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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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A Beautiful Visual Explaining The Internet of Things

A Beautiful Visual Explaining The Internet of Things | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Internet of Things (IoT) is a relatively new concept that is making such a buzz online. I have come across it in several instances but never really inquired deeply about its meaning. However, today I read a really interesting article by Jacob Morgan entitled " A Simple Explanation of 'The Internet of Things'. In this article, Jacob defined IoT as "the concept of basically connecting any device with an on and off switch to the Internet (and/or to each other). This includes everything from cell phones, coffee makers, washing machines, headphones, lamps, wearable devices and almost anything else you can think of.  This also applies to components of machines, for example a jet engine of an airplane or the drill of an oil rig."

Via John Evans
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New Learning Times : Article Raspberry Heights Workshop

New Learning Times : Article Raspberry Heights Workshop | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Seven-year-old Olivia Callahan tells us that her dad has six computers. Of course he does. He's the director of technology at the School of Visual Arts MFA design program and a tinkerer at heart. So when he discovered the Raspberry Pi, a tiny computer in a colorful case designed for tiny hands, he brought it home for Olivia. She finally had a computer that was truly her own. She learned to build it, start it up, install software on it, and play games on it. One Kickstarter campaign later, their co-computing sessions expanded to include her friends and eventually, other kids from Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. Now, one year later, the father-daughter team is teaching kids how to build their own computers, program them, and design their own games. Rather than viewing the computer as an omnipresent, mysterious box (or screen) that gives you information and answers, the Raspberry Heights Workshop seeks to empower kids to become familiar with all the parts of a computer—the hardware and the software—and use that as a stepping stone toward lifelong computing literacy.

Via Jim Lerman
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Why we need badges in science

Why we need badges in science | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In the world of research, as with most vocational settings, there’s a lot that gets done that goes unrecognized. That unrecognized work can not only be crucial for getting to the actual research outcome put forward in the form of publications, but also for reflecting important skills gained.
Yet, outside of the traditional means of credit—such as degrees, publications, role titles—there is no real way of recognizing this skill with the same issuing authority as with which one receives a degree o

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10 tips for securing your smartphone

10 tips for securing your smartphone | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Remote wiping? Encryption? Secure passcode? Here are 10 tips to ensure you keep your smartphone just as secure as your PC.

 

1. Always secure your smartphone with a password
2. Ensure that your device locks itself automatically
3. Install security software
4. Only download apps from approved sources
5. Check your apps' permissions
6. Don't miss operating system updates
7. Be wary of any links you receive via email or text message
8. Encrypt your smartphone
9. Turn off automatic Wi-Fi connection
10. Turn off Bluetooth and NFC when not in use

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Globally connected minds | Learning with 'e's

Globally connected minds | Learning with 'e's | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Increasingly, the effect of the global connected mind will emerge as a social phenomenon. There are representations of this in popular culture. In Star Trek, the Next Generation, the Borg are a powerful, marauding society of nomadic cybernetic organisms - or cyborgs - that assimilate every society they encounter. They do so by absorbing the collective intelligence of each new world into their own vast, already existing hive mind. Resistance is futile, because everyone they encounter is overpowered, and integrated. Although I don't foresee a time when we will ever be invaded by such cyborgs, it serves to illustrate the fact that we are better when we are connected and are working concertedly toward a shared goal.

There is a growing feeling amongst the networked nation that we can do so much more together than we can as isolated individuals. To be a truly globally connected community, we must learn to work together, freely share and exchange our ideas and resources, and ultimately, teach each other about the world around us. We have the tools to do so. It is already beginning to happen.

"We have 3 billion new minds coming on line to work with us to help us solve our grand challenges." - Peter Diamandis (TED Talk)
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Easy Way to Add Subtitles to Videos in Google Drive

Easy Way to Add Subtitles to Videos in Google Drive | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
November 24, 2014
I have just come across this excellent Google Drive tip and want to bring it to your attention as well. The tip is about adding subtitles to videos in Google Drive.This time it is...

