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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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'Connectivism': Creating Learning Communities

'Connectivism': Creating Learning Communities | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In the field of online sharing and learning, the “Massive Open Online Course” (“MOOC”) has received a lot of attention. Many are enthusiastic about what elite universities such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Harvard are piloting. The two schools have offered joint online courses that have attracted well over 100,000 students. Much is also written about the start-up ventures Udacity and Coursera, which managed to enroll over two million students in just one year. These ventures provide a forum to some of the world’s best professors to host their lectures online. The students are then encouraged to participate through online forums that help build a joint learning community. They typically do not offer academic credit aside from, in some cases, a statement of completion. But they also do not charge tuition. There are estimates that only about ten percent of students who sign up for courses actually follow them until the end [4. See article by Tamar Lewin (2013, January 1): “Students Rush to Web Classes, but Profits May Be Much Later”, New York Times]. And it still remains to be seen whether mass distribution of centralized online lectures will ultimately be incorporated into the formal educational system or whether they are just briefly hyped by universities and venture capitalists searching for new revenue sources and recognition.
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Survey Says: Many Higher Ed Faculty Still Lack Awareness of OER

Survey Says: Many Higher Ed Faculty Still Lack Awareness of OER | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
THE ELUSIVE HUNT FOR OER: Open Educational Resources (OER) is one of those ideas that everyone likes in principle but few actually use. Between two-thirds and three-quarters of college faculty say they are unaware of OER, according to a Babson/Pearson survey of 2,144 faculty members. Part of the

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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What a MOOC Is and What It Isn’t

What a MOOC Is and What It Isn’t | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

A MOOC is one part of a solution, not a panacea for all of today’s training challenges.

In the early days of MOOCs, Sebastian Thrun boldly claimed that in 50 years there would be only 10 universities left in the world. He stepped back from the idea that MOOCs could solve all of education’s problems after Udacity’s courses didn’t perform nearly as well as expected in a pilot program at San Jose State University. The problem was the idea that you could just turn a course into a MOOC and it would instantly be a success, an assumption that turned out to be false.

MOOCs can solve many of today’s common training problems, but only if they are developed using a solid, research-backed pedagogical approach. Putting boring training online doesn’t make it engaging; putting well-designed training online in a format that resonates with employees does.

When developing training courses and programs, learning professionals would do best to think of MOOCs as just one tool in a constantly expanding toolbox.

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

A MOOC is one part of a solution, not a panacea for all of today’s training challenges.

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elearnspace › What I’ve learned in my first week of a dual-layer MOOC (DALMOOC)

My reflections after week one of DALMOOC:

1. The first few weeks are identical to any other MOOC I’ve run. It’s chaos. Learners are unsure about how to position themselves in relation to the content and the interaction spaces. This is a critical sensemaking and wayfinding process. In a MOOC, we not only learn content, but we also learn the metcognitive processes and digital space markers that enable us to be active participants. This can be stressful for learners.

2. Learners really, really like content. I view content to be as much a by-product of the learning process as a pre-requisite. Lectures can be helpful in framing a topic. What is important though, is that learners create artifacts. An artifact represents how we understand something and then allows others to provide us feedback and shape, fact-check, and refine our thinking (have a look at a Private Universe – a detailed account of what happens when students only answer questions we ask rather than create artifacts that reflect how they understand a topic area).

3. There seems to be a growing number of professional learners in formal platforms (edX & Coursera). These learners have clear goals, want a certificate, and have expectations of the experience. In one forum interaction of DALMOOC, a learner mentioned that he/she had taken 30 MOOCs and this one was the most disorienting. Another learner said this was the worst MOOC that they had ever taken. Early MOOCs were easy to run because expectations hadn’t normalized. It’s different now. Learners engage with MOOCs with views of what should be happening and are comparing courses to what they’ve taken recently. The standards of quality content are higher than they were in the past.

4. The most important learning shift is not yet happening. Learning in complex knowledge environments requires navigating distributed spaces (wayfinding), acting with partial information, sensemaking, and becoming comfortable without reading everything. This shift is difficult – it’s as much a world view shift as a learning task, as much about our identity as the learning content. It’s not easy and it’s unsettling and frustrating.

