uses a combination of face-to-face and online learning.

The flipped classroom, sometimes called the inverted classroom, is a pedagogical model which reverses what typically occurs in class and out of class. Students are first exposed to the material outside of class, typically in the form of video-based lectures, and then class time is used to engage in activities such as problem solving, discussion, and analysis.

This special report features 12 articles curated from past issues of The Teaching Professor, Online Classroom, and Faculty Focus. With six articles dedicated to blended learning and six articles on the flipped classroom, Blended and Flipped: Exploring New Models for Effective Teaching & Learning provides an inside look at how faculty are using these approaches to reshape the college classroom. Articles include:
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Independent reviews of Teaching in a Digital Age now published | Tony Bates

Independent reviews of Teaching in a Digital Age now published | Tony Bates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
I have now received the three independent reviews I requested for my open, online textbook for faculty and instructors, called ‘Teaching in a Digital Age‘.

These are now published, alongside and as part of the book, as Appendix 4.

The process used to obtain the reviews can be seen here: The independent review process.

A review from a faculty perspective by Professor James Mitchell, of Drexel University, can be seen here.

A review from an open and distance education perspective, by Sir John Daniel, can be seen here.

A review from a digital learning perspective, by Leanora Zefi and the team at Digital Education Strategies, Ryerson University, can be seen here.

If you are doing or have done a review of Teaching in a Digital Age for an academic journal or other publication, I’d appreciate it if you could let me know, so I can link it to the book.
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5 Common Problems Of Organizational Blended Learning And How To Overcome Them

5 Common Problems Of Organizational Blended Learning And How To Overcome Them | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Technology and Innovation today open the way for corporate learning and limit classroom-only approaches. Gone are the days when training was limited by distance and cost; employees can now avail themselves of multiple learning modules to enhance their learning.

Most organizations are not, however, completely abandoning traditional modes to favor newer models such as online learning. Blended learning is often a preferred route where the best delivery methods available are utilized for a specific objective. This includes online learning, classroom-based instruction, electronic performance support, paper-based, and formalized or informal on-the-job solutions.

There is evidence that a solid blended learning design makes sense both instructionally and economically; however, there are various challenges that can sabotage learning success.
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Reading: Digging Deeper into Learners’ Experiences in MOOCs

Reading: Digging Deeper into Learners’ Experiences in MOOCs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One aspect of working on MOOCs is that there is no clear way to measure it’s success. Do you use the stats and logs that indicate clicks and time-on-page, or look at the nature of the conversations and/or comments made?

That’s why this paper loaded to Academia.edu by George Veletsianos piqued my interest – is there something in here that can help me understand the metrics we need to use in order to measure the learning and/or success of a MOOC?

“Digging Deeper into Learners’ Experiences in MOOCs: Participation in social networks outside of MOOCs, Notetaking, and contexts surrounding content consumption.”

Unsurprisingly the authors highlights the lack of literature around MOOCs that look into the metrics of MOOCs that are not captured on the MOOC platform (EdX, Coursera, FutureLearn, etc.), notably the social engagements, note-taking, and content consumption. Something I’d not considered before is the “availability of large-scale data sets appears to have shaped the research questions that are being asked about MOOCs.” It’s something I’ve wrestled with … are we asking the right questions about a course ‘success’, and do we have the right data to start with? I think not, on both counts. I would love to know more from learners on a MOOC, but the response rate on post-course surveys are typically low, typically completed by the ones who finished the course and enjoyed it. It’s the learners who signed up and didn’t visit the course, those who did visit the first step but then left, and those who dipped in and out that I really want to hear from. They have as much to say about the course, it’s content, it’s delivery, and it’s ‘merit’ as those who completed.
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Project-Based Learning: The Role of the Creative Thinking Advocate

Project-Based Learning: The Role of the Creative Thinking Advocate | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Project-Based Learning (PBL) challenges students to collaborate in a team in order to solve a real world problem independent from the teacher. It has reenergized in recent years as part of the movement toward teaching 21st Century Skills (equally referred to as the ‘soft’ skills), and has expanded to a variety of subthemes, which include Problem-Based Learning, Design-Based Learning, and more recently Apple’s Challenge-Based Learning.

Unlike traditional methods of instruction this student-centered pedagogy provides participants with an opportunity to learn from doing, as opposed to merely accumulating knowledge that is then regurgitated at the end of the semester as part of a test. In addition, with the inclusion of digital technology, students can now produce original solutions in the form of a digital media product that shares valuable information that can be used beyond the four walls of the classroom. This thinking is aligned with many of the items discussed in an article by Jonan Donaldson around Constructivism, where digital artifacts must be produced for the real world, and a real audience. This not only adds authenticity to the experience, but because the value of the product extends beyond the classroom environment, the opportunity to produce creative products that can be considered ‘Little C’ creativity, as opposed to ‘Mini C’, significantly increases as students “move from the intrapersonal creative interpretations […] to creative expression” that can be shared by others in the community.

