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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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The case for agile pedagogy

The case for agile pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There is, though, another approach to both software development and, I think, curriculum design. In the world of programming, ideas of adaptive design and the lightweight approaches of the 90s were crystallised in 2001 with the publication of the Manifesto for Agile Software Development, which, while acknowledging that while processes and tools, comprehensive documentation, contract negotiation and following a plan all have their value, much more is gained through focusing on individuals and interactions, getting software that works, collaborating with customers and responding to change.

With a little adaptation, these are ideas which many of us would see as important in a more learner centric, flexible approach to teaching: an approach where we teach the pupils and students we work with, not the ring binder we're given.

Focusing on individuals and interactions means, I think, a serious attempt to provide the personalised learning we used to hear so much about, itself a reiteration of the heady days of Plowden's "At the heart of the educational process lies the child". If Gove goes ahead and "disapplies" the ICT programmes of study, we have an opportunity to tailor what we teach as well as how we teach to the needs, enthusiasms and aspirations of each learner – to ask, "What would you like to learn?" and then to help each find ways to teach themselves and one another.
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Learning Analysis of Social Networks

Learning Analysis of Social Networks | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Network Elements
Social networks have some key structural elements that can be identified in order to establish a common language and conceptual model. This allows us to analyze them. In this mooc we discussed three key elements, the actor, relations, and data sources.

Actor
The actor is a node or vertex within the network. In social networks this is typically a person or learner, but I don’t think it would necessarily need to be a person.

Relations
The relation in the network refers to the ties, edges, arcs, and links that connect the actors. Relations can be undirected and weighted or they can have a direction, meaning that an actor can be the sender and any actor that receives data can be the receiver. So, actors can be senders or receivers or both.

Additionally, the relation between two actors can also be labeled or categorized. This means they can represent something, such as friendship, advice, hindrance, or can be a form of communication. I would imagine this could be a very interesting component of network analysis to try and identify and define these relations for the purpose of understanding the learner, the network, or the context.
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Instructional Design Strategy for M-learning

Instructional Design Strategy for M-learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Most of the organizations are using mobile learning to improve the performance of their workforces. Mobile learning or mLearning is learning facilitated through mobile devices, and the learner need not stay at a fixed location to access mobile learning courses. Initially, mobile learning was viewed from the framework of eLearning. However, eLearning content and design cannot be adapted automatically to mLearning because of the variations in the screen sizes, layout of devices and compatibility of the output. Therefore, content for mobile learning courses to be viewed differently.
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Richard P. Lo's curator insight, November 24, 7:11 PM
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The Real Revolution in Online Education Isn’t MOOCs

Why competency-based education matters.

 

Data is confirming what we already know: recruiting is an imprecise activity, and degrees don’t communicate much about a candidate’s potential and fit. Employers need to know what a student knows and can do.


Something is clearly wrong when only 11% of business leaders — compared to 96% of chief academic officers — believe that graduates have the requisite skills for the workforce. It’s therefore unlikely that business leaders are following closely what’s going on in higher education. Even the latest hoopla around massive open online courses (MOOCs) amounts to more of the same: academics designing courses that correspond with their own interests rather than the needs of the workforce, but now doing it online.

 

But there is a new wave of online competency-based learning providers that has absolutely nothing to do with offering free, massive, or open courses. In fact, they’re not even building courses per se, but creating a whole new architecture of learning that has serious implications for businesses and organizations around the world.

 

It’s called online competency-based education, and it’s going to revolutionize the workforce.

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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 24, 5:21 PM

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Preparing for Higher Education 2030 featuring George Siemens

The scope of change accumulating around higher education is significant. Questions exist around the future of work in a robot economy, the role of faculty in a distributed and networked future, and the broad role of universities in a society of easy access to global information and open online courses.

During this COIL Fischer Speaker Series Event, George Siemens, Executive Director of the Learning Innovation and Networked Knowledge Research Lab at The University of Texas at Arlington, explores the prominent change pressures building for higher education and presents a vision of the role that universities will play in society in the next 20 years.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Prompts to Help Students Reflect on How They Approach Learning

Prompts to Help Students Reflect on How They Approach Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Teaching Professor Blog

 

"One of the best gifts teachers can give students are the experiences that open their eyes to themselves as learners. Most students don’t think much about how they learn. Mine used to struggle to write a paragraph describing the study approaches they planned to use in my communication courses. However, to be fair, I’m not sure I had a lot of insights about my learning when I was a student. Did you?
As fall courses start to wind down, it’s an apt time for reflection. Here are some pithy (I hope) prompts that might motivate students to consider their beliefs about learning."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 12, 11:38 AM

Maryellen Weimer provides us with a list of well crafted and thought provoking prompts for reflection.  This kind of thinking (and responding) is essential for both students and teachers.

sian etherington's curator insight, November 24, 9:40 AM

Reflecting on your own learning as a teacher is very helpful for thinking about your own students' learning and your own approaches to teaching.