Via Maria Margarida Correia, Zélia Santos (zeliams), Rui Guimarães Lima
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Personalize My Learning, Please (Infographic)

Personalize My Learning, Please (Infographic) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Some of the things we think about when designing personalized learning curriculum. What else do you think about? ~Mia

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 26, 9:00 PM

This infographic, byt Mia MacMeekin, looks at personalized learning and the three areas below. In each area the question is also "How can curriculum design address personalized learning?"

What are the three areas?

* What is personalized learning

* How to personalize learning

* Examples of personalized learning

In each of these areas she also looks at the How, What, When, Where, and Why, providing key words or phrases that help you dig a little deeper into the subject.

Mia MacMeekin has provided an infographic that you could share with others in your building. Today we are asked to personalize curriculum, but support is not always available. This visual will help you better understand some key concepts, and provide you with ideas on how you might move forward.

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Updated E-Learning Definitions

As e-learning has matured, it has begun to be used in different ways to address diverse goals. Several models have emerged that have different geographical and curricular implications. It is important to be able to distinguish among these factors in order to compare practices and to understand and be able to effectively apply research findings. Shared definitions will also empower students to make better decisions. The major goals of e-learning include: improving access for both traditional-age and nontraditional students who are not otherwise able to attend a traditional, campus-based program; improving efficiency and effectiveness by using e-learning media and methods to control cost or provide other efficiencies or to make large-enrollment courses more effective for students; and improving student choice over when, where, and how to engage in the learning process. In addition, we are assuming that courses and programs defined below are instructor-led experiences, distinguishing them from some corporate training models.

The following definitions are designed to help both faculty and students better understand the different kinds of e-learning that are now practiced in higher education and to provide institutions with some standard models to encourage effective sharing of data about e-learning, at both the individual course and the curriculum level.
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, Today, 9:55 AM

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11 Higher Ed Groups That I’m Thankful For | Technology and Learning @insidehighered

11 Higher Ed Groups That I’m Thankful For | Technology and Learning @insidehighered | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
My favorite Thanksgiving tradition is when we go around the table and everybody says what they are thankful for.  In that spirit, I’d like to share 11 reasons why I’m grateful to work at the intersection of learning and technology: -------------------------------------#2 - Our Critics and Skeptics:  If you are not skeptical about the application of technology to education then you should be.  The history of educational technology is not a very happy one.  It is a history of too much hype and too little results.  In higher ed we spend too much technology money on non-mission related activities.  More troubling, those of us who work in edtech have failed to make common cause with faculty.  We have talked too much and listened too little.  The critics and skeptics of the edtech community are our best assets.  If you believe that most of us in our higher ed community share the same goals around teaching and knowledge creation (which I do), then we should view debate with those most skeptical of technological interventions as opportunities to learn.  I am grateful to all those educators that take the time and energy to engage with and critique our edtech community.
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George Siemens: ‘Students need to take ownership of their learning’

George Siemens: ‘Students need to take ownership of their learning’ | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In regard to MOOCs, what do you think are the most important factors that need to be addressed to improve user experience and boost MOOCs to the next level?

There are a few things, but one is the interaction component – users need to have better opportunities to learn from each other. A lot of what’s wrong with MOOCs stems from how they emulate traditional classrooms, and so that means we are very heavily emphasising the knowledge of the teacher and the students’ activity in relation to that teacher’s knowledge.

To adopt better peer-based models where students are teaching one another; where you have models that allow you to serve as peer-evaluators and peer-mentors, and so on, I think that’s a key element.

Another aspect is to start using better use of data. Typically the current use of data is just for publishing, so the use is still very much a post-course evaluation when it comes to data rather than real-time.