5. Learners act differently in different spaces. If you are in the course, skim the edX discussions. Then log into ProSolo. Skim the interactions there. Do the same with social media (our G+ and Facebook pages as well as the #DALMOOC twitter timeline). The tools and spaces are linked here. The conversation in edX, when discussing the course, is ~60% critical. In Prosolo, it’s largely positive. I find the negative comments in edX about structure a bit confusing as I view choices as giving learners the ability to be where they want to be rather than where designers and instructors force them to be. I chuckled at Matt’s tweet:

6. We need to get better at on-boarding learners to engage in digital distributed spaces. My comments above reflect real experiences of learners who are finding the course format confusing. It’s not sufficient to say “well, what you really need is a world-view shift”. As designers, we have to support and guide that transition. We are not doing that well enough. Even though early Hangouts that we did in the course emphasized learner autonomy and the importance of developing a personal digital identity that is under the control of the individual learner, this message is understood through practice not to proclamation. It’s a challenging proposition: a learner understands the design intentions of the course by engaging in the activities but these activities are confusing because they do not understand the design intentions.

7. Technology glitches are tough. We are using a number of new tools in DALMOOC, including Carolyn Rose’s Bazaar and Quick Helper, a visual syllabus, Prosolo, assignment bank, and so on. We’ve had some glitches with most of those, as can be expected in a new tool being scaled to a large number of users. Learners may forgive a glitch or two. But each additional glitch or tool creates additional stress. A few learners have said “I feel like a guinea pig” and “I feel like I’m just beta testing software” and “I feel like a rat in a maze”. We need some tolerance for failure during experimentation. There is a line though where even the most committed learners feel overwhelmed.

8. Learners use discussion forums for different reasons. I’ve generally used them for discussion. Learners in edX use them for a range of reasons including quick search/help, venting, and as a way of orienting to the course. Unfortunately, I haven’t seen much in MOOC forums about social relationship formation. MOOC providers have done a bad job of building learner profiles. I can’t get to know my peers in edX or Coursera. This is an issue. Distributed social media improves this, but the social connectedness in edX forums is almost non-existent.

Overall, the first ten days of DALMOOC have provided an excellent learning experience for me. I’ve included a short presentation below on Sensemaking and Wayfinding Information Model (SWIM) that focuses on how learners engage in and navigate open learning spaces, largely reflective of the experiences of learners in this MOOC.
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5 Key Considerations for Multi-Device Testing | The Upside Learning Blog

5 Key Considerations for Multi-Device Testing | The Upside Learning Blog | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Ensuring that your multi-device eLearning runs consistently and smoothly across the identified range of devices, screen sizes, browsers, and platforms is crucial to deliver an engaging and consistent learning experience for your users.

But the sheer number of device-OS-browser combinations and the set of test parameters which need to be checked for EACH combination make the testing process complex, to say the least.
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How Content Curation Informs Content Creation

How Content Curation Informs Content Creation | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

If you are actively curating content as a business strategy, you are sitting on a great source of guidance to help you pick good topics. Of course you’ll monitor success of your own content over time. But there’s more. You should keep tabs on a wider range of content to expand your purview.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, October 28, 11:37 AM

Content curation is not just a placeholder for the lack of inspiration or time to create great content. While it certainly can help publish relevant good content in the lack of a brilliant original content idea, it's also a great way to generate some


As this post highlights in the context of a content marketing strategy, you will understand what type of content you need to create if you consistently watch what's going on in your industry through regular content curation. By publishing the content you've curated, you will also generate and measure reactions from your target audience. Think of it as real life market study for content strategists.


So as I've often commented, this is the reason why content curation often is the easiest strategy to start as part of a content plan: not only because it comes naturally by building on what you already do (read content on your topics of expertise) but also because it makes the original content creation part easier and better. 

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What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child?

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"The Limbic Reward System lights up when curiosity is piqued. " (LA Johnson/NPR)

 

"New research suggests that curiosity triggers chemical changes in the brain that help students better understand and retain information."

 

"Curiosity really is one of the very intense and very basic impulses in humans. We should base education on this behavior.’"


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14 Alternatives to Google Analytics

14 Alternatives to Google Analytics | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Analytics platforms are essential for merchants to glean insight into what drives their traffic. Google Analytics is the popular choice, but there are many other analytics tools available.

