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The 7 Styles Of Learning: Which Works For You? - Edudemic

The 7 Styles Of Learning: Which Works For You? - Edudemic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

You love to learn. Your students, colleagues, and parents love to learn. But what kind of styles of learning are most effective for each party? Surely there is no one-size-fits-all approach to learning. After all, we’re seeing a dramatic increase in the number of learning tools made available and they cover an array of learning styles.

 

Read through the following infographic to get a detailed look at the 7 styles of learning. Which is the most effective style for you? What about what works for your students or peers? It might be time to consider that the learning style that works for you may not be the best style for others!

 

 

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Engage Your Learners with Digital Storytelling

Engage Your Learners with Digital Storytelling | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What’s the story, morning glory? What’s the word, hummingbird? Have you heard about Hugo and Kim?” These lyrics from the classic musical Bye Bye Birdie reflect our natural desire for stories and news. Storytelling itself is an age-old art form, but digital storytelling… now that’s big business today. Incorporating digital storytelling into your eLearning content can help you increase learner engagement.
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Four Ways Technology Is Changing How People Learn [Infographic]

Four Ways Technology Is Changing How People Learn [Infographic] | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
eLearning professionals must understand and embrace the meaning and the implications of these changes in the learning process.

Via steve batchelder, Juergen Wagner
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Why the Best Teachers Won't Ditch the Lecture

Why the Best Teachers Won't Ditch the Lecture | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Recently, Stephen Kosslyn, the founding Dean of Minerva Schools, offered a great explanation of why active learning is superior to lectures.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rog Rothe's curator insight, Today, 7:11 PM

I scooped this because I am definitely the "lecture teacher"!  I find that I can best engage my class through stories and antedotes.  I think that it is important to keep that type of communication active in my class. 

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Why is MIT ignorning 25 years of reseach into online learning? | Tony Bates

Why is MIT ignorning 25 years of reseach into online learning? | Tony Bates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Tony Bates: "In my previous post, there were two sessions at the LINC 2013 conference that referred specifically to MIT’s own strategies for technology-enabled learning within MIT. These resulted in my asking the following question towards the end of the conference:

 

Why is MIT ignoring 25 years of research into online learning and 100 years research into how students learn in its design of online courses? "


Via Dennis T OConnor, Peter Mellow
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

Dennis's comments on this issue are very good. This article and his comments are well worth a read.

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elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, Today, 4:54 AM

Dennis's comments on this issue are very good. This article and his comments are well worth a read.

Jeffrey Jablonski, Ph.D.'s curator insight, Today, 10:01 AM

It's more complex that 'nerds vs. educators' but sometimes it does feel like the MOOC revolution is driven by the hardware & software with little regard for the hard won and deeply researched lessons learned since the days when online learning was considered the Devil's stepchild.

 

Bate knows online learning as well as anyone on the planet. With the entrepreneur-tech-ed pundits listen?  Obviously not. 8-(

Frank J. Klein's curator insight, Today, 10:29 AM

It's more complex that 'nerds vs. educators' but sometimes it does feel like the MOOC revolution is driven by the hardware & software with little regard for the hard won and deeply researched lessons learned since the days when online learning was considered the Devil's stepchild.

 

Bate knows online learning as well as anyone on the planet. With the entrepreneur-tech-ed pundits listen?  Obviously not. 8-(

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How to Optimize Your Blog for Content Distribution

How to Optimize Your Blog for Content Distribution | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Good content is great to have, but it doesn’t mean much if no one sees it. You’re putting in all the work; you want all the shares, media pickup, and unique visitors you can get.

If you’re running a blog, are you sure it’s optimized for distribution? Even in this modern Web-publishing era, too many blogs are woefully behind the times: broken social counters, no CTAS, the list goes on. To make sure you’re publishing the right way, check out these tips to optimize your blog for content distribution...


Via Lauren Moss
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Marco Favero's curator insight, Today, 2:57 AM

aggiungere la vostra comprensione ...

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, Today, 9:50 AM

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Memory problems? Go climb a tree. | KurzweilAI

Memory problems? Go climb a tree. | KurzweilAI | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Climbing a tree or balancing on a beam can dramatically improve cognitive skills, according to a study recently conducted by researchers in the Department of Psychology at the University of North Florida.

The study is the first to show that proprioceptively dynamic activities like climbing a tree, done over a short period of time, have dramatic working memory benefits.