Another crucial factor is the recognition that learners have different levels when they engage in MOOCs – this is for digital learning in general. There’s the need to start using adaptive and personalised learning approaches so that the existing knowledge of a learner determines or influences what we teach.
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A New Tool to Search for Images Licensed for School Use

A New Tool to Search for Images Licensed for School Use | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Photos for Class is a very good web tool that you and your students can use to search for and download Creative Common licensed images. The search engine of Photos for Class uses Flickr safe search to return results that are licensed for school use.


Via John Evans
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jose antonio gabelas's curator insight, November 25, 1:41 PM

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Learning To Learning: 7 Critical Shifts

Learning To Learning: 7 Critical Shifts | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
TEST Learning To Learning: 7 Critical Shifts
by TeachThought Staff
Guy Claxton is professor of education at Bristol University, and author of Hare Brain, Tortoise Mind How Intelligence Increases When You Think Less (1997).

Via Charles Fischer
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Charles Fischer's curator insight, November 25, 7:45 AM

These shifts are amazing learning goals. In particular, "critical curiosity" is perhaps the most important. Most of the "good" thinking questions asked in school are from the teachers. The ones asked by students are mostly clarifying questions about assignments. Students need far more opportunities to practice asking powerful questions.

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Explainer: what is a Small Private Online Course?

Explainer: what is a Small Private Online Course? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
If you have studied an online course at a university over the past couple of decades, you’ve probably already experienced a SPOC, or Small Private Online Course. SPOC is a new term for an old concept…

 

The first two letters of SPOC are intentionally the opposite of the first two letters of MOOC, or Massive Open Online Course. MOOCs are massive, taught to thousands or tens of thousands of students at once, whereas SPOCs are small, and studied by tens or hundreds. MOOCs are open and free, whereas SPOCs are private and sometimes costly. Both are online courses.


Via Peter Mellow
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Montessori Lessons for Innovators

Montessori Lessons for Innovators | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
ince the revelations that many stars of silicon valley are alumni of Montessori schools there has been a lot of interest in what managers can learn from the Montessori approach to education. I hadn’t realized this until Tim told me but the founders of Google, Larry Page and Sergei Brin, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales are all members of the US creative elite called the “Montessori Mafia“.
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The Top 10 Benefits of Online Training Part 1

The Top 10 Benefits of Online Training Part 1 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Researchers at Bersin by Deloitte also found that companies who spend more on learning and development strategy performed better than companies who did not. If you are an organization that is looking to reap similar benefit with budgets of average size, technology is revolutionizing the market so you can. The growth in technology tools to train and develop employees can now happen online allowing you to reach more employees at a lower cost. Having a learning management system (LMS) in place is the first step in ensuring you can provide online training. There are many more benefits of online training aside from cost savings—continue reading for the first five of the top 10 benefits of online training.

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Researchers Identify Brain Regions That Encode Words, Grammar and Story

Researchers Identify Brain Regions That Encode Words, Grammar and Story | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Researchers from CMU’s Machine Learning Department performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of eight people as they read a chapter of that Potter book. They then analyzed the scans, cubic millimeter by cubic millimeter, for every four-word segment of that chapter. The result was the first integrated computational model of reading, identifying which parts of the brain are responsible for such subprocesses as parsing sentences, determining the meaning of words and understanding relationships between characters.

As Leila Wehbe, a Ph.D. student in the Machine Learning Department, and Tom Mitchell, the department head, report today in the online journal PLOS ONE, the model was able to predict fMRI activity for novel text passages with sufficient accuracy to tell which of two different passages a person was reading with 74 percent accuracy.

“At first, we were skeptical of whether this would work at all,” Mitchell said, noting that analyzing multiple subprocesses of the brain at the same time is unprecedented in cognitive neuroscience. “But it turned out amazingly well and now we have these wonderful brain maps that describe where in the brain you’re thinking about a wide variety of things.”
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Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning

Group presentation to provide an overview of Mayer's theory.

Via Paulo Rurato, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, Today, 9:47 AM

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Five Elements of Motivation for Games in E-Learning

Five Elements of Motivation for Games in E-Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
eLearning courses is the new trend. But, why do we use games? Games in eLearning are used for two main reasons – communication and motivation.

