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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Didactics and Technology in Education
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A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools

A Pedagogical Framework For Digital Tools | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've needed a strong pedagogical framework for digital tools since the introduction of technology into education. Hopefully this helps.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke, Rui Guimarães Lima
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

The monological form of teaching – Learning is the student's acquisition of this knowledge.Tools – distributing and intermediary tools.

 

The dialogical form of teaching – Learning is seen as the student's development of this inherent basis of knowledge. Tools that support students' problem oriented; simulations and more advanced learning games.

 

The polyphonic form of teaching – Learning is the student's participation in exchange of many different individuals' perception of the world.

Tools that support equal collaboration

 

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Louise Robinson-Lay's comment, December 23, 2012 8:26 PM
Thank you, we all need to move between frameworks.
Dolly Bhasin 's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:10 AM

The framework is based on a distinction between a monological, a dialogical, and a polyphonic form of teaching. The three forms of teaching can be distinguished by their different perceptions of how learning takes place, and by their different perceptions of the relations between subject matter, teacher and student. By considering which form of teaching one wants to practice, one may, on the basis of the pedagogical framework, assess whether it would be appropriate to use a specific tool in teaching.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, December 27, 2012 6:44 PM

changing among 4 different frameworks - interesting and short reading

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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5 Incredible Free Audio Editing Tools for E-learning Developers

5 Incredible Free Audio Editing Tools for E-learning Developers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Audio plays a key role in enhancing the effectiveness of eLearning courses. It reduces the cognitive load on the learner and ensures better learning. But, how can you make sure that the audio you use in your eLearning course is first-rate? Well, efficient editing goes a long way in producing excellent audio.

There are a number of tools available in the market that can be used to edit audio. These audio editors have lot of features that can be used to apply different types of audio effects to our online courses. We can convert the audio file into different formats based on our requirements. Let us now look at a few popular audio editing tools.
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification
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Welcome to Gamification.org - Gamification Wiki

Welcome to Gamification.org - Gamification Wiki | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

 

Gamification.org is the leading resource and community for gamification information, research and examples in over 18 languages.

 

Since creation of the Gamification Wiki in November 2010, Gamification has surged in popularity and has quickly become one of the most talked about trends. Gamification.org was created to be the ultimate resource for the emerging Gamification Industry, creating a collaborative space for those interested to come together as a community and learn and explore what works and what doesn't and to collectively benefit from the knowledge and wisdom of the community.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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5 Myths About Kids and Computers

5 Myths About Kids and Computers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When speaking to teachers and parents about teaching computer skills to their kids, there are a few things that adults tend to assume about how kids use computers. Many of these things are simply not true, at least in my experience of teaching digital storytelling, animation, and web design to middle and high schoolers. I think an English class that uses, for example, toondoo.com to create comic strip versions of stories that kids might be reading or writing in class, will go a lot smoother if the teacher is aware of what to expect and what NOT to expect from students.
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Open Education and Personal Learning - by Stephen Downes

In this presentation I outline major aspects of the learning and performance support systems (LPSS) program as it relates to open education environments. In particular I focus on understanding OERs as words, aggregating and analyzing OERs, data representation, and learner production and sharing of OERs. I conclude with a number of brief case studies of how work in LPSS supports this perspective. For audio please see http://www.downes.ca/presentation/360


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design

Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Are you planning and communicating your feedback criteria? Here is our Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design, an infographic to help you plan better assessments.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Joel Anfuso's curator insight, April 23, 4:30 PM

I have used a number of text forms of blooms but its great to see a clear graphical presentation thats easy to follow.

Barbara Macfarlan's curator insight, April 23, 5:17 PM

This is a very useful reminder for when we lose inspiration and wonder what it' serially all about.

Sandra Ciccarello's curator insight, April 23, 9:06 PM

This is perfect! Brings task creation, assessment of learning, feedback and differentiation all together in one easy to understand visual. I like it a lot.

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Moving Beyond MOOCS

Moving Beyond MOOCS | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In many ways, we have a romanticized view of college. Popular portrayals of a typical classroom show a handful of engaged students sitting attentively around a small seminar table while their Harrison Ford-like professor shares their wisdom about the...

Via Peter Mellow
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The Ultimate Guide to Note Taking in Class

The Ultimate Guide to Note Taking in Class | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The Ultimate Guide to Note Taking in Class Infographic lists some of the ways that can help students take better notes in class.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, John Evans
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RebeccaMoore's curator insight, April 19, 6:52 PM

Three strategies for effective note-taking with examples, pros and cons, and tips

Michael Westwood's curator insight, April 23, 5:37 PM

The "Pen vs. Keyboard" seems a bit questionable, but otherwise a potentially useful way to introduce this topic to students.

