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How Using Social Media Affects Your Brain - Edudemic

How Using Social Media Affects Your Brain - Edudemic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Wondering how social media affects your brain? You're not alone. The usage of the top sites has had a measured effect you should know about!

So what exactly would you give up to keep your access to social media free of boundaries? Studies show that more and more often, younger generations will say that having regular access to social media at work is more important to them than what their salary is.

In fact, some would-be employees say that, if they can’t login to Facebook on the job, then the position isn’t worth it. So what’s so important about social media that we value it more than our jobs? The following infographic takes a look at how much we love social media, and why.
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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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MOOCs and Open Education Around the World

MOOCs and Open Education Around the World | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Bonk, C. J., Lee. M. M., Reeves, T. C., & Reynolds, T. H. (2015). Preface: Actions leading to “MOOCs and Open Education Around the World.” In Bonk, Lee., Reeves, & Reynolds, T. H. (Eds.), MOOCs & Open Ed Around the World. Routledge

Via Peter Mellow
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8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome

8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The 8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome Infographic presents the usefulness of badges as indicators of skills learned inside or outside the classroom.

Via EDTC@UTB, WebTeachers
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Philippe-Didier Gauthier's curator insight, Today, 2:07 AM

#ePortfolio #OpenBadges  On a apas fini de découvrir les potentialités des badges !!!!

Armando's curator insight, Today, 5:41 AM

8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome

Steve Whitmore's curator insight, Today, 9:19 AM

Thinking through the badge idea in Professional Learning...

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The psychology of simple

The psychology of simple | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
For a concept that we all understand, ‘simple’ is deceivingly difficult to pin down.

We may ‘know it when we see it’, but there’s more to what makes a product or website feel simple than just gut reaction.

In the words of Steve Jobs:

“Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains.”

If there’s so much power in creating things that are simple why do so many of us miss the mark?

Why is simple so, well, complex?
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Creating A Fire For Inquiry Starts At The Beginning

Creating A Fire For Inquiry Starts At The Beginning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
If science is inquiry and inquiry is a fire, when does that fire start?

When the world talks about STEM education for the most part they talk around elementary teachers rather than to elementary school teachers. This should not be seen as an insult or slur upon our value, but as a matter of course. Most “real” science does not start until middle school or even high school, and for school in poverty perhaps not even then. However, with the need to develop more students ready to step into STEM careers, and the corresponding efforts to grow educational foundations in those area elementary science will play a pivotal role.

Via John Evans
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7 Tips For Integrating Lessons With Social Media - Indiana Jen

7 Tips For Integrating Lessons With Social Media - Indiana Jen | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Social media has the power to take what students enjoy and extend lessons that offer students real world applications. Instilling a love of learning is no easy task, especially in a world that is constantly changing with fancier and brighter screens. Our students’ fascination with technology makes it important for educators to integrate lessons and increase classroom participation by embracing our children’s favorite means of expression: social media.

Via John Evans
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How I lost my faith in the LMS (or ‘my journey towards LMS nihilism’)

How I lost my faith in the LMS (or ‘my journey towards LMS nihilism’) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There were, I believe, a variety of reasons that Moodle was so successful during this time, but one of the most common things that I would hear during this period was that, compared to incumbent LMS, Moodle simply ‘got out of the way’ and let academic staff do their thing. It helped the LMS stop being a barrier, and moved it closer to being an enabler, which is exactly what was needed at the time.

During this time Moodle was booming in popularity, and the transitions I was involved in by and large went as well as any other campus-wide technology platform change can, but one big question (and I must send out a thank you my friend and sounding board James Hamilton for planting this seed) was lurking in the background – how do we measure the success of the implementation? How do we know that the LMS in and of itself is making any difference whatsoever in terms of learning outcomes for students?

Now, one thing I’m not criticising here is any one LMS, nor am I suggesting that the LMS as a concept hasn’t had a huge impact on education since it arrived on the scene. They all have their strengths and weaknesses. They have all supported blended and fully online learning since the dawn of e-time. The question that started to dog me was whether there was any material difference in the learning outcomes for students based on the use of any one LMS over another in the current crop of major players?

My thoughts – absolutely not.