Here is a list of analytics tools to help you collect and measure your customer data. Some of these applications are general analytics programs, akin to Google Analytics, to quantify traffic. Other applications look at specific aspects of the customer and should be used in conjunction with a general analytics program.
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A Manifesto for teaching online (2013 remix)

In autumn 2011 I was commissioned to create a video to contribute towards the dissemination of the 'Manifesto for teaching online' that grew out of a research project at Edinburgh University exploring 'Student writing: innovative online strategies for assessment and feedback'.

Two years later, I was invited to talk about the video as part a course for tutors at the University who are involved or interested in online education. Prompted to revisit the video, I saw flaws or opportunities for improvement that hadn't been apparent when I created the original. Influenced and informed by my own research into multimodality, I wanted to take a more critical approach to the representation of ideas within the video.

My original attempt had intended to reflect the range of digital communicational tools and environments that online students can exploit and explore. I also wanted to make a point about the power of fauxtography in digital space. Within this new version however I've attempted to take a more rhetorical approach, where the images help to further the arguments proposed within the different Manifesto statements. I've also created a new soundtrack that it is intended to work more effectively alongside the images and words.

I think that this new orchestration of communicational modes better represents the Manifesto (or at least, my interpretation of it).
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What’s Wrong With MOOCs, and Why Aren’t They Changing the Game in Education? | WIRED

What’s Wrong With MOOCs, and Why Aren’t They Changing the Game in Education? | WIRED | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Currently, just 10 percent of MOOC registrants complete their courses. Why — if all the materials are free and available with the click of a mouse? MOOCs are structured using a series of pre-recorded video-based, self-paced classes offered to students for free. There are no live instructors to help facilitate the classes, lectures or content. There is also no straight-and-narrow path from beginning-to-end and the format does not encourage the exchange of different thoughts and ideas among learners. The lack of live instructor involvement also means no follow-up with the student, or any assurance along the way that the student’s learning trajectory is heading in the right direction. At the course’s conclusion, only the learner can determine if he or she was successful.

The modern MOOC — without live and interactive teacher engagement — is essentially an Internet version of a book. That said, there is tremendous potential for the MOOC to evolve in a major way. To reduce dropout rates, the MOOC must be structured around live teacher engagement.
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Future of Education through Octalysis Gamification

Yu-kai Chou Describes the Future of Education to Faculty Members of Agder University of Norway.

Via Aevalle Galicia, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Conversation on Workplace Learning and Literacy - with Stephen Downes

Framed around the LPSS program, and looking at specific issues such as workplace learning and literacy, this discussion outlines some of my views on the prob...

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Connectivism: A New Culture of Learning | Web 2.0 Tools for Learning: Collaborative Community Building

Connectivism: A New Culture of Learning | Web 2.0 Tools for Learning: Collaborative Community Building | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The two articles we read this week: Connectivism by George Siemens and Arc of life of learning: A new culture of learning by JSB and Thomas outline a new theory to think about learning and what it means to be part of a digital connected community.

In what ways do the texts envision a new framework or ecology of learning? I.e., what are the basic tenets or requirements of new learning environments?
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Story of the web

Story of the web | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The World Wide Web has gone from "never heard of it" to "can't live without it" in 25 years. It took off because of its instant user appeal, but also because it's open and free. From HTML to hacktivism, the W3C to MP3s, lolcats to LulzSec, from one website to over 180 million, here are its defining moments.
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

(Hi)story of the web!

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Potential and Value of using Digital Badges for Adult Learners


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Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, & Learning Science

Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, & Learning Science | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
By Abbie Brown | Abbie Brown created a magazine on Flipboard. “Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology, & Learning Science” is available with thousands of other magazines and all the news you care about. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Abbie Brown”.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Coursera and Udacity's CEOs Talk about their Latest Developments - MOOC Report

Coursera and Udacity's CEOs Talk about their Latest Developments - MOOC Report | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Coursera CEO Rick Levin and Udacity CEO Sebastian Thrun give talks, discussing their companies' new developments.

Via Peter Mellow
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Professional Development in 21st Century Education - Electronic Brains

Professional Development in 21st Century Education - Electronic Brains | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Like many other teachers, when I entered my teaching career almost 13 years ago, I used a computer to type up lesson plans and to create worksheets. I had two computers in my classroom, and my students used them to play math or language games. I sent and received e-mails, and I researched the topics I would soon be planning for my students. At the time, I never dreamed of the countless options that are available to us today.

