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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from 21st Century Concepts-Technology in the Classroom
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Five Essential Tech Tools to Keep Teachers Learning

Five Essential Tech Tools to Keep Teachers Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

“Tech-using teachers must not only harvest the ideas of others but curate what's valuable & create opportunities to learn. Curtis Chandler shares 5 digital tools”


Via Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D., juandoming, Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, April 17, 8:46 PM
Suggestions for using tech tools more effectively to further your own learning.
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Link Between Family Income, Academic Achievement and Cortical Thickness Discovered

Link Between Family Income, Academic Achievement and Cortical Thickness Discovered | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A new study led by researchers at MIT and Harvard University offers another dimension to this so-called “achievement gap”: After imaging the brains of high- and low-income students, they found that the higher-income students had thicker brain cortex in areas associated with visual perception and knowledge accumulation. Furthermore, these differences also correlated with one measure of academic achievement — performance on standardized tests.

“Just as you would expect, there’s a real cost to not living in a supportive environment. We can see it not only in test scores, in educational attainment, but within the brains of these children,” says MIT’s John Gabrieli, the Grover M. Hermann Professor in Health Sciences and Technology, professor of brain and cognitive sciences, and one of the study’s authors. “To me, it’s a call to action. You want to boost the opportunities for those for whom it doesn’t come easily in their environment.”
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Fluent Mind Map- Create Beautiful Mind Maps on Your iPad

Fluent Mind Map- Create Beautiful Mind Maps on Your iPad | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Fluent Mind Map is an excellent iPad app that you can use to easily map your thoughts and generate and organize your ideas into an elegant mind map. Fluent Mind Map provides you with easy to use editor where you can add nodes, change text, make colourful nodes, zoom in and out, and many more.

 

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/fluent-mind-map/id645539191?mt=8

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Scientists use brain stimulation to boost creativity, set stage to treat depression - PsyPost

Scientists use brain stimulation to boost creativity, set stage to treat depression - PsyPost | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A UNC School of Medicine study has provided the first direct evidence that a low dose of electric current can enhance a specific brain pattern to boost creativity by an average of 7.4 percent in healthy adults, according to a common, well-validated test of creativity.

This research, published in the journal Cortex, showed that using a 10-Hertz current run through electrodes attached to the scalp enhanced the brain’s natural alpha wave oscillations – prominent rhythmic patterns that can be seen on an electroencephalogram, or EEG.

“This study is a proof-of-concept,” said senior author Flavio Frohlich, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry, cell biology and physiology, biomedical engineering, and neurology. “We’ve provided the first evidence that specifically enhancing alpha oscillations is a causal trigger of a specific and complex behavior – in this case, creativity.
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The European MOOCs Scoreboard Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

The European MOOCs Scoreboard Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The world of MOOCs is dynamic and growing, and Open Education Europa aims to be the leading online resource for open education innovation. The aim of the European MOOCs Scoreboard Infographic is to highlight the huge potential that European institutions have in the world of OER and to help visualize this potential by compiling the existing European-provided MOOCs available on different open websites.

European MOOCs are those provided by European institutions, regardless of the platform that hosts them. All of the MOOCs accounted for in the scoreboard are also listed in the MOOC aggregator on the Open Education Europa website.

Another crucial point to note is that the scoreboard data is cumulative. That is, MOOCs are not deleted once they’re over. If a course is offered more than once, any subsequent session will be added as a new entry, i.e. Basic Economics (2nd Edition).

The courses have varying statuses: some are starting soon, some are ongoing, and others are listed as finished, but have made their resources available for self-study. While most of the information concerns MOOCs from European institutions, additional research on non-EU MOOCs was conducted to provide a reliable basis for comparison.

The scoreboard data is downloadable from the scoreboard page by clicking on the export symbol on the bottom of each of the scoreboard tabs.
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Pedagogical Knowledge: Three Worlds Apart

Pedagogical Knowledge: Three Worlds Apart | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We know a lot about teaching and learning, but our knowledge is scattered across three separate domains.
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Playbook for a Successful Presentation: The 8 Basic Components of Every Great Speech

Get the bonus at http://preshero.co/magic Playbook for a Successful Presentation: the 8 Basic Components of Every Great Speech Give me 5 minutes and I will giv…

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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, April 16, 3:06 PM

Look through this magic playbook with 119 pages of great tips for presenting in public. It's worth studying with students.


Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Eclectic Technology
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8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions

8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"Questions can be extraordinary learning tools.

A good question can open minds, shift paradigms, and force the uncomfortable but transformational cognitive dissonance that can help create thinkers. In education, we tend to value a student’s ability to answer our questions. But what might be more important is their ability to ask their own great questions–and more critically, their willingness to do so."