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Listening to classical music modulates genes that are responsible for brain functions

Listening to classical music modulates genes that are responsible for brain functions | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Although listening to music is common in all societies, the biological determinants of listening to music are largely unknown. According to a latest study, listening to classical music enhanced the activity of genes involved in dopamine secretion and transport, synaptic neurotransmission, learning and memory, and down-regulated the genes mediating neurodegeneration. Several of the up-regulated genes were known to be responsible for song learning and singing in songbirds, suggesting a common evolutionary background of sound perception across species.

 

Summary from Learning and the Brain Society Newsletter - April 2015

Listening to classical music modulates genes that are responsible for brain functions 

University of Helsinki

 

"Listening to music represents a complex cognitive function of the human brain, which is known to induce several neuronal and physiological changes. A Finnish study group has investigated how listening to classical music affected the gene expression profiles of both musically experienced and inexperienced participants. All the participants listened to W.A. Mozart's violin concert Nr 3, G-major, K.216 that lasts 20 minutes. Listening to music enhanced the activity of genes involved in dopamine secretion and transport, synaptic function, learning and memory. One of the most up-regulated genes, synuclein-alpha (SNCA) is a known risk gene for Parkinson's disease that is located in the strongest linkage region of musical aptitude. SNCA is also known to contribute to song learning in songbirds."The up-regulation of several genes that are known to be responsible for song learning and singing in songbirds suggest a shared evolutionary background of sound perception between vocalizing birds and humans", says Dr. Irma Järvelä, the leader of the study."


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iPamba's curator insight, April 22, 2:34 PM

In this study, European participants listen to European classical music. It would be interesting to compare these findings to studies involving participants and forms of classical music from around the world. Also, how do these findings compare with the effects on participants of other forms of music that are not "classical"?

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Moodle 2.9 QA Testing now over 95%

Moodle 2.9 QA Testing now over 95% | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Moodle’s QA Testing round for 2.9 now looks to be over 95% complete with about 15 open tracker tickets left to be further developed, fixed, tested or peer reviewed. There is a short list of “must fix” items for Moodle’s 2.9 release pending as well.

Great work to the bug finders and QA testers who volunteered to try out the new features and validate that they were in working order. If you have not yet joined the effort and want to help get the release over the finish line you can get connected here: https://moodle.org/mod/forum/discuss.php?d=311780

To review the open tickets check out http://goo.gl/0odk7D

A list of the ‘must fix’ items left to be resolved is available here: https://tracker.moodle.org/browse/MDL/fixforversion/14751/

Finally, if you’re just interested in trying out one of the new features in 2.9 (like the many in the quiz or highlighted here) you can demo a working version of 2.9 at http://qa.moodle.net/
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10 Questions to Ask When Planning Tech Infused Units

10 Questions to Ask When Planning Tech Infused Units | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Here at Edtech at About.com, we've put together a list of potential technology-related questions that you may want to ask yourself when planning for instruction and designing curriculum. Many of these ideas are inspired by existing frameworks and philosophies focused on tech integration.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Are teachers drowning in a sea of tasks?

Are teachers drowning in a sea of tasks? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Opening the laptop this morning to catch up on the latest edu news it’s yet more grim reading. BBC reports Trainee teachers are being deterred from entering the profession while schools are also likely to spread the supply teacher search abroad. The impending teacher shortage in the coming years is becoming as familiar as the ‘Winter is Coming’ warning in Game of Thrones, but just like the Kings and Queens of Westeros, little is being undertaken to prepare for this monumental challenge. The run up to the election seems to offer little salvation with everyone is pledging promises to fix everything but the most important. Pledging more money to schools, reducing class sizes, building new schools and retesting SATs may in one way or another sound enticing, but if there’s not enough teachers to support this then they’re likely to have minimal impact.

