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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 5:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 12:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 11:58 AM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 9:22 AM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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10 free tools for creating infographics | Creative Bloq

10 free tools for creating infographics | Creative Bloq | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

...The only problem is, infographics that look like they were simple to make are often anything but. Creating something beautiful and instantly understandable in Photoshop is often beyond the limits that time allows. Which is why it's occasionally useful to use a quick and dirty infographics tool to speed up the process.


We've selected our favourites here. They're all free, or offer free versions. Let us know which ones you get on best with...


Via Jeff Domansky, Jim Lerman
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JBass Learning's curator insight, August 21, 3:50 PM

Some really useful looking tools 

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 22, 1:26 AM

I know nothing about this but it looks like a good starting point...:-)))

Luis Cano's curator insight, August 23, 1:02 PM

Herramientas de Infograficas ...

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10 Things Every College Professor Hates

10 Things Every College Professor Hates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Your professors are not your friends.

 

I reached out to my network and collected some things that really get on instructors’ nerves. Here are the results: some of the “don’ts” for how to interact with your professor or teaching assistant. For what it’s worth, No. 2 was by far the most common complaint.



Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, September 1, 12:04 PM

Here are some great tips for students. This might make a good way to begin a discussion on the first day of class. 

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Impressive Ed, Actual Recess ---and no Homework in Finland

Impressive Ed, Actual Recess ---and no Homework in Finland | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The world could learn a lot from you, Finland

Via Helen Teague
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Helen Teague's curator insight, August 31, 7:42 AM

~Teacher-student ratios differ by 50% from the U.S.

~U.S. students take 100 million standardized tests per year--lots of time spent prepping for test vs. deep learning of content

~Interestingly, recess is utilized and is of a longer duration in Finland.

Link to website: http://themetapicture.com/why-theres-no-homework-in-finland/

Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, August 31, 11:06 PM

a beautiful (clear, on the point, ...) image of what we should do! In Europe and in our Country! 

Who will tell this to Mr. Renzi and his Education&Research Minister?

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15 Visual Content Tools That Rock

15 Visual Content Tools That Rock | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Where visual content comes in, is by providing the reader with a visual cue which jogs the brain into making a new connection. This connection links the image with the copy in context, enabling you to recall that image more easily, thus remembering the idea that went with it.

 

Another way visual content can help boost the reading experience of your blog, is by breaking up your copy further. It provides a pause to stop and reflect on what’s just been read, before moving on to the next section.


Via Baiba Svenca
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 31, 12:09 PM

Some great tools listed here. It's so helpful to have ways to incorporate visual content, both in an online course and blended course.

José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, September 1, 4:30 AM

Bela seleção de ferramentas visuais que ajudam a dar um banho de butique em seu blog.

Guru's curator insight, September 1, 10:32 PM

http://affordable-implants-india.com/

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Internet of Things Creates New Security Risks

Internet of Things Creates New Security Risks | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things just made us immensely vulnerable to cyber attacks in a way you can never imagine. Any item you now purchase could be compromised.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Internet+of+Things

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Internet+of+things

 

http://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/01/21/why-is-it-a-must-to-have-basics-knowledge-of-cyber-security-in-a-connected-technology-world/

 


Via Gust MEES
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Brand new brain myths to keep neurobloggers in work

Brand new brain myths to keep neurobloggers in work | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Dean Burnett: With Susan Greenfield’s new book and the movie ‘Lucy’ both showing established brain myths are practically worn-out, we need some new ones, to keep neuroscientists employed

Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, August 29, 3:37 PM

Some tongue-in-cheek neuromyths that are yet to be popular...but wait for it!

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Is Technology Ruining Our Ability to Read Emotions? Study Says Yes

Is Technology Ruining Our Ability to Read Emotions? Study Says Yes | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"We’ve all heard it before, “Kids don’t know grammar anymore because all they do is text,” or “Today’s generation misses everything going on around them because they’re staring at their phones.” But a recent research study by UCLA warns the damage of too much screen time may be even worse than many of us imagined."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 28, 7:23 PM

How often have you seen students sitting at a table together, but communicating via their cell phones. The eyes are on the screens, not their friends and classmates. 