Working memory (the ability to process and recall information), is linked to performance in a wide variety of contexts from grades to sports. Proprioception (awareness of body positioning and orientation) is also associated with working memory.

The results of this research, led by Ross Alloway, a research associate, and Tracy Alloway, an associate professor, recently published in Perceptual and Motor Skills, suggest that working-memory improvements can be made in just a couple of hours with these physical exercises.

The aim of this study was to see if proprioceptive activities completed over a short period of time can enhance working memory performance, and whether an acute and highly intensive period of exercise would yield working memory gains.

The UNF researchers recruited adults ages 18 to 59 and tested their working memory. Next, they undertook proprioceptively dynamic activities, designed by the company Movnat, which required proprioception and at least one other element, such as locomotion or route planning.

Working memory capacity increase of 50 percent; better than yoga

Via Wildcat2030
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Striving for excellence in tertiary teaching - Volume 2


Via Peter Mellow
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 30, 11:13 AM

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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Amazing Science
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Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking Want to Save the World From Killer Robots on the Battlefield

Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking Want to Save the World From Killer Robots on the Battlefield | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking are among the leaders from the science and technology worlds calling for a ban on autonomous weapons, warning that weapons with a mind of their own "would not be beneficial for humanity."


Along with 1,000 other signatories, Musk and Hawking signed their names to an open letter that will be presented this week at the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Buenos Aires, Argentina.


Autonomous weapons are defined by the group as artillery that can "search for and eliminate people meeting certain pre-defined criteria, but do not include cruise missiles or remotely piloted drones for which humans make all targeting decisions."


 

Why You Might Not Have to Fear RobotsWhat Elon Musk Says Could Be More Dangerous Than Nuclear WeaponsGoogle Paves the Way to a Robotic Future  

 

"Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology has reached a point where the deployment of such systems is -- practically if not legally -- feasible within years, not decades, and the stakes are high: autonomous weapons have been described as the third revolution in warfare, after gunpowder and nuclear arms," the letter, posted on the Future of Life Institute's website says.


If one country pushes ahead with the creation of robotic killers, the group wrote it fears it will spur a global arms race that could spell disaster for humanity.


"Autonomous weapons are ideal for tasks such as assassinations, destabilizing nations, subduing populations and selectively killing a particular ethnic group," the letter says. "We therefore believe that a military AI arms race would not be beneficial for humanity. There are many ways in which AI can make battlefields safer for humans, especially civilians, without creating new tools for killing people."


While the group warns of the potential carnage killer robots could inflict, they also stress they aren't against certain advances in artificial intelligence.


"We believe that AI has great potential to benefit humanity in many ways, and that the goal of the field should be to do so," the letter says. "Starting a military AI arms race is a bad idea, and should be prevented by a ban on offensive autonomous weapons beyond meaningful human control."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Educational Technology News
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A Teacher’s Guide to Wikipedia

A Teacher’s Guide to Wikipedia | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Many students start their research process on Wikipedia. Not because they’re being defiant, but because the site comes up first in many online searches.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 29, 6:11 PM

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basil60's curator insight, July 30, 5:26 PM

Personally, I've never had a problem with Wikipedia. They issue less errata than Brittanica!

Kathie Turner's curator insight, July 30, 8:29 PM

Wikipedia is your friend!  No need to ban your students from using it,  just tell them to use other databases and websites as well. 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Moodle and Web 2.0
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Full-View Screen Sharing For Google Hangouts

Full-View Screen Sharing For Google Hangouts | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Hangouts is an amazing way of being able to communicate with anyone from anywhere. The thumbnail photos used to take over the bottom right hand side of the screen when sharing.  Sometimes, this made it hard to view the entire screen.  Like so: Now, when you share content through Screen Sharing during a presentation in Keep Reading ..

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Juergen Wagner
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Mirror-Touch Synesthesia: This Doctor Knows Exactly How You Feel

Mirror-Touch Synesthesia: This Doctor Knows Exactly How You Feel | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Dr. Salinas himself has a rare medical condition, one that stands in marked contrast to his patients’: While Josh appeared unresponsive even to his own sensations, Salinas is peculiarly attuned to the sensations of others. If he sees someone slapped across the cheek, Salinas feels a hint of the slap against his own cheek. A pinch on a stranger’s right arm might become a tickle on his own. “If a person is touched, I feel it, and then I recognize that it’s touch,” Salinas says.