The reality is getting more people into teaching is a difficult task, and there’s likely to be a period where there’s a significant shortage in the UK before any interventions the government make come to fruition. So the real question is how do schools and teachers best support the generation who will bear the brunt of any shortages? Recently I’ve been reading The Digital Classroom, and while it’s 7 years old there’s a lot in it that gave me food for thought. There’s 2 areas in particular that are very interesting, and can make a big impact, all the more if we do experience a significant shortage of teachers.
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TEACHING IN AN ONLINE LEARNING CONTEXT by Terry Anderson

TEACHING IN AN ONLINE LEARNING CONTEXT by Terry Anderson | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, April 21, 5:59 AM

"This chapter focuses on the role of the teacher or tutor in an online learning context. It uses the theoretical model developed by Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000) that views the creation of an effective online educational community as involving three critical components: cognitive presence, social presence, and teaching presence. This model was developed and verified through content analysis and by other qualitative and quantitative measures in recent research work at the University of Alberta (for papers resulting from this work see Anderson, Garrison, Archer & Rourke, N.d.) (http://www.atl.ualberta.ca/cmc)."

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Technology Trends - Singularity Blog: Most Anticipated New Technologies for 2015/2016

Technology Trends - Singularity Blog: Most Anticipated New Technologies for 2015/2016 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Future timeline, a timeline of humanity's future, based on current trends, long-term environmental changes, advances in technology such as Moore's Law, the latest medical advances, and the evolving geopolitical landscape.

 

10TB solid state drives may soon be possibleConsumer virtual reality will grow exponentially 200GB microSD card announced by SanDisk"The Vive" – new VR headset being developed by HTC and ValveTesco becomes first UK retailer to launch a Google Glass-enabled serviceLaying the foundations for 5G mobileClothes that can monitor and transmit biomedical info3-D haptic shapes can be seen and felt in mid-airAI software can identify objects in photos and videos at near-human levelsDARPA circuit achieves speed of 1 terahertz (THz)3D printer which is 10 times faster than current modelsCreating DNA-based electrical circuitsWi-Fi up to five times faster coming in 2015Long-distance virtual telepathy is demonstratedThe Internet of Things: A Trillion Dollar MarketBrain-like supercomputer the size of a postage stampProject Adam: a new deep-learning system
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ken Robinson: Government "Standardization" Blocks Innovative Education Reform

Ken Robinson: Government "Standardization" Blocks Innovative Education Reform | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

“I never blame teachers or schools… But there is this deadly culture of standardizing, that’s being pushed on them, politically. My core message here is that we have to personalize education, not standardize it. That all children are different, and we have to find their talents and cultivate them.” ~Ken Robinson

 

 

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Christian Jarrett: Myths and facts about the brain and learning - LT15 Conference - YouTube

The brain and the mind are hot topics right now. Unfortunately real psychology and neuroscience are frequently obscured by hype, myth and misunderstanding.


Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, April 23, 8:31 PM

A review of the facts and myths about the brain and learning by Christian Jarrett, compiler of the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest blog.

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Brain Based Learning | Stop Telling Your Students to Study

Brain Based Learning | Stop Telling Your Students to Study | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Have you ever noticed, during your own episodes of studying and learning, that it can be very easy to overestimate your knowledge or comprehension? Have you ever studied diligently for a test only to experience the dreaded “Uh-oh – I don’t know this stuff as well as I thought” moment when it came time to actually take the test? If so, you are not alone.

What you have experienced is, as some researchers call it, an Illusion of Competence. That is, when reviewing and “studying”, the ease at which we can recall, recognize, or define information leads us to a false sense of security in our knowledge. When studying is easy our confidence is high. The problem is that this confidence may be an illusion. Why might this be the case? Keep reading, it gets really interesting.

But before we dive into some of the academic research, allow me to illustrate with a real-world example. Think about a teenager you know – perhaps one who is ready to take the test to get their learner’s permit for a driver’s license. In most cases, students are provided with a manual or brochure that outlines some of the laws, topics, and information they need to know. So, they go about “studying” for the test. They read the brochure, they highlight and underline key points, and re-read the material they’ve previously highlighted. But even after all this studying, many students fail to pass the exam. Why might this be the case?

The traditional study techniques of reading, highlighting, and re-reading previously highlighted material are primarily passive. In other words, they don’t require much cognitive effort. And, as a result, those strategies can lead learners to a false sense of security. They can lead us to believe that since the content seems fairly easy at the time of the review, we’re ready to perform well on a test. Passive study techniques can lead to an illusion of depth, an illusion of comprehension, or an illusion of competence.

This all makes sense of course. There is a big difference between being able to recognize a topic or define a term when you are reviewing notes for a test and actually being able to analyze, explain, or elaborate.


So, how do we overcome this illusion? How do we go from studying to learning?

