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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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E-Learning Design - Part 4 - Learning through Collaboration

E-Learning Design - Part 4 - Learning through Collaboration | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What is Social Constructivism?

As learning theories, constructivism and social constructivism have much in common. In fact, as we alluded to above, some educators see them as being one and the same. However, the difference between the two is that social constructivism places an emphasis on the collaborative nature of learning, highlighting the importance of cultural and social influences.

Social Constructivism - Learning through collaboration

Initially developed by a cognitivist named Lev Vygotsky, social constructivism sees learning as being an ‘active process’ (that is, more than just the passive absorption of new information) in which a person’s interactions with others (including peers, family, and – in a formal context – teachers or trainers) have a significant impact on their learning. These interactions – along with the influence of the learner’s cultural and social environments – shape the way that the learner’s knowledge and understanding is constructed.
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E-Learning Design - Part 2 - Observable and Measurable Outcomes

E-Learning Design - Part 2 - Observable and Measurable Outcomes | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What are Observable and Measurable Outcomes?

The use of observable and measurable outcomes in learning is linked to something called ‘Bloom’s Taxonomy’. Between 1949 and 1953, a committee of educators – chaired by Benjamin Bloom – met for a series of conferences designed to improve curricula and examinations. As a result of these conferences, the committee came up with a taxonomy that classified skills from least complex to most complex.

Since the taxonomy’s first volume (Handbook I: Cognitive) was published in 1956, Bloom’s name has been synonymous with lesson planning for teachers across the world. In Handbook I, Bloom and his committee identified a number of cognitive levels at which humans can function. These range from the basic function of understanding and recalling new information, to the more complex function of evaluating new information and connecting it with other knowledge.
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Analytics programs show 'remarkable' results — and it's only the beginning

Analytics programs show 'remarkable' results — and it's only the beginning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Strong students who go to weak high schools enter college less prepared to succeed than their peers who are less talented academically but attend high-performing high schools.

“They seem to be at an unusual disadvantage,” said Gerry McCartney, system chief information officer and vice president for information technology at Purdue University. Purdue’s Course Signals program has given students, faculty, and administrators more information about student performance since it was piloted during the 2006-07 academic year. Aggregating all of the data from these students and their predecessors creates a useful roadmap showing which course and study strategies work.

McCartney calls Signals a fairly rudimentary product that is already showing remarkable results with traditionally at-risk students and others. It’s not predictive — it simply flags indicators that have contributed to a student’s failure in the past, giving current students the benefit of an early warning.
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How I am learning to give up control and trust my students

How I am learning to give up control and trust my students | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
This summer I was in the AVID Summer Institute and I raved on this blog about the awesomeness that is Socratic Seminar.
Well, our first week back to school isn’t yet done, and my Modern American History classes have each already done their first.

Via Dean J. Fusto
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning with MOOCs
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The maturing of MOOCs

The maturing of MOOCs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Through networks such as edX, the education platform co-founded by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), MOOCs (massive open online courses) are now mainstream, and a lot of learning has gone digital.

Whether directly (purely online) or in a hybrid fashion (a residential course that uses a learning-management system to do basic administrative work or more sophisticated tasks such as assessments or discussion boards), faculty and learners are working in a new kind of classroom.

But the field is young, and the next-gen classroom often doubles as a laboratory. With millions of global learners and teachers taking advantage of a vast array of free or low-cost online courses, researchers are studying the resulting information trail, from mouse clicks to discussion posts, to understand what, how, and even whether students are learning.

Andrew Ho, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and chair of the HarvardX research committee, and Isaac Chuang, MIT professor of physics, professor of electrical engineering, and senior associate dean of digital learning, have been at the forefront of this interdisciplinary field, having co-authored several benchmark research studies on MOOC learners. For the start of the academic year, they submitted answers to questions in tandem about the opportunities and challenges in the science of learning.


Via Peter Mellow
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99% Invisible: A Holistic Approach to Learning Space Design

99% Invisible: A Holistic Approach to Learning Space Design | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In one of my favorite quotes from The Medium is the Message, Marshall McLuhan wrote, “The serious artist is the only person able to encounter technology with impunity, just because he is an expert aware of the changes in sense perception.”

