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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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AN APPROACH TO GLOBAL NETIQUETTE RESEARCH

ABSTRACT The user base of the Internet is today more diverse than ever. People with different cultural backgrounds may have very different views on some crucial Internet-related matters, such as the regulation of the Internet, the responsibility of an individual in the Internet, copyright issues, issues of anonymity, and so forth. Differing opinions on these matters have already roused heated debates. Although there are a number of local codes of conduct for proper behavior on the Internet, and although countries have set laws and regulations concerning the net, there are almost no studies on the set of rules that would be commonly agreed on by all users of the Internet, in all their cultural diversity. In this paper we propose a study that will be based on established qualitative, anthropological methods, and that aims at finding a commonly agreed core set of rules for appropriate use of the Internet.

 

KEYWORDS Netiquette; Global Netiquette; Multicultural Web Communities; Cultural Dialogue


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, Today, 5:40 PM

The authors define Netiquette as, "In this paper we use the term netiquette to mean a body of conventions and manners for using the Internet as a tool for communication or data exchange, practiced or advocated by a group of people. In this sense, netiquette includes laws, regulations, as well as good manners and practices."


The idea of a Global Netiquette is intriguing.  

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Meet Learner 2.0 | Learning with 'e's

Meet Learner 2.0 | Learning with 'e's | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Brisbane for EduTech next week, and the theme for my talk is 'Meet Learner 2.0'. I want my audience of mainly higher education teachers to think about the cohort of students that is now coming through the doors of universities. Generally they are young people who have no memory of the last century (the one we were all brought up and educated in), and have been immersed in technology their entire lives. They are younger than the Internet and mobile phones, and they don't recall a time when there was no Google or Facebook. They are residents in the digital age and they carry their connection with them wherever they go. This results in a number of repercussions for education.

We are witnessing a shift in education that is likely to be profound. It is a shift in the roles of teachers and learners, and it is one that will alter the relationships we are familiar with. The shift is occurring in the responsibility that learners are adopting to learn for themselves. Teachers have long been advised to become 'guides on the side' so that learners can take responsibility. From Socrates through to Dewey, far sighted and progressive philosophers and theorists have consistently argued that students learn better when they lead their own discovery. But very few educators ever took up this challenge, preferring instead to remain 'in control' of the process of education, the expert sage taking centre stage. The advent of digital technology challenges this traditional model of education.
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New Facebook Study Reveals Psychological Motivation Behind Status Updates

New Facebook Study Reveals Psychological Motivation Behind Status Updates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A new study has reinforced what many already suspected – people who constantly post Facebook status updates about their relationships are insecure, while people who post about their gym sessions and healthy meals are egotistical.

The research, conducted by Brunel University in London, suggests that those who are insecure regularly post updates about their relationship status in order to garner attention, and likes, in order to disctract from their own feelings of insecurity. Conversely, egotists tend to post about their achievements in order to get the boost of likes and comments, reinforcing their sense of self. In this sense, the Facebook eco-system can form a sort of validation for personality traits and types.

So is this a good thing? Should we be validating egotism by through the endorsement of Likes and comments? Do we really ‘like’ such updates, or do we simply interact with them as a form of support? Such questions formed the basis for this research, and frame the greater context around the psychology of Facebook and what it means in a wider sense.

An Influential Relationship

In a previous, and controversial, study, Facebook researchers found that by manipulating the News Feeds of users, they were able to affect the moods of the users themselves. The data scientists restricted the content shown to more than 689,000 users, removing either positive or negative updates from their feeds in order to see how those actions influenced the content posted by the affected parties. The result? The study found that the inputs people received, via their News Feeds, did, absolutely, affect their moods. People were outraged when the results were made public, with many criticising Facebook for actively manipulating the emotional states of their users – users whom they could not possible know the emotional states of. What if they’d brought down the mood of someone who was already depressed?

The potential dangers of such experiments are frightening, but in a wider context, the study showed just how powerful The Social Network had become. Not only is it where 936 million people log-in daily to get the latest updates from friends and family, it’s also become one of our main media inputs, influencing how we think, see and act. It’s that influence that has Facebook positioned as one of the most powerful media players in the world, the keeper of the biggest trove of audience data in our history – but it also positions the network in an unprecedented position of influence, and one which could be abused.

Psychological Interpretation

Does it matter if we know the background, the why, of why users post certain things on Facebook? It’s of interest, of course, many users see positive updates from friends, like a positive relationship status update, and they’ll invariably compare their own scenario to the poster, often times negatively. We’ve all experienced this in some way, seeing how well other people are doing and comparing our own situation in a ‘grass is always greener’ type scenario. This latest research underlines that Facebook updates are not necessarily 100% reflective of the reality of a situation. People post in order to get a reaction – people post about their health regimen in order to get positive reinforcement, about their relationships because they crave support. While to the plain observer it may seem that these people have it all, it’s important to consider that everyone posts selectively, what you’re seeing is not necessarily an all-inclusive documentation of that users’ life.