Today, I am proud to say that I have gone beyond the classroom in my use of computers and the internet. I tweet, blog, and communicate with my students. I conduct research related to trending topics in education, and rely on the professional learning networks I belong to in order to stay apprised with changes in digital pedagogy. I also encourage students to engage in participatory media through sites like Edmodo, and tools offered in Google Apps. I encourage collaboration, and provide students with web based tools to encourage them to do the same.

I have made slow and steady changes over time thanks to the countless professional development opportunities available to educators, guidance from the strong administrative team where I am a teacher, not to mention the explosion of professional discourse available through the social media networks I belong to. One of the professional development opportunities which made a lasting impression on me was the Connect 2013 Conference.
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In the Future Your Therapy and Education Will Be Tailored to Your Brain | MIND Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

In the Future Your Therapy and Education Will Be Tailored to Your Brain | MIND Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Looking at individual-level information on brain processes could also be useful for figuring out who would best benefit from specific training regimens or learning techniques. Currently, in a project led by cognitive neuroscientist Joseph Hopfinger at the University of North Carolina, we are collecting functional MRI data on college students using the brain-training programs offered by Lumosity, an online brain-training company. Data indicate that Lumosity games can increase cognitive abilities such as working memory, processing speed and attention. We want to identify those individuals most likely to benefit from this training by looking at their brain processes. The results might help us develop cognitive training methods tailored to different types of brains, enabling more people to benefit from the technology.

Instead of comparing brain patterns of those who improve after training with those who do not, we built models of brain processes in individual brains to look for the various processes that predict improvement of cognitive performance after training. This method enables us to separate people who may have scored equally well but who approach cognitive tasks differently, so are heterogeneous in their brain processes. Revealing these potentially various neurobiological underpinnings of improvement will enable researchers to tailor brain-training programs to the needs and deficits of individuals. For example, by looking at patterns that related to no improvement, researchers may be able to develop training protocols that target specific connections among regions. Our work should enable Lumosity to provide products that help a wider group of consumers. Having even better tools for keeping the mind sharp will become increasingly important as the nation’s aging population experiences the expected cognitive decline.
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Surveillance: The hidden ways you’re tracked

Surveillance: The hidden ways you’re tracked | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Do you have secrets? Security expert Bruce Schneier has little patience for those who say they don’t.

When asked about government and corporate surveillance, there are some who shrug their shoulders and say they have nothing to fear because they have nothing to hide. Schneier’s response? “I ask them their salary and they won’t tell me. I ask them about their sexual fantasy world and they won’t tell me. The whole ‘I have nothing to hide’ thing is stupid, that’s a dumb comment,” he says. What’s more, your day-to-day behaviour is monitored in ways you wouldn’t even realise, so these details and many more could be open for all to see – and use against you. And that’s a problem, even if you happen to trust your government to use the data for good.

Schneier, who spoke at BBC Future’s World-Changing Ideas Summit on 21 October (see video, above), helped journalist Glenn Greenwald analyse Edward Snowden’s leaked documents from the National Security Agency. The controversy was recently documented in the film Citizenfour, and consciously or not, Schneier’s sentiments echo Snowden’s own words in an early email to the film’s director Laura Poitras: “Every cell phone tower you pass, friend you keep, article you write, site you visit, subject line you type, and packet you route, is in the hands of a system whose reach is unlimited but whose safeguards are not.”
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Mirror Neurons and the Pitfalls of Brain Research « Science-Based Medicine

Mirror Neurons and the Pitfalls of Brain Research « Science-Based Medicine | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"In his new book The Myth of Mirror Neurons: The Real Neuroscience of Communication and Cognition , Gregory Hickok, a professor of cognitive science, challenges current conceptions about mirror neurons. He shows how a complex mythology arose and why it is unwarranted, how experimental results were misinterpreted and disconfirming evidence ignored, and how other interpretations might lead to better insights about how the brain works.

 

"I couldn’t say it any better than Steven Pinker did on the jacket blurb:

"'Every now and again an idea from science escapes from the lab and takes on a life of its own as an explanation for all mysteries, a validation of our deepest yearnings, and irresistible bait for journalists and humanities scholars…Hickok puts an end to this monkey business by showing that mirror neurons do not, in fact, explain language, empathy, society, and world peace. But this is not a negative exposé—the reader of this book will learn a great deal of the contemporary sciences of language, mind, and brain, and will find that the reality is more exciting than the mythology.'"