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Harvard, MIT researchers find MOOC learners using multiple accounts to cheat | InsideHigherEd

Harvard, MIT researchers find MOOC learners using multiple accounts to cheat | InsideHigherEd | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Researchers at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have discovered a new form of cheating in massive open online courses that they say poses a “serious threat to the trustworthiness of MOOC certification.”


Via Christelle Bozelle
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Making a mistake can be rewarding, study finds: MRI study shows failure is a rewarding experience when the brain has a chance to learn from its mistakes

Making a mistake can be rewarding, study finds: MRI study shows failure is a rewarding experience when the brain has a chance to learn from its mistakes | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The human brain learns two ways - either through avoidance learning, which trains the brain to avoid committing a mistake, or through reward-based learning, a reinforcing process that occurs when someone gets the right answer. Scientists have found that making a mistake can feel rewarding, though, if the brain is given the opportunity to learn from its mistakes and assess its options.

Via Adrian Bertolini, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, August 27, 7:51 PM

Interesting study!

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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Robots Will Steal Our Jobs, But They’ll Give Us New Ones

Robots Will Steal Our Jobs, But They’ll Give Us New Ones | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The robots might take our jobs. But they'll also create new ones.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 28, 3:23 PM

In fact, robotics has already changed factory work, medical technology, and more. Robotics has already changed job requirements and expectations.

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The ‘flipped classroom’ is professional suicide

The ‘flipped classroom’ is professional suicide | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Historian Rachel Hope Cleaves recently identified a recurring meme in the history of food advertising: pigs slaughtering themselves. She first tweeted an image of pig leaping into a meat grinder. Others followed with different examples of suicide, some not requiring machines. Over and again, our porcine friends happily sacrifice themselves for our gustatory delectation. The irony of these pictures, if you know anything about pigs, is that they are among the smartest animals in the animal kingdom, and therefore unlikely to carve themselves up to be served on a platter. Yet there they are, happily chopping away.

This may explain why that discussion makes me think of college professors.
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Adapting courses for the digital era: the professors' perspective

Adapting courses for the digital era: the professors' perspective | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
“What I would like to emphasize is that some people see online education as competing with traditional education,” he said. “And I see them as complements.”

Via Peter Mellow
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, August 27, 11:14 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning and Teaching in an Online Environment
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Australian University Eyes Use of Badging for Credit

Australian University Eyes Use of Badging for Credit | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
An Australian university with an international online student body expects to begin accepting digital badging in 2016 that could reduce the amount of time required for people to obtain their master's degrees in IT.

Via Peter Mellow
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E-Learning Design - Part 5 - Learning through Creating (Blooms 21)

E-Learning Design - Part 5 - Learning through Creating (Blooms 21) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

What is Blooms 21?

Conceived between 1949 and 1953 by a committee of educators, the original Bloom’s taxonomy identified a number of cognitive levels at which humans can function. These levels range from the basic function of understanding and recalling new information, to the more complex function of evaluating new information and connecting it with other knowledge. They are commonly displayed as a step pyramid, with the lower-level functions located at the bottom.

The step-pyramid structure is often interpreted as suggesting that the higher-level functions can only be reached if the levels below them have been achieved, and that not all learners will be able to reach the top level. Some educators strongly disagree with this structure, most notably Shelley Wright of the Buck Institute for Education (BIE):

“The presentation of the taxonomy as a pyramid suggests that one cannot effectively begin to address higher levels of thinking until those below them have been thoroughly addressed. Consequently, Blooms becomes a ‘step pyramid’ that one must arduously try to climb with your learners. Only the most academically adept are likely to reach the pinnacle.”

5-2-aThough this taxonomy of the cognitive domain was revised by Anderson and Krathwohl in 2001, the visual metaphor of the step pyramid was still prevalent. In 2012, Wright suggested that the revised taxonomy should be flipped on its head, so that learners begin with an introduction to a subject through creating, rather than being bombarded with facts they need to remember.

Blooms 21

We would suggest that this flipped taxonomy, also referred to as ‘Blooms 21′, is more in keeping with a constructivist approach to learning due to its emphasis on learner contribution to the building of knowledge.