The key element of this is, don’t take it all to heart. Don’t compare yourself to the lives of other based on their Facebook activity – it’s unfair to you and unrealistic for them. Recognise that there’s often more meaning to such updates than what you may see on the surface.
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Web-Based Course Assessment Tool with Direct Mapping to Student Outcomes


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Blended Learning in Finland


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Official AndreasCY, Luciana Viter, Peter Mellow
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Continuous learning : it’s a mindset not a technology or product

Continuous learning : it’s a mindset not a technology or product | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

In this fast-moving world, we constantly need to learn new stuff. In the workplace, this is particularly important, as I showed in an earlier blog post, where Jacob Morgan talks of the future employee moving from “knowledge worker” (knowing stuff) to “learning worker” (learning new stuff).

So how can organisations support continuous learning at work?

1. It doesn’t mean creating more training or e-learning and force-feeding it to people. It means encouraging and supporting individuals to continuously learn for themselves.

 

2. It doesn’t mean trying to manage everyone’s learning for them – and trying to track it all in a LMS, It means everyone taking responsibility for their own learning, and managers measuring success in terms of job and team performance.

Of course, many individuals are already doing this – as a natural part of who they are – and that is what is giving them a personal competitive edge at work (as well as in life). They are always aware of what they learning, they seek out new opportunities to do so, and they share their thoughts (often in their blogs).

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New Teachers: Designing Learning Environments

New Teachers: Designing Learning Environments | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Why does the physical design of classrooms matter? Mark Phillips discusses this question in "A Place for Learning: The Physical Environment of Classrooms" and offers examples of and resources for turning impersonal spaces into student-friendly havens of learning. For further inspiration, VideoAmy has compiled some videos to help you begin to conceptualize your classroom vision in "Five-Minute Film Festival: Classroom Makeovers." Be sure to take a look at the resource list at the end of her post.

Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, May 24, 3:51 PM

Don't miss the video that gives insight on how learners can redesign their learning environments.For new teachers, this resource compilation includes tips and guides on classroom design and layout to help maximize the possibilities of the learning environment.

Norton Gusky's curator insight, Today, 7:15 AM

A Series of Great Ideas from Edutopia. 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Effective Education
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Are we raising mean kids?

Are we raising mean kids? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

When was the last time you made an effort to teach empathy or kindness to your child? Sudha Subramanian says it’s about time parents got their act together.

 

A recent study suggested that parents are happy only if their kids are high achievers. We are all too wired and focused about our children getting top grades and excelling in activities. We don’t pay any attention to whether our kids are kind or not. We don’t take that extra effort to teach our children empathy or encourage them to do any community service.

 

Which means our kids may become high achievers in terms of grades, but may not have much to show by way of being a caring human being. And this brings us to the big question – are we raising mean kids?


Via Edwin Rutsch, Jocelyn Stoller, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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27 Presentation Software & Powerpoint Alternatives For 2015

27 Presentation Software & Powerpoint Alternatives For 2015 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
At CustomShow, we decided to list some powerpoint alternatives that could help solve your overall presentation software problems. These programs serve many purposes.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Can critical thinking be taught?

Can critical thinking be taught? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

We all know that we need critical thinking to do well in university. But what is critical thinking exactly? We all know that critical thinking is tested in assignments and exams. But more importantly what is the best way to teach critical thinking?

 

Like creativity, critical thinking is an often misunderstood form of thinking. Common perception is that critical thinking stems from initiative, interest and focus. It is something that smart people do when you challenge them with difficult situations. One misconception is that critical thinking cannot be taught.

 

Critical thinking is in fact a thinking habit involving the steps below that would hopefully result in a solution to a problem:

 

1. Conceptualizing: identifying concepts i.e. the rules of the game
2. Applying: linking previous knowledge to current problem
3. Analyzing: breaking the problem down into different parts
4. Synthesizing: connecting the different parts of the problem

Critical thinking can be taught just like how you teach students habits such as not plagiarising and putting on a lab coat. It is a simple process of “practice-feedback-practice”.

 

If critical thinking cannot be taught, the million dollar question is, would it be fair to assess students for their critical thinking ability? In Outcome Based Education, all learning outcomes must be accompanied by teaching methods and assessment methods.