 

1. TeachThought Learning Taxonomy

2. Socratic Discussion

3. Paideia Seminar

4. The Question Game

5. The Question Game

6. Bloom’s Taxonomy

7. Question Formation Technique

8. Universal Question Stems


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 15, 11:05 PM

How do you teach your learners to ask good questions? This post shares many resources to help you learn new skills that will assist you in teaching others.

The post begins with a visual, the Teach Thought Learning Taxonomy, which is a template for critical thinking that looks at cognition across six categories. This is described in depth.

Additional tools shared include:

* Socratic Discussion which includes a video from Tch (the Teaching Channel)

* Paideia Seminar - "an integrated literacy event built around formal whole class dialogue. The purpose for doing Paideia Seminar is to support students’ ability to think conceptually and communicate collaboratively." There is also a video.

* The Question Game (which was shared previously on this Scoop.it)

* Bloom's Taxonomy

* Question Formation Technique - See the visual at the top, or check out their website at The Right Question Institute. If this is of interest to you they are presenting a workshop in Boston in July. Information on this is available at their website.

* Universal Question Stems and Basic Question Stem Examples

This is actually part 2 of a two part post. The first post is A Guide to Questioning in the Classroom.

Mike Clare's curator insight, April 16, 5:16 PM

Great starting point.  

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, April 17, 7:31 AM

SOME TIMES KNOWING THE RIGHT QUESTION TO ASK WILL GET THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR THE PROBLEM YOU ARE TRYING TO SOLVE!!  IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT TO ASK YOU MAY NOT GET THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR YEARS BUT THE ANSWER TO THE QUESTION THAT WAS ASKED!?!

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Keeping up with Ed Tech
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The Benefits of Adaptive Learning Technology

The Benefits of Adaptive Learning Technology | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Adaptive learning has long been a part of education. The basic concept is simple: Coursework should be adapted to meet the individual needs of each student.

Via EDTC@UTB, WebTeachers
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Welcome to The Debunker Club! - The Debunker Club

Welcome to The Debunker Club! - The Debunker Club | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

This website is dedicated to the proposition that all information is not created equal. Much of it is endowed by its creators with certain undeniable wrongs. Misinformation is dangerous!!

There's a lot of crap floating around the learning field. Much of it gets passed around by well-meaning folks, but it is harmful regardless of the purity of the conveyer.

People who attempt to debunk myths, mistakes, and misinformation are often tireless in their efforts. They are also too often helpless against the avalanche of information.

The Debunker Club is an experiment in professional responsibility. Anyone who's interested may join as long as they agree to the following:

1. I would like to see less misinformation in the learning field.
2. I will invest some of my time in learning and seeking the truth, from sources like peer-reviewed scientific research or translations of that research.
3. I will politely, but actively, provide feedback to those who transmit misinformation.
4. At least once a year, I will seek out providers of misinformation and provide them with polite feedback, asking them to stop transmitting their misinformation.
5. I will be open to counter feedback, listening to understand opposing viewpoints. I will provide counter-evidence and argument when warranted.

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▶ The DelftX MOOC Experiences - YouTube

Experiences and lessons learned from developing, building and running 18 MOOCs (including 4 reruns) at the Delft University of Technology, namely the selecti...

Via Peter Mellow
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Clive on Learning: Clive's Cone (if Dale can have one so can I)

Clive on Learning: Clive's Cone (if Dale can have one so can I) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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New Information Absorbed Best After A Good Night’s Sleep

New Information Absorbed Best After A Good Night’s Sleep | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Academics from the Department of Psychology at Royal Holloway taught a group of people new words from a fictional language, which unknown to them, was characterised by a rule relating the new words to one another. They found that although learners became aware of the rule within the new language shortly after being taught it, they were unable to apply it to understanding new, untrained words until after a period of rest.

Kathy Rastle, Professor of Cognitive Psychology at Royal Holloway, said: “Teachers have long suspected that proper rest is critical for successful learning. Our research provides some experimental support for this notion. Participants in our experiments were able to identify the hidden rule shortly after learning. However, it was not until they were tested a week after training that participants were able to use that rule to understand a totally new word from the fictional language when it was presented in a sentence.”

She added: “This result shows that the key processes that underpin long-term learning of general knowledge arise outside of the classroom, sometime after learning, and may be associated with brain processes that arise during sleep.”

