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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Inside the School Silicon Valley Thinks Will Save Education

Inside the School Silicon Valley Thinks Will Save Education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
But what are they betting on? AltSchool is a decidedly Bay Area experiment with an educational philosophy known as student-centered learning. The approach, which many schools have adopted, holds that kids should pursue their own interests, at their own pace. To that, however, AltSchool mixes in loads of technology to manage the chaos, and tops it all off with a staff of forward-thinking teachers set free to custom-teach to each student. The result, they fervently say, is a superior educational experience.

Via Peter Mellow
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#ContentStrategy #MOOC - Week 5

#ContentStrategy #MOOC - Week 5 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A suggestion was made in one of the videos that when crafting marketing material for our content that we should consider tapping into Maslows Hierachy of Needs and weave them into the comms.

Basic physiological needs: Appeal to the users sense of safety. We want to be part of group, we dont want to be left behind. Use phrases such as join others etc

Psychological needs: Use phrases such as keep up with your peers, find out what your competitors are looking at etc
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Carly Fiorina: 85-95% Of What We Do Online Is Superficial And Useless

Carly Fiorina: 85-95% Of What We Do Online Is Superficial And Useless | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
 Former HP CEO and current presidential candidate Carly Fiorina took the stage at Disrupt NY today to talk about her campaign, experience at HP and the role of technology in politics.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Learning and teaching technology options: Study

Technology is expected to revolutionize education by, for example, blurring the barriers between teachers and students, increasing access to high quality contents developed collaboratively or making personalised and ubiquitous education a reality. However, although progress has been made, this revolution is happening at a slower pace than anticipated.


Via Cristóbal Suárez, Rui Guimarães Lima
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6 eLearning Lessons We Learned from a Galaxy Far Far Away...

6 eLearning Lessons We Learned from a Galaxy Far Far Away... | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In honor of May the Fourth, we sat down and watched all the Star Wars we could sit through. During that potato chip fueled marathon, it dawned on us that many of the characters in this classic series have some great perspectives on eLearning.

“Size matters not.”

A course doesn’t have to be an hour long if you don’t have an hour of material to fill it.
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What's the Future for Mobile Devices in the Classroom? [#Infographic]

What's the Future for Mobile Devices in the Classroom? [#Infographic] | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A new survey on mobile learning from Project Tomorrow shows that today's schools are relying increasingly on students having experience with devices like smartphones and tablets to engage in modern curriculum.

Project Tomorrow's 12th annual Speak Up Research Project surveyed teachers and students at more than 8,000 schools and 2,600 school districts to gain insight on how these devices are affecting education. The results were adapted into a report and an infographic.

Key findings from the survey include:

45 percent of surveyed administrators say blended learning initiatives have yielded positive results

27 percent of surveyed high school principals say they are not yet offering online courses

24 percent of surveyed students say they would prefer if all their courses were online

Nearly 75 percent of surveyed students say that "every student should be able to use a mobile device during the school day for learning."
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Self-Directed Learning: The Core of Successful MOOC Participation

Self-Directed Learning: The Core of Successful MOOC Participation | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
As MOOCs continue to develop, we must identify challenges learners face as MOOC participants, specifically for learners accustomed to the face-to-face classroom—many of them disengage in MOOCs as the course progresses because online education has shifted the learner’s role into unfamiliar territory: online students are now more accountable for their own learning, time management, and motivation to complete coursework.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 27, 7:02 PM

Self-directed learning is the answer... is the question Why Moocs?

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How to learn with zero effort

How to learn with zero effort | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What is the easiest way to learn? David Robson meets a group of scientists and memory champions competing to find techniques that make facts stick... fast.

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, May 3, 8:12 PM

Interesting article from the BBC. 

Ivo Nový's curator insight, May 4, 10:19 AM

Impressive tactics and strategies that can rapidly increase your memory potential.

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Siemens-Downes debate - The Linearity of Stephen Downes. Or a tale of two Stephens

Siemens-Downes debate - The Linearity of Stephen Downes. Or a tale of two Stephens | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

by George Siemens

 

With academic pickup artistry and my motivations foregrounded, I’ll turn to Stephen’s assertions.