This post shares that technology is impactint students ability to read emotions. The next question to ask might be c"Can this change?"

The answer appears to be yes. For more information click through to the post.

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Controlling extreme events on complex networks

Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network “mobile” can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed.

 

Controlling extreme events on complex networks
• Yu-Zhong Chen, Zi-Gang Huang & Ying-Cheng Lai

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 6121 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep06121


Via Claudia Mihai, Complexity Digest, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Infographie : "30 Facts About Gamification in eLearning"

Infographie : "30 Facts About Gamification in eLearning" | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Gamification in eLearning Infographic: 30 Facts About Gamification in eLearning Infographic by TalentLMS the gamified LMS!

Via uTOP Inria, Laurent Picard, Gisele Brugger
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uTOP Inria's curator insight, August 26, 11:24 PM

(elearning infographics, 30/07/2014)

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Pedagogy, Critical Pedagogy, Hybrid Pedagogy, #digped
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Toward a Luddite Pedagogy

Toward a Luddite Pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The time has come to take a stand against this thoughtless use of “Luddite” in the pejorative. The historical record needs to be set straight, and it needs to be set straight as a prelude to defending a Luddite approach to education.

 

A Luddite pedagogy for the 21st century

Just as the 19th century Luddism was interested far more in a forward-looking political agenda than in particular pieces of technology, so a 21st century Luddism in  education will be concerned with more important issues than whether or not allowing pupils to use their own devices in class is a good idea. Like their political ancestors, the Luddite pedagogues will wield a hammer, but they won’t see any urgency in bringing it down on trivial things like touch-screen gadgetry. Instead, the targets lie elsewhere.

 

One place they lie is in the false talk of liberation that has gained popularity among people using the #edtech hashtag. A Luddite pedagogy is a pedagogy of liberation, and, as such, it clashes head on with the talk of liberation peddled by advocates of edtech. According to the latter, the child, previously condemned to all the unbearably oppressive restrictions of having to learn in groups, can now be liberated by the tech that makes a 1:1 model of education feasible, launching each and every child on an utterly personal learning journey. Liberation as personalisation – here the Luddite finds something that ought to be smashed.

 

But what needs to be smashed is less the pedagogy itself than the idea of freedom it rests on – the more general political notion that freedom is all about freeing individuals from social constraints so that they can pursue their personal projects unhampered by the claims of society. This is the essentially liberal idea championed by Sir Ken Robinson, for instance, for whom it is enough for individuals to find things to do that they enjoy and that allow them to develop a talent.

 

But we need to be clear here: Luddism doesn’t want to smash the concern for personal freedom, rather it wants to smash the idea that it is enough. The untruth of personalisation is its unjustified narrowing of the horizon of liberation.


Via Hybrid Pedagogy
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, August 27, 2:27 PM

"Luddites" have been seen as against progress.  This article argues that they claimed there are more important ways to progress than just new electronic gadgets and scientific advances. -Lon 

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Moocs are free – but for how much longer?

Moocs are free – but for how much longer? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Monetising career development courses could be the next step for the university, says Stanford professor

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know

Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
TEST Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know
by Terry Heick
The above image comes from a presentation from Jesse Stommel , an Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Via Charles Fischer
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Charles Fischer's curator insight, August 26, 5:49 AM

A great article with a wonderful title! I wish I had come up with that definition for teaching. My favorite part was the separation of knowledge, wisdom and understanding. How often do we contemplate the differences between those three words? 

21st Century Learning Coach 's curator insight, August 27, 5:52 PM
From www.teachthought.com - August 26, 5:49 AM
TEST Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know 
by Terry Heick 
 The above image comes from a presentation from Jesse Stommel , an Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at University of Wisconsin-Madison.
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Research: How Video Production Affects Student Engagement

edX recently commissioned a study of nearly 1,000 videos, segmenting them out by by video type and production style, and discovered this among their other findings:

Shorter videos are more engaging. Engagement drops after 6 minutes.Videos with a more personal feeling are more effective than high-fidelity studio recordings.
Videos in which the instructor speaks quickly and with high enthusiasm are more engaging.Khan-style tablet drawings are more engaging than power point slides.
Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 28, 10:29 PM

I love it when research supports the conclusions I've drawn from long experience.