The research, published in the journal Cognitive Psychology also found that participants needed time to consolidate this rule-based knowledge before being introduced to new words that did not follow the rule. If the exceptions were introduced during the initial vocabulary learning session, learners were unable to develop an understanding of the general rule.
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A new professor's advice on whether (and how) to teach a MOOC | InsideHigherEd

A new professor's advice on whether (and how) to teach a MOOC | InsideHigherEd | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

That is the question. Except it wasn’t really a question for me. I decided to teach a MOOC even before I taught my first college course. My friend Frank Wang (then an undergraduate at Stanford) had helped Dan Boneh teach his cryptography course through Coursera. His stories made the intellectual challenge of teaching a MOOC sound exciting.

 

I was also inspired by a Clayton Christensen video about disruption in higher education. Christensen argued that when an innovation makes a complicated and expensive product simpler, it can quickly destabilize even large, well-established institutions. Higher education, he argued, is one such institution. Costs have spiraled to such an extent that the advent of any new, lower-cost delivery mode is likely to spark rapid, dramatic change. Some of my colleagues view these changes in a negative light, but I believe they will make universities more powerful and relevant.

 

Finally, I’m an engineer, so I’m fascinated by scale. How do you take a scarce resource, like high-quality education, and provide it to more people across a larger geographical area without diluting the quality? This seemed like an interesting and worthwhile problem to solve.


Via Peter Mellow
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5 Features Every LMS Should Have

5 Features Every LMS Should Have | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Ask any educator or administrator, and they will tell you their LMS needs better reporting, viewing on Mobile, and integrated e-commerce. Take a look at this infographic for the top 5 features every LMS should have.
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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: critical thinking

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: critical thinking | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education
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The Content or the LMS? Which Comes First?

The Content or the LMS? Which Comes First? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

You need both. Without content the LMS is an empty cookie jar. It’s pretty looking but frustrating every time you open it. Then again, content without an intuitive platform for delivery is a treasure hunt, often without a treasure map to guide you.

But wait, don’t order yet, there’s more.

Before EITHER the content or LMS is considered, it is important to step back and think:

1. Who am I providing this content for and why do they need it?
2. What can I offer that is both relevant and unique?

If you cannot answer either of those questions, then neither content NOR an LMS will help you provide successful educational material. Once you have a clear direction, understanding what type of content will be most relevant will help you select an LMS. What will resonate with your audience and how will they consume it? Will they have blocks of time at their computer or will they be getting the information in snippets on their mobile devices? Knowing what the content should look like narrows the requirements so it’s easier to find the best LMS for delivering that material. It doesn’t necessarily need to be all written out before LMS consideration begins, but it is helpful to have a vision for the final content types and formats.

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Disrupting Higher Education -- Campus Technology

Disrupting Higher Education -- Campus Technology | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
True disruptive innovations can be identified by six shared characteristics that might at first seem counterintuitive, Weise said:

1. They target people who are non-consumers or who are over-served by existing products.

2. The innovation is not as good as existing products, as judged by historical measures of performance.

3. They're simpler to use, more convenient or affordable.

4. There is a technology enabler that can carry the new value proposition upmarket.

5. The technology is paired with a business model innovation that allows it to be sustainable.

6. Existing providers are motivated to ignore the new innovation and are not threatened at the outset.

Weise pointed to an example in higher education that checks all of these boxes: the for-profit University of Phoenix.

"People sometimes get upset when I say this," she said. "They say, that makes no sense, because they deliver a product that I find inferior, or that doesn't apply to students who attend my institution. If you're thinking that this product is not good, ask yourself, is it maybe just good enough for a whole new population of students? The University of Phoenix and places like Devry were able to deliver a higher education product and service that maybe looks different in terms of the basis of performance that we use to think about [traditional] institutions.... But consider it from the perspective of students who were working adults, who didn't want to give up their jobs to pursue their degrees. They were even willing to pay a high premium to attend the University of Phoenix because they offered that online option, so they could continue to work and get their degree at the same time. It enabled a whole new population of people to pursue their degrees."
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Pedagogy, Critical Pedagogy, Hybrid Pedagogy, #digped
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LibGuides: Pedagogy to Oppress?

LibGuides: Pedagogy to Oppress? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

You have to be a pretty tenacious researcher to find any criticism about LibGuides, the practical and convenient tool that librarians use to create online guides to research. My search for “LibGuides and critique or criticism” taught me a great deal about how to interpret literature, while keying in “LibGuides and problems” merely returned information about the occasional scheduled downtime. It was not until I limited my search to wordpress.com and then traced a bunch of links and pingbacks that I could even start to gather a sense of the conversation round the topic. Yet, ironically, it is exactly this twisting, infuriating and (occasionally) joyful process of research that is stifled by the way that most librarians structure and organize their LibGuides. Web-based research guides have helped to bridge the gap that the growth of online resources has put between the library and its patrons. However, their typical focus on librarian-defined notions of value and authority conceals an industrial-era adherence to library-centric, behaviourist learning theories and provides a textbook example of Paulo Freire’s banking model of education. In short, while librarians have started to think about the nature of critical pedagogy in the classroom, a failure to subject instructional materials to the same processes of reflective, critical thinking serves to dehumanize both our students and the nature of research and inquiry.