Possibly one of my first conscious moments of thinking this was when I saw this post from Tomaz Lasic, someone I rate extremely highly as an educator, innovator, technologist and human being. In short, it used the Moodle wiki tool as a Monopoly board to facilitate learning for school aged students. It was simple, effective, elegant and on a personal level quite inspiring. Now for those of you who have not used the Moodle wiki, you could describe it in many ways – ‘sophisticated’, ‘best-in-breed’ or ‘fully functional’ would not be any of them. When I saw Tomaz’ use of the Moodle wiki, which as a tool was far more rudimentary back then than it is now, I was given a brutal reminder that a good educator will use whatever tools are made available to them to get the job done. True, the LMS helped Tomaz achieve this goal, but if he didn’t have an LMS I have no doubt he would have used some other technology tool, or textas and paper, or a stick scratching on a patch of dirt if he had to. The specific LMS that was in use paled into insignificance next to the innovation, dedication and skill of the person using it.
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

"The LMS could – and perhaps should – withdraw to be nothing more than the operating system for educational tools, but the only vendor I have seen that gets remotely close to this is Instructure, and even then I’ve not seen enough to be convinced that they have helped LTI achieve anywhere near its full potential – yet."

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LMS for Your Organization – How to Select The Best Fit? Part 3: Moodle

LMS for Your Organization – How to Select The Best Fit? Part 3: Moodle | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In the second post of this series, we have seen the about the WordPress option. Here, let us see the second option i.e Moodle (open source LMS).

Moodle

‘Open-source’ LMSs refer to the learning management software whose source code is open to all. The source code of these systems can be edited to meet the needs of organizations, and this makes them very flexible.

An increasing number of companies use open-source LMS to manage their learning activities because of the following reasons:
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Metamodernist Instructional Design and the False Goal of Primacy in MOOCs

Metamodernist Instructional Design and the False Goal of Primacy in MOOCs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

This has been an interesting year in the MOOC discussion realm, with everything from MOOC 4.0 to arguments about who controls the conversation about MOOC research. But a strain that has always seemed to existed in the discussion about MOOCs is the idea of making MOOCs more like a traditional college educational experiences. A recent entry into this stream by the title of “Why is the University Still Here?” caught my eye, and want to address some of the issues that are brought up in this article.

First of all is the idea that “those who wanted to be educated had the means to do so” because of libraries and expensive video lectures. I’m not sure there is much social research that would support that claim, since many people don’t have access to libraries, and even if they do, they run into a complex organizational system that becomes a barrier to entry. If people who wanted education could get it, we are all barking up the wrong tree to improve access in the first place. Why change anything if the people that wanted it can already get it?

Second is the idea that “education is simply not as native an activity for many adults today.” Those that research the blurred line between pedagogy, andragogy, and heutagogy would disagree. People are always learning in many informal and formal ways and always have been – maybe its just that the mainstream of education is finally catching up with this idea. At their most basic levels, the original MOOCs and connectivism tap into the idea that most adults are native to learning and are doing it all the time – its just the formal constructs of behaviorism and constructivism don’t seem to tap into this native learning (for many, many reasons that really have nothing to do with the constructs themselves but the ways many use them).

These two problems lead into the third and biggest issue I have with what the article identifies as the big problems with MOOCs: loss of primacy and motivation.

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Terry Elliott's curator insight, May 21, 6:41 AM

We're here.

We're fearless.

We're failure free.

CLMOOC

 

Now here's the big question this article raises:  "What does it mean when we lose primacy and the threat of grades and failure?"

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8 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Calling Out Kids for Their Bad Behavior - Brilliant or Insane

8 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Calling Out Kids for Their Bad Behavior - Brilliant or Insane | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
If a kid has been pushed to a point where she’s acting out in order to get negative attention, the problem is far bigger than you. You know that, right? I didn’t when I was a young teacher, but when this reality dawned on me, it was a game changer. Realizing that it wasn’t about me gave me enough space to breath a bit before I reacted.

It’s not about you either, I’ll bet. If it is, it might say something about how much the kid who is making you crazy cares about you.

Sometimes, they act out to get your attention.

Sometimes, it’s the only way they know.

Sometimes, admitting what they really think or feel or need requires a level of vulnerability they just aren’t able to conjure.

So, don’t call students out in front of other people. Don’t point out their errors, don’t name their flaws, and by all means, don’t cut them down with your sarcasm. Try to get to the root of the problem, instead. Try asking yourself a few questions.

Via John Evans
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What Makes A Great Teacher?