Claire Brooks's curator insight, November 24, 5:01 PM

good prompts for developing reflective practice about self as learner. Might work in with some aspects of Learning Analytics too.

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Ten Hottest Disruptive Technologies in Higher Education

Ten Hottest Disruptive Technologies in Higher Education

Via ғelιх c ѕeyғarтн, Vladimir Kukharenko, Peter Mellow
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Screencast-O-Matic: An Essential (Free) Tool for the Digital Classroom

Screencast-O-Matic: An Essential (Free) Tool for the Digital Classroom | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Whether you are flipping the classroom or just recording an instructional video, Screencast-O-Matic makes screencasting for educators as simple as possible.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 22, 9:56 PM

This post is another example of the "Bitesize" PD that Fractus Learning offers. Screencast-O-Matic allows you to create videos a presentation that is on your computer. It is easy to use, and their is both a free version and a premium version. The sections covered in this post are:

1. Instructional walkthroughs

2. Record presentations and slides

3. Flipped lessons

4. Student guides

5. The power of post-processing

In addition there is a short video that provides and overview and links and next steps which provides tutorials about Screencast-O-Matic, flipped learning, assessment and more.

Dr. Laura Sheneman's curator insight, November 23, 10:40 AM

Indispensable tool for anyone who trains.

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, November 23, 4:14 PM

The free version doesn't record audio, so use Jing which is free but only records 5 minute videos. Otherwise, pay for Screencast-O-Matic or pay for Snagit (Educator license)..Snagit has lots of features for screenshots and no limits on your video length.

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A New Zealand analysis of MOOCs

A New Zealand analysis of MOOCs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Am I alone in wondering what has happened to for-credit online education in government thinking about the future? It is as if 20 years of development of undergraduate and graduate online courses and programs never existed. Surely a critical question for institutions and government planners is:

what are the relative advantages and disadvantages of MOOCs over other forms of online learning? What can MOOCs learn from our prior experience with credit-based online learning?

There are several reasons for considering this, but one of the most important is the huge investment many institutions, and, indirectly, governments. have already made in credit-based online learning.

By and large, online learning in publicly funded universities, both in New Zealand and in Canada, has been very successful in terms of both increasing access and in student learning. It is also important to be clear about the differences and some of the similarities between credit-based online learning and MOOCs.

Some of the implications laid out in this paper, such as possibilities of consortia and institutional collaboration, apply just as much to credit-based online learning as to MOOCs, and many of the negative criticisms of MOOCs, such as difficulties of assessment and lack of learner support, disappear when applied to credit-based online learning.

Please, policy-makers, realise that MOOCs are not your only option for innovation through online learning. There are more established and well tested solutions already available.
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Cesar Oswaldo Cesaroswaldo's curator insight, November 22, 8:27 PM

Hi, enjoy this reading, tell me about it¡¡ thanks bye

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 23, 10:07 AM

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Don't get hacked! Research shows how much we ignore online warnings

Don't get hacked! Research shows how much we ignore online warnings | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
New research finds that people say they care about online security but behave like they don't -- such as ignoring security warnings. To better understand how people deal with security messages, researchers simulated hacking into study subjects laptops. The responses were telling.
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Why Have Our Brains Started to Shrink?

Why Have Our Brains Started to Shrink? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Christopher Stringer, a paleoanthropologist and research leader on human origins at the Natural History Museum in London, replies:

Indeed, skeletal evidence from every inhabited continent suggests that our brains have become smaller in the past 10,000 to 20,000 years. How can we account for this seemingly scary statistic?

Some of the shrinkage is very likely related to the decline in humans' average body size during the past 10,000 years. Brain size is scaled to body size because a larger body requires a larger nervous system to service it. As bodies became smaller, so did brains. A smaller body also suggests a smaller pelvic size in females, so selection would have favored the delivery of smaller-headed babies.

