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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Deeper eLearning Design: Part 1 - The Starting Point: Good Objectives

Deeper eLearning Design: Part 1 - The Starting Point: Good Objectives | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
For a learning experience design to be truly effective, it has to have a focus. That focus is the outcome that the learning experience is designed to achieve. So, the starting point of a learning design has to be the objective that will achieve the outcome. And there are several issues involved.

Once we get the objective, we can start following a design process such as ADDIE or SAM, but to assume we’re ready to design a learning experience when we receive a request for a course is a mistake. In short, we need to be sure that a learning experience is indeed the answer. And while there are a number of other preliminary activities, which include understanding the audience, those are already fairly well understood. Here we focus on those deltas that will make a difference between just well-produced learning and well-designed learning.
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
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Higher education: Creative destruction

Higher education: Creative destruction | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Reinventing an ancient institution will not be easy. But it does promise better education for many more people. Rarely have need and opportunity so neatly come together.


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Should universities collect personal data to monitor their students? – live chat

Should universities collect personal data to monitor their students? – live chat | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Do universities need to know which books students have read? How often they come to class? Or even when they contact their tutors? Universities say they can gain valuable information by tracking students’ behaviour online. The data collected can be used to not only enhance the student experience, but also identify top resources and understand how students from different background learn best.
How universities are using data to stop students dropping out
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But should universities be spending money on tracking and monitoring how students choose to learn? Is it ethical? And does it actually improve the student experience?

One project set up by Nottingham Trent University looked at four factors that signal student engagement – library use, card swipes into buildings, VLE use and electronic submission of coursework – and then analysed the progression and attainment of particular groups such as male or female, widening participation or third year students. They discovered that if a first-year student’s average level of engagement is low, then they were less likely to perform well in second year.

Another scheme, Co-Tutor, created by researchers at Loughborough University identifies how often students and staff meet up. It also helps staff know when it might be best to intervene by flagging up students who miss important lectures.

Monitoring student behaviour, however, is often hard to do without using that data to monitor the behaviour of staff too. And there’s a concern that we are at risk of bombarding staff with data about their students without actually showing them what it all means, or how they can use it.

Join us on Friday 10 July with data experts and academics to talk about the pros and cons of surveilling students – and whether universities can be trusted not to misuse data. The debate will run from 12-2pm GMT in the comments section below. To take part, create a Guardian comment account.
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District tech leaders share 4 tips for device deployment success [ISTE 2015]

District tech leaders share 4 tips for device deployment success [ISTE 2015] | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In one of the first sessions Monday at ISTE 2015 in Philadelphia, a handful of tech chiefs from California — Robert Craven (Tustin Unified School District), Andrew Schwab (Union School District), Jim Klein (Las Virgenes Unified School District), and David Malone (San Francisco Unified School District) — gathered to share the ins and outs of putting a device in every student's hand. So what are the secrets to a successful device rollout?
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Learning design and learning analytics

Learning design and learning analytics: building the links EMMA Summer School, Ischia, July 2015

Via Peter Mellow
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3 Personalization Myths

3 Personalization Myths | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Personalization is all-the-rage across the country, and it's no small wonder. Until recently, personalizing student learning felt like a dream, but now, in an age where user-driven practices are the standard and where technology helps us function more effectively than ever before, personalization is feeling less and less like a dream, and more like a blissful reality.

Along with any dream, however, comes some unattainable and idealistic myths. While these myths make perfect sense, many of them deter teachers from even attempting to personalize learning, perpetuating the deep sleep of the one-size-fits-all approach. Are you one of those teachers dreaming of personalizing your classroom of thirty kids? Train your brain to break these three myths, and then get to personalizing!
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Moodle and Web 2.0
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6 browsers to change the way you surf the Web

6 browsers to change the way you surf the Web | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
These alternatives to Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Safari transform your Web surfing experience.

Via Mariano Fernandez S., Juergen Wagner
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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Why doesn’t everyone believe in God?: The skeptical brain may hold the answer

Why doesn’t everyone believe in God?: The skeptical brain may hold the answer | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Most Americans who grew up in religious households are still religious. But what about the ones who aren't?

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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The LMS of the Future: Exploring the Next Generation Digital Learning Environment

The LMS of the Future: Exploring the Next Generation Digital Learning Environment | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
If you could replace your current LMS with any application or platform you could imagine, what would it look like? Would it be much like what you have now, but with specific improvements and enhancements? Or would it be something totally out of the box, an entirely new approach?