Communication: Games can be used to make complex and difficult content easy to learn. Games can be used as a strategy to help learners remember facts and apply guidelines to their job. Retention of knowledge is increased as games facilitate effective engagement of the learner, especially when the games are based on the learner’s work environment.

Motivation: Games motivate learners to stay focused on the content, throughout the course, without any distractions. Motivation is the most important factor in eLearning, as it challenges the learner to win and complete the course.

In this post, we will look at the top five elements that add value to games and motivate learners.

 

1. Visually rich backgrounds

2. Real images/ Characters

3. Score/ Points

4. Feedback

5, Sound clips

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8 ways teachers can talk less and get kids talking more

8 ways teachers can talk less and get kids talking more | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
On Twitter, I recently shared an excellent article by Justin Tarte called 5 Questions Every Teacher Should Ask Him/Herself. The first reflection question Justin recommends is:

Who is doing a majority of the talking in your classroom? It’s the person who is doing the majority of the talking that tends to do the most learning, so what is the teacher/student talking ratio in your classroom? If you find yourself always talking more than your students, try and figure out some ways to empower your students so they are more involved in the learning.

Via John Evans
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How To Kill Learner Curiosity In 12 Easy Steps

How To Kill Learner Curiosity In 12 Easy Steps | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"Killing a learner’s natural curiosity doesn’t happen overnight. It can take as long as 12 years, and in some rare cases even that isn’t long enough.

Learning environments focused on standards, assessment, and compliance allow for the implementation of research-based strategies in pursuit of streams of data to prove that learning is happening. Curiosity is nice, but it’s a monumental challenge to measure."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 26, 9:12 PM

As we work with our students are we "killing a learner's natural curiosity" based on what happens in our classroom? This post looks at 12 ways we may be "killing curiosity" in our classrooms, often based on what we are being told to do with our students.
Each of these ideas in explored more fully in the text that follows the image that lists the 12 ways.

As you read through this think about what you might shift, to allow your students to be more curious.

niftyjock's curator insight, November 27, 4:14 PM

Industrialisation of education

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Comparing Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning by Andrew Hughes

Comparing Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning by Andrew  Hughes | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Choosing between synchronous and asynchronous learning

While synchronous and asynchronous learning each have their advantages and drawbacks, the best approach for a given design project is based on multiple factors. Here are three:

* The students and their learning needs
* The type of content
* The time availability of your learners

For example:

* If you are training a group that consists of individuals who have significant professional experience, who require lots of interaction and “talk time,” and who prefer being around and working with their colleagues you may find a synchronous approach to work best, given a comparative familiarity with eLearning.

 

* The nature of the content is vital in determining the style of learning. Should your content be filled with complex ideas and technical terms that require much explaining or situational context, you may find asynchronous is not the right approach.

 

* When content is easy to digest or in reflection of a complex issue, asynchronous could be the right move.

 

* Finally, the availability of your learners as well as their access to the Internet are important in making a decision on your approach. If your audience is juggling training, work, and extra schooling they may not have the time to devote to completing training in one sitting. This is where asynchronous training really shines—freedom to complete at one’s own pace.

Both synchronous and asynchronous approaches to eLearning have their advantages and disadvantages. While one approach may be more effective than the other in a given situation, it is not to say it is best for all learning situations.

Think about each approach, and how your content and audience fit, to ensure you reach your

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George Orwell’s Final Warning: Don’t Let This Nightmare Situation Happen. It Depends on You!