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, Today, 2:29 PM

Perfect detail for our new adventure.

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Half an Hour: Beyond Institutions: Personal Learning in a Networked World

Half an Hour: Beyond Institutions: Personal Learning in a Networked World | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The talk is called "Beyond Institutions Personal Learning in a Networked World" and I want to begin with a story that came across the wires recently and I thought was very appropriate for this venue. This was a manifesto that was authored by economic students demanding that the way their profession be taught be changed.

They made observations about things like the global economic collapse and global climate change and other things not really being addressed by current economic theory. They suggested, not so much that current theory is wrong, although current theory is wrong, but that they should be given alternatives or different ways of being able to look at the world. They wanted, in other words, from my perspective, more control over their education.


Via Susan Bainbridge
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What is Privacy?

What is Privacy? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"Earlier this week, Anil Dash wrote a smart piece unpacking the concept of “public.” He opens with some provocative questions about how we imagine the public, highlighting how new technologies that make heightened visibility possible. For example,

Someone could make off with all your garbage that’s put out on the street, and carefully record how many used condoms or pregnancy tests or discarded pill bottles are in the trash, and then post that information up on the web along with your name and your address. There’s probably no law against it in your area. Trash on the curb is public."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 1, 3:38 PM

Is your definition of privacy different from your students definition? Our world is changing quickly and the concept of privacy is also changing. This post by Danah Body explores this issue and will provide ideas that you may want to use with students in your classes. As this school year commences the need to understand the issue of privacy, esp. online where so much information is gathered about each of us, often without us being aware of it, is important for students to understand.

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The Impact of Great Teachers

The Impact of Great Teachers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Great teachers will impact on a child's future and memories forever. Once children reach their school age, they spend more time with their teachers than their parents. This infographic from Teacher Certification Degrees provides interesting facts on how great teachers affect students' lives.

Via Helen Teague
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Helen Teague's curator insight, August 31, 7:16 AM

Scroll through the version on the blog post link to see the stats and sources

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Why You Remember Less When You Read from a Screen

Why You Remember Less When You Read from a Screen | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

There are undeniable advantages to carrying a whole library on your Kindle or tablet computer but retaining the information you read doesn't seem to be one of them. Recent studies agree that when it comes to recalling information, you're probably ahead to read printed material like bound books, paper journals, and print magazines. In one study that asked Italian college students to read a 28-page story and then place 14 plot events in correct order, Kindle readers performed significantly worse. 

 

Researchers suggest that we have a more difficult time recalling digital information because it has no permanent physical location.

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

"Both anecdotally and in published studies, people report that when trying to locate a particular piece of written information they often remember where in the text it appeared. ... 'We might recall that we passed the red farmhouse near the start of the trail before we started climbing uphill through the forest; in a similar way, we remember that we read about Mr. Darcy rebuffing Elizabeth Bennett on the bottom of the left-hand page in one of the earlier chapters.'"

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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, August 31, 3:54 PM

Hmmm ... I'm not sure if I agree with this ...

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Do schools ignore talents? (Ken Robinson)

His conferences at TED have more than 25 million of views and he is considered one of today's most prominent voices in the world of education. Learning World producer, Aurora Vélez, met Sir Ken Robinson in Paris to talk about talent, innovation and educational challenges as part of Learning World on "XXI Century Education"


Via Edumorfosis, Yashy Tohsaku, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Free Online Classes - 10,000+ Courses on Open Education Database

Free Online Classes - 10,000+ Courses on Open Education Database | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There are no degrees, no fees, and no admissions. Our database of free online classes provides free, high-quality education to anyone who wants to learn.
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Quality and Success Factors of MOOCs

The presentation discusses quality considerations and success factors of MOOCs - a critical review of current discussions and some potentials for Asian-Europea… (El éxito de los #moocs http://t.co/Tv4MxInhec)...

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Leveraging Informal Learning Methods

Leveraging Informal Learning Methods | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

By definition, informal learning is an unofficial, unscheduled, and impromptu way that many people learn today. It usually takes the form of reading articles, books, viewing online courses in spare time, or going to a seminar rather than registering into a formal course.