 

It is unfortunate that traditional education systems are more adept at transmitting knowledge compared to thinking habits. Often, educators assess critical thinking in assignment and exams, and hope that students acquire critical thinking along the way. In practice, tutorials are often the best platform for students to attempt problem solving, receive feedback and devise a better solution. 


Via Eric Chan Wei Chiang, Jocelyn Stoller
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Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, May 24, 8:09 AM

Critical thinking is an important thinking habit but it has its shortcomings. How can you improve something which is working perfectly fine i.e. when there is no problem? How would you know if there are better alternatives to solve a problem once you find a solution? To address this you need another thinking habit, creativity which can also be taught.

http://www.scoop.it/t/on-leaders-and-managers/?tag=Creativity

 

To truly create learning communities that promote critical thinking, a lot of candor is needed in the system.

http://www.scoop.it/t/on-leaders-and-managers/?tag=Candor

 

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10 Tips for Building a Strong Story

Need to improve your storytelling? Here are 10 tips to help your presentation.

Via Baiba Svenca
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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, May 24, 3:55 AM

This can serve as a guide to students who are learning how to build a presentation that has a strong backbone and impressive muscle.

Marco Favero's curator insight, May 24, 6:00 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Ruby Day's curator insight, Today, 2:48 AM

Basic tips, good resource for students. I like how it encourages building a script through practice as opposed to a written script 

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Want to Gain Expertise in Instructional Design? 4 Things You Need to Learn – An Infographic

Want to Gain Expertise in Instructional Design? 4 Things You Need to Learn – An Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Every Instructional designer needs to have good knowledge of standard instructional design models like ADDIE or Gagne’s nine events. These models facilitate the development of learner centric eLearning courses. But, it is not easy to remember all these concepts and apply them at the right instant of time to develop a successful eLearning course.

So, how can you overcome this problem?

Well, you need to concentrate on four things which will remind you of the ideas behind these principles and help you make good online courses.
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Harnessing the Power of a Subject Matter Expert (SME)

Harnessing the Power of a Subject Matter Expert (SME) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What happens when you have a Subject Matter Expert (SME) and an Instructional Designer (or an eLearning program developer) in one room?

You have a creative meeting that ends with a specific outline for the course, complete with interactivity nodes highlighted. And of course, a very confident instructional designer who knows the program would sell before it hit the shelves!!

This is because the material is both learner and organization centered, stemming from core objectives.

Without an SME, the eLearning content is as incomplete as a great website without accurate and current content! The goal here is not necessarily to create compelling content with smooth slide turner interactions, but to work with the expert in order to really spin the program towards a very time and cost efficient direction.
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Data integration made easy with open source Karma | Opensource.com

Data integration made easy with open source Karma | Opensource.com | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Karma is a free, open source tool that makes it easy to convert data from a variety of formats into linked data.

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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3 rules to spark learning

3 rules to spark learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

It took a life-threatening condition to jolt chemistry teacher Ramsey Musallam out of ten years of “pseudo-teaching” to understand the true role of the educator: to cultivate curiosity. In a fun and personal talk, Musallam gives 3 rules to spark imagination and learning, and get students excited about how the world works.

 

 


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Creative Commons Attribution license quick and awesome review

Creative common license pros and cons quick and awesome review. 


Via Anne Whaits
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Why You Need Emotional Intelligence to Succeed

Why You Need Emotional Intelligence to Succeed | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When emotional intelligence first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70% of the time.

Via Helen Teague
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Helen Teague's curator insight, May 24, 7:08 PM

By Dr. Travis Bradberry                                                                           "Emotional Intelligence is the "something" in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions that achieve positive results. Emotional intelligence is made up of four core skills that pair up under two primary competencies: personal competence and social competence."

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Self directed learning in trial future learn courses

Presentation on FutureLearn trial courses given at emoocs2015 in Mons, Belgium

Via Vladimir Kukharenko, Luciana Viter, Peter Mellow
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The Mobile Learning Landscape 2015 Infographic

The Mobile Learning Landscape 2015 Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Widespread adoption of smartphones and tablets has fuelled extensive interest among learning professionals about the use of mobile devices for training delivery. What is the state of mobile learning in 2015? Is growth underway? Are obstacles being surmounted only to give way to new stumbling blocks? Or is mobile learning accruing the sort of success stories learning professionals have hoped to see?

To explore those questions and other elements of mobile learning, ATD and i4cp sought insights from learning leaders and professionals worldwide in The Mobile Landscape 2015: Building Toward Anytime, Anywhere Learning. Their views, experiences, and strategies offer valuable guidance and examples for those just beginning the mobile learning journey.