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Manifesto for teaching online

Manifesto for teaching online | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Influenced and informed by my own research into multimodality, I wanted to take a more critical approach to the representation of ideas within the video… Within this new version I’ve attempted to take a more rhetorical approach, where the images help to further the arguments proposed within the different Manifesto statements. I’ve also created a new soundtrack that it is intended to work more effectively alongside the images and words. I think that this new orchestration of communicational modes better represents the Manifesto (or at least, my interpretation of it).
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MOOCs - Expectations & Reality (Report May 2014)


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Lars-Göran Hedström's curator insight, October 29, 3:08 AM

A study that have been watching for evidence that MOOCs are cost-effective in producing desirable educational outcomes compared to face-to-face experiences or other online interventions.

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EduGeek Journal » MOOCs and Codes of Conduct

EduGeek Journal » MOOCs and Codes of Conduct | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Even before the whole GamerGate thing blew up, I had been considering adding a Code of Conduct to the DALMOOC. UTA has always required an Honor Code in all course syllabuses, so to me this issue was a no-brainer (even though we aren’t treating DALMOOC as a specific UTA-only course). But I know others don’t see the need for Codes in general, so I wanted to dig more into the reasoning behind a Code of Conduct for online courses – especially MOOCs.

I know some feel that you can’t really stop bad people with just a statement, and that usually the community will rise up to get rid of the abusers and trolls anyways. Sometimes both of those are true. But not always.

I have been a part of Facebook groups that did not have a code and ended up leaving. You would think the group would have risen up to stop people from being abusive, but that was not the case. And when I spoke up? Well, it quickly became time to leave. I have also been in some groups that did have a code in them and witnessed first hand seeing someone asked to comply with the code and – believe it or not – they stopped, apologized, and changed. It does work sometimes.

But other times it doesn’t. So you can’t just say “be cool to everyone” and leave it at that. There has to be a threat of consequences from the people in charge for the Code to have teeth. The problem with using the UTA Honor Code in a MOOC was that it was designed for a small group of people in a closed system where you can ultimately with one click boot out people that don’t comply. And then send the police after them if they don’t get the message. Open online courses, though? A lot trickier to enforce.

So, I turned to the work of Ashe Dryden and her recommendations for conference codes of conduct. Since conferences are a bit more open than closed online courses, I thought that would be a good place to start. I also decided to add links to the privacy statements of all services we recommend, as well as links to reporting abuse on those services. I felt people needed to be aware of these issues, as well as know what one place to go to access the, all. If I should add anything else, please let me know.

So you might wonder why the language is so specific on the Code. Just tell people to be cool or else your out, right? The problem is that this is too vague. Some people can be very abusive in a way that flies under the radar of most gatekeepers, because they are looking for obvious hateful words and actions. True abusers have found ways to go under the radar. So we need to be as specific as possible in these codes as a way to empower our learning communities to know what to look for in the first place. You can’t just expect the community to rise up and fight abusers – you have to give them the tools and words to use in order to fight. And one of those tools needs to be an appeal to authority. You see, its one thing to say “I think you are being abusive, stop” and another to say “the rules say this: _____.” Trust me from experience: abusers rarely care when you come in and say “stop treating this person that way because I think you are wrong.” If we want our communities to rise up and stop abuse, we have to empower them with the tools and words they need from us as the leaders. Yes, they are able to come up with their own words; however, it is much more powerful when their words match ours instead of fill in our blanks.

And I know what many say: “this will never happen – I have never seen abuse happening in classes.” I hope that is true. But I would encourage you to look into recent cyber bullying research. Many people that experience abuse do not speak up because they feel no one will listen. So is the fact that you have never heard of abuse online a sign that there is none, or that no one thinks you are a safe person to discuss the issues with? An important difference there.

Think of it this way. The DALMOOC has over 18,000 people signed up last I heard. That is more people than thousands of small towns in America. Thousands of towns that also have a crime rate and an abuse rate. If even small towns can’t escape from attracting criminals and abusers, how sure are we that our MOOCs will?

And oh yeah: #stopgamergate. Call me a SJW or whatever you want. I wear it proudly.
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Classroom Organisation

Classroom Organisation | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A Must Have Pinterest Cheat Sheet for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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