"It has in recent years been engaged in a sustained attack on the very idea of the MOOC and alternative forms of learning not dependent on the traditional model of the professor, the classroom, and the academic degree. It is resisting, for good reason, incursions from the commercial sector into its space, but as a consequence, clinging to antiquated models and approaches to research."

This get at the heart of views that Stephen and I have discussed on numerous occasions. I believe in the value of the professoriate. In this instance, he is Illich to my Friere. As I interpret Stephen’s work, he would like to see all learning opportunities and control shift to the individual and sees limited value in the higher education system that is as much about preserving faculty positions as it is about preserving the academy. Stephen and I both resist commercialization of education but vary in how we want to see the university of the future. Stephen wants a university model without universities. This comes, I believe, from his unfortunate experiences in doing his phd where his supervisory panel played a hard heavy hand in determining what is and isn’t research that they valued. I’m sure his experience isn’t unique.

Faculty can be stunning idiots when it comes to preserving and perpetuating their egos. The pursuit of knowledge and advocacy for equity often takes a seat to ego and the goal building a faculty “mini me” who is expected to pick up a research stream done by a panel or department and toe the line. In contrast to Stephen’s views, I love universities. I want a future of more, not less, universities. Universities are not perfect, but they are the best model that we currently have to enable individuals to improve their position in life and a power structure that exists to counter and comment on the corporate and government power structures. Can these goals be realized by networks of individuals (i.e. the second superpower)? If the world was populated with primarily Stephens, then it might be possible. For many people, however, education is not a goal in itself, but rather a means to employment. Systems are needed to preserve and perpetuate the highest ideals of society. If left to chance, then the views of the most aggressive will become the norm. While society slept, many of the wealthiest were busy creating a tax system that preserved their resources and created inequity. In the past, unions existed to serve as an organizing structure to advocate for the rights of individual works. Stephen would argue that we could today do this organizing and democracy preserving work through networks. I agree that networks are important, but argue that institutions are a type of network that has been configured to better meet these needs. Some structure is needed. Perhaps not as much as we see today in universities, but a minimum level or organization is required in order to provide learning opportunities to society’s disenfranchised. Simply giving people access is not enough. Social, scaffolded, and structured support is needed.

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4 Key Emerging Trends in LMS | The Upside Learning Blog

4 Key Emerging Trends in LMS | The Upside Learning Blog | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
More than 2 years back, I had carried out a SWOT analysis of the LMS to get some understanding on the LMS scenario. Today, after the rapid evolution of the LMS – hastened by several factors, right from the inclusion of social learning tools, to an ever increasing need for usability – many things have changed, and still continue to change, in the LMS. The question then is, how will the LMS of the future look like? While there is no knowing for sure what will happen over the next 3 – 5 years, there are some key trends that may find a prominent place in the evolution of the LMS in the coming time.
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The Four Negative Sides of Technology

The Four Negative Sides of Technology | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There can be a negative side resulting from inappropriate or overuse of technology, and that negative side can have serious and long-term consequences.

 

Negative #1: Technology Changes the Way Children ThinkNegative #2: Technology Changes the Way Children FeelNegative #3: Technology Can Put Privacy and Safety at RiskNegative #4: More Use of Technology with Less Physical Activity Leads to Obesity
Via Juergen Wagner
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More thoughts on artificial intelligence and human learning | Tony Bates

More thoughts on artificial intelligence and human learning | Tony Bates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Man shoots computer

I have a new hero and his name is Lucas Hinch. Frustrated with his Dell PC, he took it into the street in Colorado Springs and shot it eight times. The police were summoned and later in court his firearm was confiscated, but Hinch is reported as saying: ‘It was worth it. It was glorious. Angels sung on high.’
Ex Machina

I have just seen a very good new movie, Ex Machina, which is about Nathan, a carefully selected young company program developer charged with Turing-testing, i,.e. evaluating the capabilities, and ultimately the consciousness, of an alluring female robot called AVA. AVA features artificial intelligence developed mainly by structuring search engine data and is designed by Caleb, the reclusive CEO of a large Internet search engine company.