ATD and i4cp found that 34 percent of organizations have mobile learning programs. Even among organizations not actively leveraging mobile learning, interest in its potential has—and does—run high. The numbers of learning professionals with mobile programs in development or under serious consideration have consistently matched figures for those in use.
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Eunice Sari's curator insight, May 24, 10:28 PM

The change in mobile learning landscape revolutionizes education.

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13 Signs You’re A Pretty Quick Learner

13 Signs You’re A Pretty Quick Learner | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

According to a study it is discovered that fast learners (specifically language learners) have more white matter and less symmetrical brains. Learning fast or being a quick learner depends on how we use our brains. Sometimes what seem so sophisticated needs the simplest solution. Here is how to know if you are a pretty quick learner.

 

1. You are not afraid to say “I don’t know”2. You use the Pareto principle3. You are able to visualize it4. You simplify5. You take action6. You are selective7. You use Parkinson’s Law8. You know when to stop9. You know how to anticipate the future10. You understand that many questions have no answers11. You can explain it to a kid12. You are positive13. You can seek the opinions of experts
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Joy Chien's curator insight, May 24, 4:44 PM

I used to have a nickname, "the questioning child", because I constantly bothered my siblings by asking them "Why?" and my most common answers to questions from my probing neighbors were always "I don't know."

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Education 2.0 & 3.0
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How Games Help Students Learn and Teachers Teach Infographic

How Games Help Students Learn and Teachers Teach Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The How Games Help Students Learn and Teachers Teach Infographic illustrates the benefits of games on teachers as well as children.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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PhD: is the doctoral thesis obsolete?

PhD: is the doctoral thesis obsolete? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, examined a PhD candidate at Imperial College London. Although the student “sailed through”, Farrar was struck by how much time he had spent writing up his thesis compared with carrying out experiments.

“Is it time to look at the PhD thesis?” he wondered aloud on Twitter. “What is best for candidate and research in the 21st century?”

He estimates that the average doctoral student spends about six months of their four-year programme writing their thesis, and another three “waiting for it to be examined”.

“That is just not a wise balance,” he says – particularly when even examiners rarely have the time to “wade through” theses in their entirety.

“An awful lot is going unused and unread,” he says. “Is this really appropriate for the modern world? Communication within the science world and with the public is becoming shorter and snappier, yet our PhDs still seem to be stuck in the 1960s.”
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What do successful students have in common?

What do successful students have in common? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

It is about discipline. Conscientious people are disciplined about achieving goals. High levels of open-mindedness relate to curiosity and acceptance of new ideas. Someone with both traits approaches challenges with a determined yet flexible attitude. In other words: They try and try again.

 

Poropat said his findings, published in August’s Learning and Individual Differences, have surprised other psychologists, who have trouble consciously uncoupling intelligence and academic success. Teachers, however, don’t bat an eye. Educators can more easily distinguish personality traits that other people might associate with intelligence. Openness is a good example. How often do intellectual voracity and high intellect not overlap?

 

“We intuitively think that [openness and intelligence] ought to go together,” said Poropat. “But what it seems to be is that they’re not the same thing, and what matters is how one apply these qualities — if you’re not interested in deep learning, no one’s ever going to see the extent of your intelligence.”

 

Being born brilliant doesn’t cut it. Poropat’s work lends statistical support to a school of thought embraced by researchers and thinkers who want to redefine the relationship between success and intelligence, both in the classroom and in the workplace.

People either have a fixed mindset or a growth mindset, according to Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck, who frames intelligence as a quality that can be enhanced through persistent effort. While those with fixed mindsets believe success hinges on innate, unchanging ability — you have it or you don’t — people with growth mindsets implicitly see intelligence as something to hone. As a result, they care less about seeming smart and more readily flirt with failure, an attitude that primes them for success.

 

 


Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Intelligent Structured Content

Intelligent Structured Content | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We need a true single-source method that would enable learning developers to author content in one place and publish into the various materials they will share with learners. In addition, the ideal solution would be able to interpret and make connections between different pieces of content. Enter Intelligent Structured Content.
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“Waiting for Carnot”: Information and complexity

The relationship between information and complexity is analyzed using a detailed literature analysis. Complexity is a multifaceted concept, with no single agreed definition. There are numerous approaches to defining and measuring complexity and organization, all involving the idea of information. Conceptions of complexity, order, organization, and “interesting order” are inextricably intertwined with those of information. Shannon's formalism captures information's unpredictable creative contributions to organized complexity; a full understanding of information's relation to structure and order is still lacking. Conceptual investigations of this topic should enrich the theoretical basis of the information science discipline, and create fruitful links with other disciplines that study the concepts of information and complexity.

 

“Waiting for Carnot”: Information and complexity
David Bawden and Lyn Robinson

Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Early View

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.23535


Via Complexity Digest, Jocelyn Stoller
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