What explains our shrinking body size, though? This decline is possibly related to warmer conditions on the earth in the 10,000 years after the last ice age ended. Colder conditions favor bulkier bodies because they conserve heat better. As we have acclimated to warmer temperatures, the way we live has also generally become less physically demanding, which overall serves to drive down body weights.

Another likely reason for this decline is that brains are energetically expensive and will not be maintained at larger sizes unless it is necessary. The fact that we increasingly store and process information externally—in books, computers and online—means that many of us can probably get by with smaller brains. Some anthropologists have also proposed that larger brains may be less efficient at certain tasks, such as rapid computation, because of longer connection pathways.

The way we live may have affected brain size. For instance, domesticated animals have smaller brains than their wild counterparts probably because they do not require the extra brainpower that could help them evade predators or hunt for food. Similarly, humans have become more domesticated. But as long as we keep our brains fit for our particular lifestyles, there should be no reason to fear for the collective intelligence of our species.
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elearn Magazine: Gamification: Using Game Mechanics to Enhance eLearning

elearn Magazine: Gamification: Using Game Mechanics to Enhance eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Maybe you've heard of the term "gamification," and perhaps you're wondering what it is and how it can be applied to eLearning. In short, gamification is the use of gameplay mechanics for non-game applications. Almost as important, as a definition of what it is, is a definition of what it's not. Gamification is not the inclusion of stand-alone games in eLearning (or, whatever gamification is being applied to). It also has very little to do with art-styles, themes, or the application of narrative. Rather, game mechanics are the construct of rules that encourage users to explore and learn the properties of their possibility space through the use of feedback mechanisms. With gamification, these "possibility spaces" have been expanded beyond just games into other areas like marketing, education, the workplace, social media, philanthropy, and the Web, just to name a few. As a game designer now making eLearning software, I've found that much of what is used to build engagement in games can also be applied to other interactive material such as eLearning.

In the 15 years I've been making video games, a frequently discussed topic in the game industry has been on ways to engage users; a theme that I've found is enthusiastically discussed in the eLearning space. Since the primary reason to apply gamification to eLearning is to engage learners, the focus of this article is on describing gameplay mechanics that have been proven to be engaging.
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A New Tool to Search for Images Licensed for School Use

A New Tool to Search for Images Licensed for School Use | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Photos for Class is a very good web tool that you and your students can use to search for and download Creative Common licensed images. The search engine of Photos for Class uses Flickr safe search to return results that are licensed for school use.


Via John Evans
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jose antonio gabelas's curator insight, November 25, 1:41 PM

AÑADA su visión ...

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Learning To Learning: 7 Critical Shifts

Learning To Learning: 7 Critical Shifts | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
TEST Learning To Learning: 7 Critical Shifts
by TeachThought Staff
Guy Claxton is professor of education at Bristol University, and author of Hare Brain, Tortoise Mind How Intelligence Increases When You Think Less (1997).

Via Charles Fischer
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Charles Fischer's curator insight, November 25, 7:45 AM

These shifts are amazing learning goals. In particular, "critical curiosity" is perhaps the most important. Most of the "good" thinking questions asked in school are from the teachers. The ones asked by students are mostly clarifying questions about assignments. Students need far more opportunities to practice asking powerful questions.

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Open Educational Resources (OER): Resource Roundup

Open Educational Resources (OER): Resource Roundup | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Explore this educator's guide to open educational resources (OER) for information about online repositories, curriculum-sharing websites, sources for lesson plans and activities, and open alternatives to textbooks.
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Homework VS Facebook

Homework VS Facebook | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

I noticed an interesting report on the BBC news website a month ago or so concerning a growing trend of excessive use of social media by school children while doing online homework. It states that many parents try and control their children but find it hard to regulate how they use the internet. I can hear many of you say the same as one parent who says:  “There have always been distractions. I can remember being told off for reading Jackie magazine inside my textbooks.”  So, has anything changed?

 

I agree with this statement and can remember quite vividly sitting reading the Beano myself rather than learning my times tables. However, technology has not only had an impact on education and the way we are taught and learn at school but also on many other parts of society and therefore our lives as a whole.

 

In order to understand why our children are becoming compelled to look at social media I think we must look at how they connect with this media.