As we begin to consider how we might cultivate creative thinking in project-based learning, it’s helpful to consider what we’re talking about. Creativity is generally considered to reference something ‘new’ and ‘useful’, and in 1961 a scholar by the name of Mel Rhodes conducted an analysis of creativity and categorized the discussion into four Ps: the creative Product, Person, Process, or Press (environment). In the learning environment it’s easy to focus our attention on the Product, which is probably the default item to evaluate, but when implementing project-based learning we must consider all four Ps as part of the learning experience. And if any one of these must receive greater attention in education, particularly in the early stages of a student’s academic career, I believe it should be the Process — the creative thinking needed in the generation of an original idea, as well as the problem-solving that occurs during its development.
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Failure Is Essential to Learning

Failure Is Essential to Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
To help these kids make the kinds of gains they need to master the Common Core, students must learn to receive feedback and also how to use it to improve.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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EDTECH@UTRGV's curator insight, July 3, 2:02 PM

I agree. We need to create an atmosphere that allows room for failure without consequences to academic success. Otherwise, students will play it safe and not try new things.

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Practical science at a distance

Practical science at a distance | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Eleanor Crabb discusses the advantages and practicalities of teaching experimental skills online

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Top 31 Best Free Cloud Storage Services for 2015 - Part 1

Top 31 Best Free Cloud Storage Services for 2015 - Part 1 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Cloud storage is great for accessing and sharing data and files with your friends, colleagues, and family members. They are great for syncing data between all your devices, and many other benefits. But free cloud storage is even better!

Yes, there are many free cloud storage services available for 2015, while they also have premium offerings that provide you extra space. But the free cloud storage offered as the starter’s package is often more than enough for many people and businesses.

The best thing about these free cloud storage services is that they offer even more free space if your refer their services to your friends or perform other promotion tasks.

With so many free cloud storage available out there, choosing the ‘right’ one for your personal as well as business use could be very difficult. However, after a thorough research, we finally came up with top 30+ free cloud storage services for 2015 to help you find the ‘right’ one easily.

 

Part 2 - http://www.mytechbits.com/top-30-best-free-cloud-storage-services-for-2015-part-two-11-20/9811805/

 

Part 3 - http://www.mytechbits.com/top-31-best-free-cloud-storage-services-for-2015-part-3/9811842/

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This Is The Future Of College

This Is The Future Of College | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One dominant fear among academics is that online education will completely replace the physical campus and the professor. This is unlikely, at least in the short term. Students still see value in being exposed to new people and new ideas, and creating a network of valuable connections. But they won’t attend for four years. Introductory 101 courses can be covered quickly (and affordably) by massive open online classes (MOOCs) or bootcamps.

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Long-Term Memories Are Maintained by Prion-Like Proteins

Long-Term Memories Are Maintained by Prion-Like Proteins | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Research from Eric Kandel’s lab has uncovered further evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time.

 

"Memories are stored for the long-term with the help of prion-like proteins called CPEB. CPEB prions aggregate and maintain synapses that recorded the memory [“spines” in the bottom image]. When CPEB prions are not present or are inactivated, the synapses collapse and the memory fades [see upper image]."


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Will the University of Adelaide's lecture phase-out be a flop?

Will the University of Adelaide's lecture phase-out be a flop? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The University of Adelaide is planning to completely phase out lectures. Is this change good for learning?

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U of Phoenix: Losing hundreds of millions of dollars on adaptive-learning LMS bet -

U of Phoenix: Losing hundreds of millions of dollars on adaptive-learning LMS bet - | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
It would be interesting to read (or write) a post mortem on this project some day.

Two and a half years ago I wrote a post describing the University of Phoenix investment of a billion dollars on new IT infrastructure, including hundreds of millions of dollars spent on a new, adaptive-learning LMS. In another post I described a ridiculous patent awarded to Apollo Group, parent company of U of Phoenix, that claimed ownership of adaptive activity streams. Beyond the patent, Apollo Group also purchased Carnegie Learning for $75 million as part of this effort.

And that’s all going away, as described by this morning’s Chronicle article on the company planning to go down to just 150,000 students (from a high of 460,000 several years ago).

And after spending years and untold millions on developing its own digital course platform that it said would revolutionize online learning, Mr. Cappelli said the university would drop its proprietary learning systems in favor of commercially available products. Many Apollo watchers had long expected that it would try to license its system to other colleges, but that never came to pass.
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Personal Learning Graphs (PLeG)

Personal Learning Graphs (PLeG) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Personalized and adaptive learning has been described as the so-called holy grail of education. The idea is not new, though its technological instantiation is getting increased attention. In a well-funded education system, personalized instruction happens when guided by a teacher as each students strengths and weaknesses and knowledge gaps are known. However, when classrooms start to exceed 20+ students, some type of mediating agent is needed in order to address knowledge gaps as it becomes impossible for a teacher to be aware of what is happening with each learner. So, while the human educator is the original (and best) personalized learning system, the current funding constraints and other resource challenges have raised the need for alternative approaches to make sure that each learner is receiving support reflective of her needs.

Many of the personalized learning systems now available begin with an articulation of the knowledge space – i.e. what the learner needs to know. What the learner knows is somewhat peripheral and is only a focal point after the learner has started interacting with content. Additionally, the data that is built around learner profiles is owned by either the educational institution or the software company. This isn’t a good idea. Learners should own the representation of what they know.

Last year, I posted on personalized learner knowledge graphs. Since then, I’ve been working with several colleagues to refine and develop this idea. Embedded below is a summary of our recent thinking on what this would look like in practice. Personal Learning Graph (PLeG – pronounced ‘pledge’ (acronyms are hard)) is intended as a response to how work and life are changing due to technology and the importance of individuals owning their own learning representation.
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