Over the past six months, EDUCAUSE has been conducting research on that very question. Enabled by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the EDUCAUSE team solicited input from roughly 80 thought leaders from the higher education community, including faculty, academic technology staff, accessibility experts, and vendors. The team conducted interviews, convened brainstorming sessions and commissioned a special report from the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) on the current state of the LMS. We have summarized our findings in a recently released white paper.
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10 Lessons Learned from an Award-Winning Digital Badging Program

10 Lessons Learned from an Award-Winning Digital Badging Program | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
This week, I was invited to give a talk on digital badging at the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education’s (AACE) World Conference on Educational Media and Technology in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. (The conference had a significant amount of international participation.)

My presentation, Lessons Learned in Launching an Award-Winning Digital Badging Program, contains nuggets of wisdom that may be very helpful to your organization.

Whether you are exploring digital badging or getting ready to launch your own initiative, the ten lessons I shared are broadly applicable:
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Constructive Criticism in an Online Environment - OLC

Constructive Criticism in an Online Environment - OLC | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Most would agree that constructive criticism is good: it helps us grow. Most would also agree that constructive criticism is an integral part of the online educational process. Simply put, if you are a student who is not receiving constructive criticism concerning your writing, skills, thoughts, and ideas, then you are not getting a good return on your educational investment. If you are a faculty and you are not providing this type of feedback, you are not fulfilling your responsibilities as an educator.

So, why is constructive criticism so hard to give and even harder to take?

Whether you are pointing out someone’s weakness, or the one whose weaknesses are being exposed, criticism (constructive or not) can easily lead to an uncomfortable state. This is human nature. In an online environment, without nonverbal cues, it becomes even more difficult. For example, in a traditional setting an instructor explains to a student in a calm and encouraging voice (while making eye contact) how to revise a paper to meet the course learning outcomes. In the online environment such feedback is stripped of tone and body language and the student sees a paper (that cost family or work time to write) bathed in red, track changes marking most paragraphs, and comments cascading down the margin.

In an online setting, it is important to realize that feedback and grading are part of the education process. One of the chief functions of the faculty is to provide feedback on student work. This involves not only offering guidance and instructions to resources, but also suggestions on how to improve. Feedback also helps students perfect skills and knowledge. Anyone working or learning online should learn to love the feedback; and ask for more!
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 5, 9:43 AM

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College Students Unplugged: 24 Hours without Media Brings Feelings of Boredom, Isolation, Anxiety

College Students Unplugged: 24 Hours without Media Brings Feelings of Boredom, Isolation, Anxiety | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

College students who abstained from using media for 24 hours describe their feelings in terms more commonly associated with drug and alcohol addictions: Withdrawal, Frantically craving, Very anxious, Extremely antsy, Miserable, Jittery, Crazy.

A new study from the International Center for Media & the Public Agenda (ICMPA) at the University of Maryland, concludes that most college students are not just unwilling, but functionally unable to be without their media links to the world.

The ICMPA study, “24 Hours: Unplugged,” asked 200 students at the College Park campus to give up all media for 24 hours. After their 24 hours of abstinence, the students were then asked to blog on private class websites about their experiences. The 200 students wrote more than 110,000 words: in aggregate, about the same number of words as a 400-page novel.

“We were surprised by how many students admitted that they were ‘incredibly addicted’ to media,” noted the project director Susan D. Moeller, a journalism professor at the University of Maryland and the director of the International Center for Media and the Public Agenda which conducted the study. “But we noticed that what they wrote at length about was how they hated losing their personal connections. Going without media meant, in their world, going without their friends and family.”

 

 

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A University's Success with Flipped Learning Began by Phasing Out Lectures

A University's Success with Flipped Learning Began by Phasing Out Lectures | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
While some universities are wondering how to integrate online coursework into their classes, Adelaide University is actively phasing out lectures.

The growth of online classes has been seen across nearly every higher education institution across the country. In a keynote session at EDUCAUSE in October 2014, Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen said online learning would fundamentally change the role of universities in the near future.

Despite the changes on the horizon, the structure of most college courses has remained the same: stand-and-deliver instruction, also known as lectures, can be found at nearly every university in the country.