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Teaching Online: Essential Elements for Faculty

Teaching Online: Essential Elements for Faculty | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The world of higher education has seen a massive shift over the past few years towards the realm of online education.

Adults are returning to school online, high school graduates are pursuing tech degrees, and major institutions are beginning to offer courses based outside of the established classroom. As a modern educator in today’s rapidly evolving technological world, it is imperative to stay current with the possibilities of online education.

If creating and implementing online curriculum seems daunting, learning a few basic skills will make developing an online course easier than it seems.

With the goal of supporting educators through the dynamic and fast-growing online teaching medium, Magna Publications offers a comprehensive online course titled Teaching Online: Essential Elements for Faculty.

Developed by Dr. John Orlando, long-time online teacher and program director, this online course answers faculty questions while providing insight on how to become an exceptional online educator.
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How to Foster Critical Thinking Skills—Fast!

How to Foster Critical Thinking Skills—Fast! | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Here are some tips for getting your students on the fast track to fostering critical thinking skills in the classroom.

Via Yashy Tohsaku, reuvenwerber, Charles Fischer
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ruthschapira's curator insight, April 13, 5:31 PM

Helpful prompts to begin the thought process are included in this brief but succinct article.

Charles Fischer's curator insight, April 15, 7:44 AM

A nice article with some important principles for Socratic seminar. One of them, "Avoid doing all the work for them," is a key component to any seminar experience. This often takes the form of "gradual release of responsibility," since students need to be taught skills first before they get a chance to practice.

Anthippi Harou's curator insight, April 16, 3:37 PM
An interesting article on how to develop our students' critical thinking skills.
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Exploding Classrooms

Exploding Classrooms | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The ideas within Connectivism blow my mind in many good ways. I hear the words of U2’s “Where the Streets Have No Name”–I want to tear down the walls that hold me inside. I want to reach out and touch the flame.

Beginning with Siemens 2004 explanation these ideas seriously shake up traditional notions of classrooms and teachers:

Principles of Connectivism:

- Learning and knowledge rests in diversity of opinions.
- Learning is a process of connecting specialized nodes or information sources.
- Learning may reside in non-human appliances.
- Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known
- Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning.
- Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill.
- Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.
- Decision-making is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision.

I love the idea that the learner must be the central agent in learning, that education happens always and everywhere, that learners need to make and maintain connections, and that learners need to make sense of constantly flowing streams of information.

And when I look at the slide below produced by Rick Schwier, it essentially shows my entire educational career from a student starting grade 1 in 1975 up to my teaching today. It delineates the process in which I have learned and tried to help others learn during massive changes in availability and production of information. So the question I (and all teachers) should be asking ourselves is how the “Social software + free and open content” in the most recent iteration bubble impacts the way education is happening under our guidance.

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Helen Teague's curator insight, April 15, 9:05 AM

Principles of Connectivism:
- Learning and knowledge rests in diversity of opinions.
- Learning is a process of connecting specialized nodes or information sources.
- Learning may reside in non-human appliances.
- Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known
- Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning.
- Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill.
- Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.
- Decision-making is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision.

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Survival Tips for Teaching with Technology

Survival Tips for Teaching with Technology | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Learn how to use technology as a tool for education, and succeed as a teacher.
Open Presentation – Survival Tips for Teaching with Technology

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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How ‘Elite’ Universities Are Using Online Education

How ‘Elite’ Universities Are Using Online Education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

After years of skepticism, higher education’s upper class has finally decided that online learning is going to play an important role in its future. But what will that role be?

 

Recently, conversations about "elite" online education have revolved around the free online courses, aka MOOCs, which Stanford, MIT, Harvard, and dozens of other top universities started offering several years ago. But it soon became clear that high marks in those courses would not translate to academic credit at the institutions offering them (or anywhere else).

 

So how exactly does online education figure into the future of elite higher education? Judging by what we’ve seen so far, the answer can be divided into three parts.

 

 


Via Peter Mellow
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elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, April 15, 2:54 AM

Always interesting to see how top universities manage Technologies in their education plan

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Special Collection: "Distance learning, openness and educational technology"

Special Collection: "Distance learning, openness and educational technology" | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Journal of Interactive Media in Education - open journal, peer reviewed

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Gary Bamford's curator insight, April 15, 1:40 AM

Open your mind .....