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E-Learning design - Part 3 - Constructivism: The Learner as an Active Participant

E-Learning design - Part 3 - Constructivism: The Learner as an Active Participant | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

What Does It Mean to Be an Active Participant in Learning?

When we encounter something new, we process it by measuring it against our existing ideas and experiences. When we meet a dog in the street, for example, we very quickly recognise it as belonging to the class of objects that we identify as ‘animals’, and then further classify it as being a ‘dog’.

Constructivists believe that this is how we learn, by being an active participant in the learning process, and constructing our own understanding and knowledge of the subject matter through experience and reflection.

For something as simple as adding a new breed of dog to an existing class of objects, all we need to do is to tap into our existing understanding of the concept of ‘dogs’. For most people, the association between an object (the dog) and such a simple concept (‘dogs’) happens within milliseconds – but constructivists believe that the same process of using experience to construct meaning applies to all concepts, even though some more difficult concepts may take longer for the learner to evaluate and assess.

However, although constructivism places an emphasis on learner autonomy, this doesn’t mean that learners should be simply left to their own devices. The theory also identifies the need for support in learning, something which is known as ‘scaffolding’.

To continue with the theme of classifying animals, when early European settlers – who had no prior experience of marsupials – first saw koalas in Australia, they incorrectly classified the tree-climbing animals as bears, a misnomer which is still widely used to this day. Making sure that scaffolding is in place for constructivist learning prevents incorrect conclusions from becoming accepted classifications for the learner, whilst still allowing the learner the freedom to find things out for themselves.

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E-Learning Design - Part 1 - Structure, Repetition and Reinforcement

E-Learning Design - Part 1 - Structure, Repetition and Reinforcement | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Emerging in the early part of the 20th century, behaviourism quickly became the main theory relating to how learning takes place. The theory is largely based on the results of experiments in which animals (including humans) learnt to display new behaviour patterns encouraged by repetition, reward and/or punishment.

For behaviourists, repetition is very important. John Watson, the father of behaviourism, suggested that the “more frequent a stimulus and response occur in association with each other, the stronger the habit will become.”

So how do reward and punishment reinforce behaviour, and motivate people to learn? Think back to when you were in school and the teacher set you homework. Your motivation to complete this work was probably influenced by at least one of the following:

* To achieve a good mark or praise from the teacher
* To avoid being shouted at by the teacher
* To avoid receiving detention
* To avoid having privileges taken away

These are all examples of reinforcement and punishment.

How Behaviourism Informs Pedagogy

Punishment is less helpful when it comes to adult learning – although it is still possible to use it effectively, you must be careful not to make your learner feel frustrated or undermined. However, reinforcement – in the form of positive feedback – can be just as rewarding for adult learners as it is for children. In our e-learning, we use reinforcement in the form of frequent feedback and praise:

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Will tech solve teacher shortages?

Will tech solve teacher shortages? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Proponents say blended learning classrooms can scale the work of effective teachers and save money.

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Using technology to alleviate the need to hire more teachers is a controversial approach. And even when the goal is to support teachers already in the classroom and place newer teachers in an apprenticeship role, blended learning doesn’t solve several of the issues most say are at the core of shortages: low teacher pay and polarized education discourse.

But some say the issue it can address — unqualified teachers — can make a big difference, even down the road, if shortages let up. “Part of the challenge of having an unexperienced teacher in the classroom is that in traditional models that person is totally isolated from other more experienced people to learn from,” Rabbitt told EdSurge. “An exciting thing about blended learning is that it can give us more flexibility about how to use teacher time and learning space. Imagine having a bigger, more dynamic classroom with a very experienced teacher and a new teacher working together.”


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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World’s first group MOOC set to ignite global social change

PRESS RELEASE: For Immediate Release World’s first group MOOC set to ignite global social change The world’s first GROOC – a MOOC for groups – co-cr...

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Peter Mellow's curator insight, August 28, 9:26 PM

"The GROOC’s unique design will revolutionise online learning" - A bold claim!