First, help your students understand that most traditional study techniques – reading, highlighting, re-reading – are limited in their effectiveness. The goal is not to study. The goal is to learn the information so that they have a depth of knowledge and understanding.

Second, require students to actively interact with the content and information in multiple ways. Reading and highlighting are OK, but they are just the very beginning strategies to build basic background knowledge. Students should be required to participate in discussions where they elaborate, explain, and reference the content. They should be required to write about their understanding in order to further clarify and expand their thinking. Students should take self-quizzes, partner quizzes, and be required to present their learning in some manner; perhaps by teaching the content to other students. All of these strategies require active retrieval and manipulation of the content. In other words, these approaches kick the brain into gear and require students to do something with their knowledge

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Reclaiming Personal Learning - by Stephen Downes

Part of a wider session called 'Education's Reality Check', this presentation highlights the need for, and structure of, personal learning, introducing participants to the Learning and Performance Support Systems project at lpss.me

 

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Promoting Academic Integrity: Are We Doing Enough?

Promoting Academic Integrity: Are We Doing Enough? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Maryellen Weimer, PhD:

 

 

'Could it be that in our efforts to prevent cheating we have failed to also promote academic integrity? Another study found that students understood they weren’t supposed to plagiarize, but they weren’t sure why. These students avoided plagiarizing so they wouldn’t get in trouble with the teacher, not because they really understood what it was or why it was a problem."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 22, 12:36 PM

 I agree that addressing personal integrity is a powerful element in the complex mix of understanding plagiarism and cheating. 


However, without information literacy (let alone fluency) students simply can't cope in the online environment.  For me the foundation is built on understanding ethical use of digital information.

Michael Westwood's curator insight, April 23, 5:40 PM

A very thoughtful article. The comments are also interesting.

Are students confronting themselves with what cheating does to them? The damage to the sense of self-worth is difficult to repair. Cheaters lie to themselves and they lie to others. By deciding to cheat, these students are telling themselves that it doesn’t matter that they haven’t learned or haven’t done the work, and that it’s OK to pretend to others that they have. And those aren’t the type of actions that make a person feel proud and accomplished. Cheating may improve a grade but the costs to personal integrity are high and far-reaching. - See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/promoting-academic-integrity-are-we-doing-enough/#sthash.AkssHLVu.dpufAre students confronting themselves with what cheating does to them? The damage to the sense of self-worth is difficult to repair. Cheaters lie to themselves and they lie to others. By deciding to cheat, these students are telling themselves that it doesn’t matter that they haven’t learned or haven’t done the work, and that it’s OK to pretend to others that they have. And those aren’t the type of actions that make a person feel proud and accomplished. - See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/promoting-academic-integrity-are-we-doing-enough/#sthash.AkssHLVu.dpufAre students confronting themselves with what cheating does to them? The damage to the sense of self-worth is difficult to repair. Cheaters lie to themselves and they lie to others. By deciding to cheat, these students are telling themselves that it doesn’t matter that they haven’t learned or haven’t done the work, and that it’s OK to pretend to others that they have. And those aren’t the type of actions that make a person feel proud and accomplished. Cheating may improve a grade but the costs to personal integrity are high and far-reaching. - See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/promoting-academic-integrity-are-we-doing-enough/#sthash.AkssHLVu.dpufAre students confronting themselves with what cheating does to them? The damage to the sense of self-worth is difficult to repair. Cheaters lie to themselves and they lie to others. By deciding to cheat, these students are telling themselves that it doesn’t matter that they haven’t learned or haven’t done the work, and that it’s OK to pretend to others that they have. And those aren’t the type of actions that make a person feel proud and accomplished. - See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/promoting-academic-integrity-are-we-doing-enough/#sthash.AkssHLVu.dpuf
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Sir Ken Robinson: Creativity Is In Everything, Especially Teaching

Sir Ken Robinson: Creativity Is In Everything, Especially Teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Creative Teaching

Let me say a few words about creativity. I’ve written a lot about this theme in other publications. Rather than test your patience here with repetition of those ideas, let me refer you to them if you have a special interest. In Out of Our Minds: Learning to Be Creative, I look in some detail at the nature of creativity and how it relates to the idea of intelligence in the arts, the sciences, and other areas of human achievement. In 1997, I was asked by the U.K. government to convene a national commission to advise on how creativity can be developed throughout the school system from ages five through eighteen. That group brought together scientists, artists, educators, and business leaders in a common mission to explain the nature and critical importance of creativity in education. Our report, All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education, set our detailed proposals for how to make this happen in practice and was addressed to people working at all levels of education, from schools to government.