But the University of Adelaide's vice-chancellor Warren Bebbington told The Financial Review that "lecturers are obsolete."
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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The More You Connect, The Less You Connect

The More You Connect, The Less You Connect | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Shiyang he, a designer in advertising agency Ogilvy’s Beijing office, has created a series of ads for the Shenyang Center For Psychological Research, which highlight the detrimental effects smartphones can have on human relationships.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from 21st Century Information Fluency
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Zotero | Grab your research with a single click

Zotero | Grab your research with a single click | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Zotero collects all your research in a single, searchable interface. You can add PDFs, images, audio and video files, snapshots of web pages, and really anything else. Zotero automatically indexes the full-text content of your library, enabling you to find exactly what you're looking for with just a few keystrokes.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 6, 12:29 PM

I've used Diigo for years. Changes in the Diigo interface just aren't working for me so I'm ready to try some alternatives.  


This tool was recommended to me by one of my graduate students. I'm going to give it a go.  If any of you have tried this, let me know? 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Tools for Teachers & Learners
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Easy WebContent Presenter Brings HTML5 Design to the Masses

Easy WebContent Presenter Brings HTML5 Design to the Masses | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Today’s Internet is mobile and dynamic. Business owners and anyone who has ever edited a website understand that today’s consumers demand fast, sleek content available on any device.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 6, 5:11 AM

This looks like a useful tool for creating tablet friendly web content.

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Can Data Improve Education Without Compromising Privacy?

Can Data Improve Education Without Compromising Privacy? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The recent debate over the NSA’s surveillance policies shows just how much Americans care about privacy—perhaps on an unprecedented scale. “This is the power of an informed public,” Edward Snowden wrote of Congress’s decision this month to limit the agency’s data-collecting power. “With each court victory, with every change in the law, we demonstrate facts are more convincing than fear.”

But when it comes to the future of education in the United States, what if Americans’ privacy concerns are hindering the constructive use of data, from customized student learning to better teaching performance? That’s the tension behind a growing body of education research by private companies, academics, and nonprofits alike.

McKinsey’s Education Practice, for one, published an article in April that considered the pros and cons of data in schools. Citing an earlier McKinsey report, the authors argued that using student data could feed between $900 billion and $1.2 trillion into the global economy each year. More than $300 billion of that value could result from improved teaching, while other benefits could arise from more efficiently matching students to jobs and programs, estimating education costs, and allocating resources to schools, according to the report.
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Babies Can Form Abstract Relations Before They Even Learn Words

Babies Can Form Abstract Relations Before They Even Learn Words | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

According to a new study published in the journal Child Development, infants are capable of understanding abstract relations like ‘same’ and ‘different.’

 

“This suggests that a skill key to human intelligence is present very early in human development, and that language skills are not necessary for learning abstract relations,” said Dr Alissa Ferry of the Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati in Italy, lead author of the study.

 

To trace the origins of relational thinking in infants, Dr Ferry and her colleagues from Northwestern University tested whether 7-month-old infants could understand the simplest and most basic abstract relation – the same-different relation.

 

Infants were shown pairs of items that were either the same (two Elmo dolls) or different (Elmo doll and a toy camel) until their looking time declined.

 

In the test phase, the infants looked longer at pairs showing the novel relation, even when the test pairs were composed of new objects. That is, infants who had learned the same relation looked longer at test pairs showing the different relation during test, and vice versa.

 

This suggests that the infants had encoded the abstract relation and detected when the relation changed. “We found that infants are capable of learning these relations. Additionally, infants exhibit the same patterns of learning as older children and adults – relational learning benefits from seeing multiple examples of the relation and is impeded when attention is drawn to the individual objects composing the relation,” Dr Ferry said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Is 'Sesame Street' really as good as preschool? Let's ask a Nobel Prize winner

Is 'Sesame Street' really as good as preschool? Let's ask a Nobel Prize winner | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A report on "Sesame Street" got a lot of press saying the TV show is as good as preschool in improving academic achievement. Is it really?

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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True pedagogy

True pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Pedagogy is not about directing children. Nor is it, in Brennan's terms 'concerned with the work or art of being a teacher.' Those are mere glimpses of the reality, and only a part of a larger equation. In its absolute form, pedagogy is not just about teaching. It does not simply concern itself with the 'delivery' of education or content. In the truest sense, teaching is just one element of pedagogy and not the entire story. Pedagogy focuses on the learner and what they are capable of achieving. Previously I wrote about the origins of the word pedagogy, and how it can be appropriated into current practice. Pedagogy is about leading learners to the place of education. What does this mean for teachers today?