The condition is called mirror-touch synesthesia, and it has aroused significant interest among neuroscientists in recent years because it appears to be an extreme form of a basic human trait. In all of us, mirror neurons in the premotor cortex and other areas of the brain activate when we watch someone else’s behaviors and actions. Our brains map the regions of the body where we see someone else caressed, jabbed, or whacked, and they mimic just a shade of that feeling on the same spots on our own bodies. For mirror-touch synesthetes like Salinas, that mental simulacrum is so strong that it crosses a threshold into near-tactile sensation, sometimes indistinguishable from one’s own. Neuroscientists regard the condition as a state of “heightened empathic ability.”

This might sound like a superpower of sorts, a mystical connection between one person’s subjective experience and another’s. But to be clear, Salinas cannot read minds. He doesn’t know whether Josh felt the impact of the reflex hammer, and the tingling in his kneecap says more about his own extraordinary nervous system than it does about that of his patient. What’s more, for those who experience mirror-touch synesthesia—an estimated 1.6 percent of the general population—the condition is often more debilitating than it is empowering.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Learnification Of Gaming

Learnification Of Gaming | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Gamification of learning is a well known concept; we use artifacts known from games to motivate people to learn. In this article I would like to discuss a contradictory idea: Learnification of gaming. Thinking about it I am wondering how we can better use games for by-the-way learning.
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The Power of Big Data and Learning Analytics

The Power of Big Data and Learning Analytics | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Thinking Outside the Box with Higher Ed Big Data

Other colleges and universities buoy student outcomes through even more creative means. Some advise students on their majors by analyzing past course grades to predict future success; others turn data from learning management systems into heat maps that indicate whether students are cramming for class or consistently engaging with coursework.

Ball State University in Indiana uses Big Data to keep an eye on student involvement in campus life activities, which studies indicate are an important success factor. The institution tracks student attendance to campus-sponsored parties through ID cards. If a student’s participation drops, a retention specialist may step in to identify obstacles and offer support.

Further optimizing the college experience, learning analytics and Big Data allow professors to better support struggling students by personalizing the learning process and adapting their teaching when necessary. Institutions can then set and maintain data-driven performance metrics to hold professors accountable for student achievements and failures.
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7 Common Mistakes About Open Online Education

7 Common Mistakes About Open Online Education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"Here are my top 7 mistakes that pundits and critics make when they talk about open online education"


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, Today, 9:41 AM

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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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What to do when your computer is infected

What to do when your computer is infected | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Is your computer infected with malware? Here are 10 quick and easy steps to clean up your PC and get it running right again.

Via Luke Allen, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Assessment | Learning and Teaching | Coaching
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Swoodle- A Great App for Co-editing Documents ~...

Swoodle- A Great App for Co-editing Documents ~... | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Swoodle- A Great App for Co-editing Documents ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on Educational Technology Info curated by MrTVaughn

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Ines Bieler
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7 everyday ways you are ruining your IQ

7 everyday ways you are ruining your IQ | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
According to experts, everything from technology to our eating habits - and ultimately modern life itself - are eroding our brains

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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What’s the point of education if Google can tell us anything?

What’s the point of education if Google can tell us anything? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Such debate about the place and purpose of online searching in learning and assessments is not new. But rather than thinking of ways to prevent students from cheating or plagiarising in their assessed pieces of work, maybe our obsession with the “authenticity” of their coursework or assessment is missing another important educational point.
Digital content curators

In my recent research looking at the ways students write their assignments, I found that increasingly they may not always compose written work which is truly “authentic”, and that this may not be as important as we think. Instead, through prolific use of the internet, students engaged in a number of sophisticated practices to search, sift, critically evaluate, anthologise and re-present pre-existing content. Through a close examination of the moment-by-moment work of the way students write assignments, I came to see how all the pieces of text students produced contained elements of something else. These practices need to be better understood and then incorporated into new forms of education and assessment.

These online practices are about harnessing an abundance of information from a multitude of sources, including search engines like Google, in what I call a form of “digital content curation”. Curation in this sense is about how learners use existing content to produce new content through engaging in problem-solving and intellectual inquiry, and creating a new experience for readers.
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Future Thoughts (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Future Thoughts (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
This is a difficult time in higher education. Students, parents, and policymakers are all questioning the cost/benefit of a college degree. They want to see better access, more relevant teaching models, and the support to ensure completion in a reasonable timeframe. New technologies like MOOCs and online distance learning were developed in an effort to revitalize a centuries-old educational model, to provide access and flexibility. Although it's clear that many improvements are needed, some existing educational models remain relevant.