Now this is a movie, and a very good one, so it has to be entertaining and in movies, anything is possible, but it is worth seeing because of the intelligent script and in particular the interaction between both Nathan and the robot, and between Nathan and Caleb, where they discuss the nature and the (possible) potential of AI.
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High-Tech Wildlife (Infographic)

High-Tech Wildlife (Infographic) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Why are sea turtles’ shells dome-shaped? How much can an adult sea turtle weigh? You’ll discover the answers to these questions, along with many others


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Flipped #eMOOCs2015 conference videos via EdX course

Flipped #eMOOCs2015 conference videos via EdX course | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
...Spreading the official words on the Flipped conference MOOC option:MOOCs are opening up new opportunities for faculty members to flip their classrooms. Can we apply this educational innovation to scientific conferences by flipping the conference room? By bringing these principles from the academic field to the scientific context, EMOOCs 2015 seeks to evolve and challenge traditional conference organization...http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc
Via Lucas Gruez
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The Course Hath No Bottom: the 20,000-Person Seminar

There has been much pontificating about MOOCs. Much discussion of the ifs and whys and whethers. There has been decidedly less practical discussion of how we might make better MOOCs. There has been little discussion about what the MOOC can teach us about learning. And I don’t mean what we can learn from machines, from big data, from so-called “objective” or “quantifiable” research. I don’t mean what we can learn from IRB-authorized participant surveys or some other “study” that proves what is proven already through plain observation. Instead, we need more deeply subjective work on MOOCs. Many of us don’t have time for the years that can pass in legitimizing the double-blind-peer-reviewed claims of an academic article. The folks for whom this work can do the most good are designing and taking courses right now, this week, not in two years. What can we learn from (and with) them?

The bulk of the MOOCs I’ve taken or eavesdropped upon have not been particularly well-designed. And I find this equally true of the connectivist MOOCs I’ve encountered and the ones from silicon-valley MOOC-providers like Coursera and Udacity. The problem is not that the MOOC is experimental but that it is often not experimental enough. The MOOC landscape has been cut up into neat and tidy categories, and too many MOOCs conform to pre-established scripts. Most Coursera MOOCs, for example, look identical to traditional online courses circa 2005 or earlier, and efforts to scale up those courses has meant more content and less attention to interaction. Coursera is a triumph of marketing a decade-old approach to online learning, not a triumph of design.

I say this, and yet I am just now teaching a MOOC on Coursera and have been more often than not delighted by the elegance of the platform — especially the stark lack of feature bloat I’ve seen infect almost every other learning management system I’ve worked within.
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MOOC 4.0: The Next Revolution in Learning and Leadership

MOOC 4.0: The Next Revolution in Learning and Leadership | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

... Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have evolved over the past three years. This is how we think about their evolution:

MOOC 1.0 - One-to-Many: Professor lecturing to a global audience
MOOC 2.0 - One-to-One: Lecture plus individual or small-group exercises 
MOOC 3.0 - Many-to-Many: Massive decentralized peer-to-peer teaching. 
MOOC 4.0 - Many-to-One: Deep listening among learners as a vehicle for sensing one's highest future possibility through the eyes of others...


Via Lucas Gruez
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Patricia Randeynes's curator insight, Today, 4:25 AM

Interesting approach! Thank you

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#rhizo15 Week 3 - Content is people

What most people are concerned with is its quality – the net impact of content on the receiver (which could be a network). Other assessments include factors such as its development or delivery cost, coverage and ease of use. It also predicates a level of competency of the receiver(s) to be able to “effectively” consume that content.

The fact is that content is really some of all these things, not just any one. Nor are people the only way “stories” are created or transmitted (or there would be no history or even lived experience). Nor are they the only starting point. The fact is that we learn also from nature, interactions with machines and man-made processes & objects.

In sharing openly what we have learned, we personify that content or our interpretation of it. Others may then consume this personified content to (as Dave said) function in the field.

Perhaps if we think of content as people, we may also be susceptible to the mind as machine metaphors. Would we rather think of content as network as a more appropriate metaphor?

 

 

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Effective Social Media Practices and Good Online Teaching

Effective Social Media Practices and Good Online Teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Blog: Technology and LearningI have this theory that if you are effective on social media then you stand a good chance of being effective in online teaching. How do these two activities go together? 
 
Two words: presence and community.