 

 


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 25, 8:33 AM

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BE VOCAL: Characteristics of Successful Online Instructors


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Digital Citizenship & Internet Maturity (Middle & Highschool Level) - Framework


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Take screenshots and screencasts for free, with Jing

Take screenshots and screencasts for free, with Jing | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Jing captures anything you see on your computer screen and lets you share it instantly. Sign up for your free account!

Via Dr Peter Carey
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Dr. Laura Sheneman's curator insight, November 24, 9:25 AM

I love this tool!  Free, quick, and easy to use.

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5 Heutagogical Tips to Empower Lifelong Learners Online

5 Heutagogical Tips to Empower Lifelong Learners Online | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
This post is for educators and instructional designers who want to learn more about heutagogy and implement strategies that empower lifelong learners online. We’ll cover it all and leave you with five actionable tips to guide your instructional design process.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

With it’s roots in andragogy, heutagogy puts mature learners in the driver’s seat, as the final stop in the learning continuum. In Heutagogy and Lifelong Learning: A Review of Heutagogical Practice and Self Determined Learning, Lisa Marie Blaschke writes, “in a heutagogical approach to teaching and learning… Emphasis is placed on development of learner capacity and capability with the goal of producing learners who are well-prepared for the complexities of today’s workforce.”

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Tip 1: Don’t Just Teach Content, Explain the Learning Process
Tip 2: Conduct a Needs Assessment
Tip 3: Offer Courses Asynchronously
Tip 4: Offer Bite-sized Learning
Tip 5: Enable Collaboration, Encourage Discussion

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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, November 24, 1:33 PM

Adoroooo discussão sobre eveoluçào da Andragogia 

Para um projeto educacional heutagógico, algumas premissas são essenciais:

1- Não preocupe-se em ensinar somente o conteudo. Inclua o processo de aprendizagem do tema.

2- Contemple um auto assessment

3- Ofereca cursos offline

4- Ofereca um pedacinho de aprendizagem como degustaçao

5- Permita colaboracao e encoraje discussão.

#avancee

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Why the fuss about MOOCs? Political, social and economic drivers

Why the fuss about MOOCs? Political, social and economic drivers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
These are all very powerful drivers of MOOC mania, which makes it all the more important to try to be clear and cool headed about the strengths and weaknesses of MOOCs. The real test is whether MOOCs can help develop the knowledge and skills that learners need in a knowledge-based society. The answer of course is yes and no.

As a low-cost supplement to formal education, they can be quite valuable, but not as a complete replacement. They can at present teach conceptual learning, comprehension and in a narrow range of activities, application of knowledge. They can be useful for building communities of practice, where already well educated people or people with a deep, shared passion for a topic can learn from one another, another form of continuing education.

However, certainly to date, MOOCs have not been able to demonstrate that they can lead to transformative learning, deep intellectual understanding, evaluation of complex alternatives, and evidence-based decision-making, and without greater emphasis on expert-based learner support and more qualitative forms of assessment, they probably never will, at least without substantial increases in their costs.

At the end of the day, there is a choice between throwing more resources into MOOCs and hoping that some of their fundamental flaws can be overcome without too dramatic an increase in costs, or whether we would be better investing in other forms of online learning and educational technology that could lead to more cost-effective learning outcomes. I know where I would put my money, and it’s not into MOOCs.
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

Great analysis by Tony Bates. Must read!

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The Internet of Things Is Far Bigger Than Anyone Realizes

The Internet of Things Is Far Bigger Than Anyone Realizes | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When people talk about “the next big thing,” they’re never thinking big enough. It’s not a lack of imagination; it’s a lack of observation. I’ve maintained that the future is always within sight, and you don’t need to imagine what’s already there.

Case in point: The buzz surrounding the Internet of Things.

What’s the buzz? The Internet of Things revolves around increased machine-to-machine communication; it’s built on cloud computing and networks of data-gathering sensors; it’s mobile, virtual, and instantaneous connection; and they say it’s going to make everything in our lives from streetlights to seaports “smart.”

But here’s what I mean when I say people don’t think big enough. So much of the chatter has been focused on machine-to-machine communication (M2M): devices talking to like devices. But a machine is an instrument, it’s a tool, it’s something that’s physically doing something. When we talk about making machines “smart,” we’re not referring strictly to M2M. We’re talking about sensors.

A sensor is not a machine. It doesn’t do anything in the same sense that a machine does. It measures, it evaluates; in short, it gathers data. The Internet of Things really comes together with the connection of sensors and machines. That is to say, the real value that the Internet of Things creates is at the intersection of gathering data and leveraging it. All the information gathered by all the sensors in the world isn’t worth very much if there isn’t an infrastructure in place to analyze it in real time.