 

Informal learning is growing because it is usually efficient, autonomous, relevant, accessible, and flexible.

 

People love learning. It is easy to open up a web-browser and search for a topic to find out more information. One survey found that nine out of 10 people indicated they enjoyed learning.

 

Interestingly, in this same survey nearly 40% of working professionals haven’t taken a single course of any type since they were in college.

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The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload | KurzweilAI

The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload | KurzweilAI | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

But somehow some people become quite accomplished at managing information flow. In The Organized Mind, Daniel J. Levitin, PhD, uses the latest brain science to demonstrate how those people excel—and how readers can use their methods to regain a sense of mastery over the way they organize their homes, workplaces, and time.

 

With lively, entertaining chapters on everything from the kitchen junk drawer to health care to executive office workflow, Levitin reveals how new research into the cognitive neuroscience of attention and memory can be applied to the challenges of our daily lives. This Is Your Brain on Music showed how to better play and appreciate music through an understanding of how the brain works. The Organized Mind shows how to navigate the churning flood of information in the twenty-first century with the same neuroscientific perspective


Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, August 27, 10:43 AM

I've not read this book yet, but I've ordered it. I enjoyed Levitin's previous book, "This Is Your Brain on Music," and although I am skeptical of what has been called "neurobollocks," I suspect this will be a good addition to my small infotention library.

JoseAlvarezCornett's comment, August 28, 6:07 AM
Howard, besides your own book and this one, can you list five must read books about infotention?
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The Real Legacy of MOOCs: Better Introductory Courses

The Real Legacy of MOOCs: Better Introductory Courses | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Rather than a narrative that puts the MOOC phenomenon within a “bound-to-crash and there will be tears” frame, I believe we will eventually be telling a much happier story about the impact of MOOC hype. This will not be a story about open online learning replacing traditional bricks-and-mortar institutions or of one superstar professor replacing the teaching of thousands of others. Instead, the real impact of MOOCs will be felt far away from the open online edX or Coursera courses. The real impact of MOOCs will be found in the traditional introductory course.


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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How Much Time Do Students Worldwide Spend In Classrooms? - Edudemic

How Much Time Do Students Worldwide Spend In Classrooms? - Edudemic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

When we compare education systems around the world (which we do, quite often) to see what’s working and what isn’t, one of the metrics we often see is ‘school life expectancy’, otherwise known as how many years students go to school. In the US, we most often assume that students go to school for at least 13 years (K-12), plus “some” college or post high school education. When we talk about schools in developing countries, we hear about children who can’t go to school past a young age (sometimes around 8 years old) because they need to make money for their family’s survival, because they don’t have the opportunity to do so, because of their gender, or because it would be dangerous or prohibitively expensive to do so.

A new report from Cornell University, INSEAD and the World Intellectual Property Organization takes a look at school life expectancy around the globe. The results are pretty interesting, though this particular graph brings up a number of questions including a fairly substantial one: Does a greater number of years in school mean more learning, or students who are better prepared for careers? Obviously quantity doesn’t necessarily mean quality, do we also see things like higher test scores in areas where school life expectancy is very high? What other big questions would you ask? Weigh in by leaving a comment below, mentioning @Edudemic on Twitter or leaving your thoughts on our Facebook page.
Global School Life Expectancy

Where are children going to school the longest? The graphic below looks at primary to tertiary education life expectancy around the globe.

* There are 8 countries where students spend an average of 17-20 years in school: Australia, New Zealand, Iceland, Ireland, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, and Finland
* There are 5 countries where students spend an average of 0-5 years in school: Senegal, Pakistan, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, and Niger
* The vast majority of countries for which data was available show that students spend between 10-15 years in school on average

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Learnlets » Rethinking Design: Pedagogy

Learnlets » Rethinking Design: Pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

In thinking through how to design courses that lead to both engaging experiences and meaningful outcomes, I’ve been working on the component activities.  As part of that, I’ve been looking at elements such as pedagogy in pre-, in-, and post-class sessions so that there are principled reasons behind the design.

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