 

The goal to invest in presence and achieve community are also the two hallmarks of effective online teaching. If you teach online you need be present. This does not mean answering every single discussion thread, or constantly putting up just-in-time videos to explain concepts. Rather, presence can take the form of active listening. Of knowing when it is time to contribute, when it is time to guide, and when it makes more sense to step back and let the conversation play out. Effective online teaching is vastly time consuming. It takes a commitment to concerted and focused effort to effectively facilitate an online class. The best online courses develop a close-knit and trusting community feel. Faculty cannot guarantee that an energetic and positive learning community will develop in an online class, but they can take steps to move the class towards that goal.  The most important step is to state the development of a learning community up-front in the course objectives, and then to design the assignments and interactions in a way that fosters that community.


Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Get Them Hooked: 6 Tips To Improve Learner Retention In eLearning Courses And Avoid Drop-Outs

Get Them Hooked: 6 Tips To Improve Learner Retention In eLearning Courses And Avoid Drop-Outs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Throughout my many years in the eLearning industry, I’ve encountered a variety of eLearning courses that experienced a dramatic decline in learner retention rates. Despite the fact that eLearning professionals develop their eLearning courses with great care and do everything in their power to promote and manage them, for one reason or another they are still noticing ever-rising drop-out statistics.

The real problem that is hindering their success is not what they are actually doing after launching the eLearning course, but rather what they’ve missed during the eLearning design and development process. You see, in order to improve the rate of learner retention in eLearning you have to get them hooked from the very beginning. Your eLearning course has to grab their interest and maintain it throughout the eLearning experience. In this article, I’ll share insight and advice on how to avoid drop-outs and design eLearning courses that engage and enlighten your learners from the very first screen.

 

1. Clearly define benefits and expectations beforehand.
2. Have a well-structured support system in place.
3.  Encourage online collaboration with peers.

4. Provide self-study activities.

5. Cater to a wide range of learning needs.

6. Break down eLearning courses into more manageable lessons or modules.

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Terwiesch Ulrich Threat and Opportunity of MOOCs for MBA Programs


Via Peter Mellow
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Instructional Design Basics for Online Learning - Full Tilt Ahead: Education Technology and Online Learning

Instructional Design Basics for Online Learning - Full Tilt Ahead: Education Technology and Online Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Instructional Design & Online Learning | Full Tilt Ahead

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Personalised Learning - An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief - 2015

In this NMC Strategic Brief, we will place these new developments in context, and attempt to make clear  that  personalisation  begins  and  ends  with  the  relationship  between  teacher  and  student, between mentor and mentee, between the learner and what is to be learned.  While the range of options  available  to  teachers,  schools,  parents and  students  has expanded  enormously,  the  end result is, as it always has been, to give every child the support and the tools to be successful.


Via Ebba Ossiannilsson
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Every Teacher’s Guide to Assessment

Every Teacher’s Guide to Assessment | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
It’s not a stretch to say that assessment is a hot button issue in education; however, you’d be hard pressed to find an educator who doesn’t see the value in measuring student progress. Assessments themselves have been vilified, when, in fact, it’s why assessments are given and how the data is used that is really the issue. The Glossary of Education Reform gives this great overview of what high-stakes testing is and how it impacts students, teachers, and schools. Basically, high-stakes testing has consequences for the test-takers and givers—sometimes in the form of a high school diploma, grade advancement, and even teachers’ salaries. But not all assessment is high-stakes, and when done thoughtfully, the right assessment can provide extremely useful information for all stakeholders—students, teachers, parents, schools, and policy-makers

Let’s take a look at what assessment is, why it’s important, and how it can be delivered in the classroom in a useful manner. Then we’ll dive into some resources available for each type of assessment—diagnostic, formative, and summative.

Via John Evans
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How Do Tech Tools Affect the Way Students Write?

How Do Tech Tools Affect the Way Students Write? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Many teachers reported that students are more willing to offer feedback and advice to peers through a shared document. And they approach the writing process more fluidly. “I have seen students more willing to go back and revise or improve their work in order to provide more clarity when using digital tools than when they are writing it on paper,” a teacher said.

At the same time, the ubiquitous presence of technology and the dominant ways students use it have had some negative impacts on writing. Teachers report that students blend formal and informal writing, often having trouble choosing a deliberate writing “voice” or “register” based on audience. And as the digital tools push for truncated communication, teachers report that in some cases students struggle to write longer, more complex pieces. But writing formally is still important to teachers; 92 percent of those surveyed replied that “formal writing” is an essential skill for students to learn; while 91 percent said “writing effectively” is essential.

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