The integration of technologies such as MOOCs, lecture-capture systems, and video telepresence has broadened students' access and choice and made education more "location agnostic." But there's still a major challenge in creating high-quality, engaging, and seamless experiences for online and distance learning students and educators. Most institutions are not there yet, which means that traditional face-to-face learning models in higher education will continue. Digital learning materials such as e-books have worked to reduce costs and provide a more personalized learning experience, yet studies show that millennials prefer reading from print books for both deep reading and enjoyment.1 For this reason, I don't see traditional books going away anytime soon.

Yes, technology's role in education will continue to grow, but so will the significance of face-to-face learning. Teaching is less dependent on one teacher delivering content in broadcast mode to students sitting in rows of chairs while quietly listening and taking notes. Teaching today needs to provide students with the opportunity to acquire skills in critical thinking, problem solving, analysis, and creativity, as well as the soft skills employers require in the workplace: interpersonal, collaborative, and presentation skills. Effectively teaching these higher-level cognitive and soft skills is difficult to do remotely; thus, the need for physical learning spaces will continue to be crucial. With the more active integration of technology, the educator's role will continue to expand outside of content delivery, allowing more time for interacting with and mentoring students.
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

"Studies show that millennials prefer reading from print books for both deep reading and enjoyment"

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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 30, 11:12 AM

"Estudos mostram que millennials preferem a leitura de livros impressos para ambos profunda leitura e diversão"

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning and Teaching in an Online Environment
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Striving for excellence in tertiary teaching - Volume 1


Via Peter Mellow
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The True Power of MOOCs May Have Been Accidental

The True Power of MOOCs May Have Been Accidental | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Free online college courses haven't sparked the higher-ed revolution advocates envisioned, but perhaps they could reform education in a way that was largely unintentional.

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, July 29, 12:30 PM

MOOCs as PD. Interesting. I was one of the educators who took the "Leaders in Learning" MOOC mentioned in the article! It was a great course. 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
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The Beginning of the End of Traditional Higher Education

The Beginning of the End of Traditional Higher Education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Once employers start seeing qualified candidates with alternative educational backgrounds, the ability of the four-year colleges to hold students hostage to increasingly worthless degrees will gradually weaken. Then, the traditional academic institutions can choose to evolve or perish.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Tony Guzman's curator insight, July 30, 9:40 AM

In this opinion piece the author shares why they believe that higher education is on "it's last legs". Agree or disagree?

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Education 2.0 & 3.0
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What If the U.S. Treated Teaching Like It Treats Professional Sports?

What If the U.S. Treated Teaching Like It Treats Professional Sports? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
At the end of the summer, teachers across the country will return to work. They’ll clean off old desks in poorly lit classrooms, filled with supplies paid for with their own paychecks.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Effective Learning Design: The 6 Engagement Factors

Effective Learning Design: The 6 Engagement Factors | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Designing and developing learning that helps drive end-user engagement is always a goal, and at times, a lofty one! Sometimes the content itself is so completely boring that it's hard to design an experience that leads to a truly rewarding activity. However, even with the most dreadful compliance content or regulatory and/or safety content, there are factors you can employ to help you take even the most boring or complicated topics and turn them into more engaging experiences. And remember: huma

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, July 29, 5:01 PM

Some important things to remember whether teaching online or face-to-face. 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from The future of medicine and health
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Why your brain acts like a jazz band - Futurity

Why your brain acts like a jazz band - Futurity | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The human brain improvises while its rhythm section keeps up a steady beat. But when it comes to taking on intellectually challenging tasks, groups of neurons tune in to one another for a fraction of a second and harmonize, then go back to improvising, according to new research.

These findings, reported in the journal Nature Neuroscience, could pave the way for more targeted treatments for people with brain disorders marked by fast, slow, or chaotic brain waves, also known as neural oscillations.

Tracking the changing rhythms of the healthy human brain at work advances our understanding of such disorders as Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and even autism, which are characterized in part by offbeat brain rhythms. In jazz lingo, for example, bands of neurons in certain mental illnesses may be malfunctioning because they’re tuning in to blue notes, or playing double time or half time.
“The human brain has 86 billion or so neurons all trying to talk to each other in this incredibly messy, noisy, and electrochemical soup,” says study lead author Bradley Voytek. “Our results help explain the mechanism for how brain networks quickly come together and break apart as needed.”

Via Wildcat2030
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