Pedagogy certainly doesn't require us to drip feed students with content and it is far removed from the harmful and relentless testing of children in schools. Much of the content you and I learnt, and were tested on in school was often lost from our memories days, or even hours after the exam. It is the deeper learning, formed through personal interest, experimentation and reflection, that remains. Pedagogy, when practised appropriately, is about creating environments in which students can learn for themselves, and pursue their curiosity. Pedagogy is about ensuring that students are motivated to succeed in their learning, and it is about providing them with the best possible tools, resources and contexts in which this can be realised.

Teachers have an important role to play in the pedagogical process, but they are often just the ignition point. Inspirational teachers are catalysts for lifelong learning, but they cannot do the learning for their students. Think back - which teachers inspired you to learn, and does their influence still inspire you today? And yet it was you who did the learning. It was you who made the effort to learn and to develop the skills and competencies you now own.

Pedagogy in the purest form describes the leading of students to a place where they can learn. In today's digital age, that learning can be any time, any place, and at a pace that suits each individual. Students already carry the tools to be able to do this. Banning these tools from the classroom has a similar effect to removing an artist's paint and brushes. A wiser decision would be for schools to explore safe, appropriate and effective use of mobile personal technologies to maximise learning. True pedagogy would recognise the opportunities that exist and exploit them. As teachers, we need to appreciate the diversity of learning opportunities that now afford themselves, and adapt our practices accordingly. That will mean standing back and letting students discover for themselves, monitoring their progress, and intervening when necessary.
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Why humans evolved to feel happiness

The creators of Pixar’s new film Inside Out weren’t just speculating when they broke human emotions into five distinct categories (and corresponding animated characters). The idea that we feel a limited number of emotions—joy, sadness, anger, fear, disgust, and possibly a few others—is grounded in scientific research.

To learn more about this spectrum, Fusion spoke with Dr. Dacher Keltner, a professor of psychology at UC Berkeley who the film’s creators consulted about the science of emotions. In this animated short, Keltner shares his insights on the unique nature of happiness—which, it turns out, is more altruistic than you might think.

 

 


Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG, Jocelyn Stoller
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ISTE 2015: 6 Tech Trends on Education's Horizon, 2015–2020

ISTE 2015: 6 Tech Trends on Education's Horizon, 2015–2020 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When the New Media Consortium (NMC) first announced this year’s projection on the future of K–12 technologies, it opened the presentation with a quote from science-fiction author William Gibson: “The future is already here — it’s just not very evenly distributed.”

The truth in this quote is evident in this year’s research, where tomorrow’s technologies are being used in schools across the world — but they have not been widely accepted yet.
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The Ultimate Guide to MOOCs

The Ultimate Guide to MOOCs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Professional and personal development are important to many people. Professional development allows you to stay current in your field, make connections with likeminded professionals, and satisfy any continuing learning requirements your job may have. Personal development allows you to grow as a person, learn new skills, and try new things.

In order to grow, professionally or personally, in the past, you had to sign up for college courses, pay a lot of money, and rush to class after work or on weekends. But that set-up as changed. Online courses, many of which are totally free, have revolutionized the way in which many people access professional and personal development. Thanks to the advent of massive open online courses (MOOCs), people can attend free courses offered by Stanford, Harvard, and MIT in the luxury of their own home, taking the courses at their own pace at a time that is convenient.
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 5, 9:43 AM

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Academic Assessment

Academic Assessment | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Learn how SCNM constantly measures and analyzes student learning to improve the education we provide to naturopathic medical students.

Via Julie Tardy
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Social Media Usage Trends Among Higher Education Faculty

Social Media Usage Trends Among Higher Education Faculty | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn all have their strengths and weaknesses, and each are better used for some things than others. But how are the three being used in higher education today? It’s our hope that these survey results provide at least some of the answers while lending new data to the discussion.

Here are just some of the findings from Social Media Usage Trends Among Higher Education Faculty, a 2011 Faculty Focus survey of nearly 900 higher education professionals:

* Facebook is the most popular social media site for the people who took this survey. Nearly 85 percent have a Facebook account, following by LinkedIn at approximately 67 percent and Twitter at around 50 percent.
* Thirty-two percent have “friended” an undergraduate student on Facebook; 55 percent said they wait until after the student graduates.
* Eighty-three percent allow students to use laptops in the classroom; 52 percent allow smart phones.
* Thirty percent said their institution doesn’t have a social media policy. About 40 percent weren’t sure.
* Sixty-eight percent have talked to their students about managing their online reputation.

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