It’s sometimes said that creativity cannot be defined. I think it can. Here’s my definition, based on the work of the All Our Futures group: Creativity is the process of having original ideas that have value.
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Teaching Science to the Brain: Scientists Discover How the Brain Learns the Way Things Work-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University

Teaching Science to the Brain: Scientists Discover How the Brain Learns the Way Things Work-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When you learn a new technical concept, something happens in your brain, but exactly what has been a mystery until now.
For the first time, Carnegie Mellon University scientists have traced the brain processes that occur during the learning of technical concepts. Published in NeuroImage, the findings reveal how new technical knowledge is built up in the brain during the course of different learning stages. The findings foreshadow the capability to assess the effectiveness of instruction and efficiency of learning by monitoring changes in the brain.

 

Summary from Learning and the Brain Society Newsletter - April 2015

Teaching science to the brain: How the brain learns the way things work 

 

For the first time, Carnegie Mellon University scientists have traced the brain processes that occur during the learning of technical concepts. Published in NeuroImage, researchers, scanned the brains of 16 healthy adults as they learned for the first time how four common mechanical systems work. While inside the brain scanner, the participants were shown a series of pictures, diagrams and text that described the internal workings of a bathroom scale, fire extinguisher, automobile braking system and trumpet. The explanation sequence allowed the researchers to examine the participants' brain states after each learning step. The findings reveal how new technical knowledge is built up in the brain during the course of different learning stages and foreshadow the capability to assess the effectiveness of instruction and efficiency of learning by monitoring changes in the brain. Robert Mason lead author explains "This provides evidence that appropriate instruction can bring out the fundamental understanding of how things work at a deep level. In the future, teaching to this deep level as measured in terms of brain representations may be applicable to other disciplines and scientific concepts."


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What Students Can Learn from Giving TEDx Talks

What Students Can Learn from Giving TEDx Talks | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Creating a TED talk can be as educational as watching one. Students and teachers are taking up this activity to grow new skills and learn more about themselves.

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CreativeCommons-Infographic

CreativeCommons-Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

A good summary/overview of CC licenses and use for photos.


Via C.Rathsack, Rui Guimarães Lima
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jmoreillon's curator insight, Today, 10:10 AM

This is important information for educators/librarians model the ethical use of ideas/information/media and who teach others do so as well.

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, Today, 12:19 PM

Good graphic representation of a complex topic.

Coolwired's curator insight, Today, 5:48 PM

Very informative Infographic!

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MOOCs and Meetups Together Make for Better Learning

MOOCs and Meetups Together Make for Better Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Everyday, thousands of students around the world perch themselves in front of computer screens in homes, libraries, coffee shops, and Internet cafes to take a massive open online course (MOOC).


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Chris Carter's curator insight, April 22, 8:36 PM

Right! It is within the interpersonal relationships that most of us find the motivation to complete a long, challenging task.

Christa Meenan's curator insight, April 23, 9:14 AM

While highlighting the obvious benefits of MOOCs for self-motivated individuals, this aricle does a nice job of also explaining the importance of face-to-face interaction with the instructor for many students to succeed.  Blending MOOCs with other forms of delivery may be a way for MOOCs to move forward with lower dropout rates.

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Learning (Re)Imagined | Graham Brown-Martin | TEDxAmsterdamED (Video)

Learning (Re)Imagined: How the connected society is transforming learning.
Graham is a huge believer in the fact that education will only change by getting more people involved.In this engaging and witty talk packed with images and quotes, Graham discusses his research in Learning (Re)imagined and some of his key conclusions around transformation and learning that include context, environment, engagement, technology and the future.

Graham Brown-Martin is the founder of Learning Without Frontiers (LWF), a global think tank that brought together renowned educators, technologists and creatives to share provocative and challenging ideas about the future of learning. He left LWF in 2013 to pursue new programs and ideas to transform the way we learn, teach and live. Graham spent 2 years researching, travelling, writing and editing video to create the transmedia work, Learning {Re}imagined published by Bloomsbury Academic, 2014.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx


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Open Badges in Professional Development: A Framework

Open Badges in Professional Development: A Framework | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
An Open Badge is a digital representation of a skill or achievement earned from a creditable organization. This session presents a framework for how school districts can leverage open badges to encourage and reward professional growth through non-traditional means. Earned badges can be displayed in professional portfolios, Linkedin profiles, and various social networks like Facebook

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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