George Orwell’s Final Warning: Don’t Let This Nightmare Situation Happen. It Depends on You! | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

More than 60 years after his death and the closely preceding publication of his best-known novel 1984, we look to George Orwell as a kind of prophet of the ills of corporatism, socialism, authoritarianism, totalitarianism — any powerful -ism, essentially, in which we can find nasty, freedom-destroying implications. The BBC documentary Orwell: A Life in Pictures, which we featured a few years back, makes a point of highlighting Orwell’s “warning” to what he saw as a fast corporatizing/socializing/authoriatarianizing/totalitarianizing world. In the film’s final dramatized scene above (watch the complete film here), the re-created Orwell himself makes the following ominous prediction:

"Allowing for the book, after all, being a parody, something like 1984 could actually happen. This is the direction the world is going in at the present time. In our world, there will be no emotions except fear, rage, triumph, and self-abasement. The sex instinct will be eradicated. We shall abolish the orgasm. There will be no loyalty except loyalty to the Party. But always there will be the intoxication of power. Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who’s helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face, forever. The moral to be drawn from this dangerous nightmare situation is a simple one: don’t let it happen. It depends on you."

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15 Tips For Facilitating Online Discussion

15 Tips For Facilitating Online Discussion | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Facilitating discussions between students is one of those things that is infinitely easier when you’re teaching in a physical classroom rather than online. When the students are all in one room, discussions happen more naturally. Facilitating the same type of productive, useful discussion when teaching online is more of a challenge.

The handy infographic below from Mia MacMeekin takes a look at some tips and best practices for facilitating discussions when you’re teaching online. If you teach online and have any favorite tips and tricks, leave us a message in the comments!

15 Tips For Facilitating Online Discussion

Start reading posts early
Give constructive feedback, public and private
Identify writing issues early
Participate frequently
Follow the rubric
Stimulate conversation
Make it real
Empower the students to share
Keep it alive
Praise well written arguments
Never criticize publicly
Never wait too long to stimulate discussion
Never take one side
Never discount someone’s experience
Never let inaccurate information go unnoticed

10 Prompts to Stimulate Conversation

Can you clarify?
Do you need anything else to answer this?
Do you think?
Do you agree with?
So are you saying?
Have you seen?
So on the news, I noticed something similar
What do your friends think?
Is there someone else you can ask?
Where did you hear that?
Do you have a reference for that?

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The case for agile pedagogy

The case for agile pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There is, though, another approach to both software development and, I think, curriculum design. In the world of programming, ideas of adaptive design and the lightweight approaches of the 90s were crystallised in 2001 with the publication of the Manifesto for Agile Software Development, which, while acknowledging that while processes and tools, comprehensive documentation, contract negotiation and following a plan all have their value, much more is gained through focusing on individuals and interactions, getting software that works, collaborating with customers and responding to change.

With a little adaptation, these are ideas which many of us would see as important in a more learner centric, flexible approach to teaching: an approach where we teach the pupils and students we work with, not the ring binder we're given.

Focusing on individuals and interactions means, I think, a serious attempt to provide the personalised learning we used to hear so much about, itself a reiteration of the heady days of Plowden's "At the heart of the educational process lies the child". If Gove goes ahead and "disapplies" the ICT programmes of study, we have an opportunity to tailor what we teach as well as how we teach to the needs, enthusiasms and aspirations of each learner – to ask, "What would you like to learn?" and then to help each find ways to teach themselves and one another.
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Learning Analysis of Social Networks

Learning Analysis of Social Networks | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Network Elements
Social networks have some key structural elements that can be identified in order to establish a common language and conceptual model. This allows us to analyze them. In this mooc we discussed three key elements, the actor, relations, and data sources.

Actor
The actor is a node or vertex within the network. In social networks this is typically a person or learner, but I don’t think it would necessarily need to be a person.

Relations
The relation in the network refers to the ties, edges, arcs, and links that connect the actors. Relations can be undirected and weighted or they can have a direction, meaning that an actor can be the sender and any actor that receives data can be the receiver. So, actors can be senders or receivers or both.

Additionally, the relation between two actors can also be labeled or categorized. This means they can represent something, such as friendship, advice, hindrance, or can be a form of communication. I would imagine this could be a very interesting component of network analysis to try and identify and define these relations for the purpose of understanding the learner, the network, or the context.
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