Cloud-based applications are the key to using leveraged data. The Internet of Things doesn’t function without cloud-based applications to interpret and transmit the data coming from all these sensors. The cloud is what enables the apps to go to work for you anytime, anywhere.
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 23, 10:07 AM

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Simon Ladurée's curator insight, November 24, 11:06 AM

Suite de Wired sur les objets connectés ! 

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Top 10 eLearning Trends For 2015 Infographic

Top 10 eLearning Trends For 2015 Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

10 eLearning Trends to Follow in 2015 Infographic shows elearning professionals what to follow in the coming year.
1. Big Data
2. Gamification
3. Personalized Learning
4. Mobile Learning
5. Focus on Return-on-Investment
6. APIs
7. Automation
8. Augmented Learning
9. Corporate MOOCS
10. Rise of cloud LMS

 

 

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Teaching Practices Inventory Provides Tool to Help You Examine Your Teaching

Teaching Practices Inventory Provides Tool to Help You Examine Your Teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Here’s a great resource: the Teaching Practices Inventory. It’s an inventory that lists and scores the extent to which research-based teaching practices are being used. It’s been developed for use in math and science courses, but researchers Carl Wieman and Sarah Gilbert suggest it can be used in engineering and social sciences courses, although they have not tested it there. I suspect it has an even wider application. Most of the items on the inventory are or could be practiced in most disciplines and programs.

The article (in an open access journal and available on the website above) provides a detailed account of how the inventory was developed and has been tested so far. Carl Wieman is a Nobel Prize winner in physics who in recent years has been working on a variety of STEM projects. This article illustrates the high caliber of his work, completed with a variety of colleagues.

The inventory takes 10 to 15 minutes to complete (53% of the research cohort took it in 10 minutes or less) and is designed for use by individual faculty. It is a self-report inventory, with the power to promote a comprehensive review of and reflection on teaching practices. Inventory items are organized into eight categories: 1) course information provided to students; 2) supporting materials provided to students; 3) in-class features and activities; 4) assignments; 5) feedback and testing; 6) other (such as pre-post testing); 7) training and guidance of TAs; and 8) collaboration or sharing in teaching.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 19, 2:51 PM

This inventory, published by the University of British Columbia was developed by an impressive team from Canada, headed by Nobel Prize winning physicist Carl Wieman.  Fine research. Deep and worth the dive.

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EduGeek Journal » Ed Tech Retro-Futurism

EduGeek Journal » Ed Tech Retro-Futurism | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Every time I read someone’s tag line or bio that self-describes themselves as an “ed tech futurist”, I chuckle a little inside. Since time only seems to move forward (as far as we can tell), aren’t we all a little bit of a futurist inside? I mean, besides thinking about what we will eat next or if we will be at the same job next year, don’t we all pay some attention to the future of technology? Whether its the next phone we want or what we want to our apps do in the future, I think we all have a futurist in us. Might as well say “I’m an oxygen-breathing human.”

Maybe its a way to say that you are trying to shape the future, or predict the future, or something along those lines. But wouldn’t that make you more of an ed tech fortune teller?

Maybe it’s just me, but every time I read about the future of ed tech, I seem to just see a newer, fancier way of getting dogs to drool when a bell rings. And I admit, I’ll be the first dog in line to drool over the Occulus Rift or anything else, but has anyone else noticed that all of the coolest tech toys are really just finding more and more realistic ways to recreate this thing we already have called “reality”? Can we just be honest about Occulus Rift and call it “Your Own Eyes 2.0″, or call 3-D printing “Stuff 2.0″?

In many ways, we haven’t as much come up with new ways to teach as much as new toys to make Pavolov’s dog happy. Its like we want to completely ignore the Clark/Kozma debate and say “Google Education will revolutionize education more than MOOCs ever did!” or something along those lines.

That’s why I tend to focus on ideas and philosophy more than gadgets and websites these days. We still haven’t gotten to a point that we are implementing some of the last truly new ideas we had from Skinner to Vygotsky to even people like Foucault and Habermas in education in transformative ways…. even though we know that they often work better than behaviorism does in many instances. No wonder we are still resistant to ideas like connectivism and heutagogy – we never got past cognitivism and pedagogy.
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