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The Importance of Granular Learning Analytics to Micro-Learning Providers

The Importance of Granular Learning Analytics to Micro-Learning Providers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The growth of alternative education and training providers continues. Companies like Udemy, Udacity, Codecademy, Fulbridge and General Assembly appear to be settling in for the long run and are expected to be a significant component of the expanding learning eco-system for adults.


Via Julie Tardy
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Why Students Need More Control Over Their Online Education

Why Students Need More Control Over Their Online Education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Wondering how to enhance the Online Education experience for students? Check why you need to give students more control over their Online Education.

Via Peter Mellow
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Search results show MOOCs are driving online brand awareness for universities

Search results show MOOCs are driving online brand awareness for universities | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Think of a university, any university. Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard or Yale may spring to mind. Or your local university, or the one you or someone you know attended. I’m fairly sure that the University…

Via Christelle Bozelle
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Working memory and teaching the ten percent

Working memory and teaching the ten percent | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

‘Working memory’ is the brain’s post-it note. It allows you to hold information in mind and WORK with it. We make mental scribbles of what we need to remember. By understanding working memory you will be able to better support children’s learning and concentration. Most children have a working memory that is strong enough to quickly find the book and open to the correct page, but some don’t – approximately 10% in any classroom. A student who loses focus and often daydreams may fall in this 10%. A student who isn’t living up to their potential may fall in this 10%. A student who may seem unmotivated may fall in this 10%. In the past, many of these students would have languished at the bottom of the class, because their problems seemed insurmountable and a standard remedy like extra tuition didn’t solve them. But emerging evidence shows that many of these children can improve their performance by focusing on their working memory. Working memory is a foundational skill in the classroom and when properly supported it can often turn around a struggling student’s prospects.

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Why the edtech bubble could burst

Why the edtech bubble could burst | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There is mounting evidence, however, that without proper teacher training and accommodation for already busy schedules and lack of funding for building tech skills, any effort to bring devices into the classroom will likely fizzle.

“In every case of failure I have observed, the one-to-one computing plan puts enormous focus on the device itself, the enhancement of the network, and training teachers to use the technology,” Alan November of November Learning, an educational support services firm, wrote in a 2013 editorial. “Adding a digital device to the classroom without a fundamental change in the culture of teaching and learning will not lead to significant improvement. Unless clear goals across the curriculum—such as the use of math to solve real problems—are articulated at the outset, one-to-one computing becomes ‘spray and pray.’”
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Using Grading Policies to Promote Learning

Using Grading Policies to Promote Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

We take our grading responsibilities seriously, although most of us wouldn’t rank grading among our favorite teaching tasks. Grades matter—to students, their parents, those who award scholarships, employers, and graduate and professional schools. Who doesn’t think they’re important? But our focus is on the grades, not the policies that govern what’s graded, how much a certain activity counts, or those mechanisms used to calculate the grades.

When students talk about the grades we’ve “given” them, we are quick to point out that we don’t “give” grades, students “earn” them. And that’s correct. It’s what the student does that determines the grade. But that statement sort of implies that we don’t have much of a role in the process—that we’re simply executing what the grading policy prescribes. We shouldn’t let that response cloud our thinking. Who sets up the course grading policy? Who controls it? Who has the power to change it or to refuse to change it? It’s these policies that involve us up to our eyeballs.

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A Quick & Dirty Guide to Perfect Digital Note-Taking

A Quick & Dirty Guide to Perfect Digital Note-Taking | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
All things being equal, I’d choose handwritten notes over digital notes any day of the week — but all things aren’t equal. While I love the feel of pen, pad, and paper, the truth is that digital notes are way more convenient in this modern age.

There are several downsides, of course, and we’ll address them throughout this article, but the biggest problem is that it’s hard to be efficient as a digital note-taker. It’s just not as easy or fluid as traditional notes — that is, until you learn how to take notes the right way.

Here are some of the most effective tips for becoming a digital note-taking pro, and they’re so useful that you may even end up preferring digital over handwritten!
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What Happens When Freud Meets Modern Neuroscience

What Happens When Freud Meets Modern Neuroscience | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The emerging field of “neuropsychoanalysis” is combining two fundamentally different areas of study for a whole new way of understanding how the mind works.

Via Maggie Rouman
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