What Makes A Great Teacher? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Teachers can make a large and positive difference to how well children do at school, but unfortunately, not all teachers do. The reality is that some teachers are far more effective than other teachers.

"Studies that take into account all of the available evidence on teacher effectiveness suggest that students placed with high-performing teachers will progress three times as fast as those placed with low-performing teachers." Barber & Mourshed, 2007

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"Online Learning Gives you Something Different” Says Student accepted into All 8 Ivy Leagues - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

"Online Learning Gives you Something Different” Says Student accepted into All 8 Ivy Leagues - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A US student who studied one of his subjects entirely online has been accepted by all eight of American’s Ivy League schools.

Via Peter Mellow
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Using C.R.A.P Web Design For eLearning

Using C.R.A.P Web Design For eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What does C.R.A.P mean?

C.R.A.P stands for contrast, repetition, alignment and proximity and these are the four principles of design that graphic and visual designers use all the time for websites. Let’s dive straight in and get familiar with how you can apply these principles to elearning.
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The Online Learning Teaching Techniques - eLearning Industry

The Online Learning Teaching Techniques - eLearning Industry | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Why the traditional learning theories do not work

The traditional learning theory of ‘sage on the stage’, also known as passive transmittal learning, emphasizes the teacher as the center of the learning process. It places the responsibility of learning on the transfer of knowledge from the expert (teacher) to the novice (student). Education rooted in the teacher-center approach often uses direct instruction techniques, such as lecture while the students sit and take notes. Given the fundamental design of online learning, namely that the teacher and student are not physically present, there must be a change from this learning paradigm so that each student can be successful in this learning environment.

A student-center approach to learning is often referred to as the teacher being ‘the guide on the side’. While this can be straightforward to imagine in the face-to-face classroom, it is harder to conceptualize in the virtual setting. Teachers in online learning cannot float around the classroom, observing student work, watching student processes, standing ready to offer guidance when errors or misconceptions arise. While this approach places more responsibility on the student, the teacher still sets up the active learning activities and shares in the responsibility. Therefore, even this approach needs to be modified for successful learning to occur in the virtual setting.
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Games vs Game-based Learning vs Gamification | The Upside Learning Blog

Games vs Game-based Learning vs Gamification | The Upside Learning Blog | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The simplest definition of games would be ‘activities in which participants take part for enjoyment, learning or competition’. The chief advantage of games in learning is the drive and engagement they create, and the fun-factor they bring in, that makes a boring task interesting. So, does that mean all games are a part of learning? Probably not. But, games can be designed in a way to deliver learning content, which essentially is Game-based learning.

Confused? Let’s break it down into simpler terms using an example.
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Imperfect Cognitions: Believing against the Evidence

Imperfect Cognitions: Believing against the Evidence | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
This post is by Miriam McCormick, Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Richmond. Miriam presents her new book, Believing Against the Evidence: Agency and the Ethics of Belief (Routledge, 2015).


When I first had a student tell me that she doesn’t believe in evolution I was at a loss of how to respond. To me, that sounded like someone telling me that she didn’t believe in gravity. It seemed both irrational and wrong. Experiences like this are common; we think that one’s actual belief can deviate from how one ought to believe. The dominant view among contemporary philosophers is that any belief formed against the evidence is impermissible. On such a view, which I call “evidentialism,” it is easy to diagnosis what is wrong with my student’s belief. I use the term “pragmatism” to refer to the view that some non-evidentially based beliefs are permissible. A central aim of this book is to defend pragmatism. One challenge to the pragmatist view I defend is to show how we can distinguish pernicious non-evidentially based beliefs from those that are permissible.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Six Top Sources for Free Images, Video, and Audio | Cool Tools - SLJ @rmbyrne

Six Top Sources for Free Images, Video, and Audio | Cool Tools - SLJ @rmbyrne | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
I’ve written about a number of video, audio, and collage creation tools, with WeVideo, Audacity, and PicMonkey topping some of my lists. However, it can be a challenge for students to locate copyright-friendly media when using these tools for presentations or idea sharing. It’s always best for students to create materials or use ones that are in the public domain. Here are some of the best resources I’ve found for the latter.

Via John Evans
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Has Nothing Changed? | Higher Ed Beta | InsideHigherEd

Has Nothing Changed? | Higher Ed Beta | InsideHigherEd | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

A recent article on TechCrunch, a leading provider of technology news, argues that for all the hype, higher ed, as we have known it, is prevailing over the forces for disruption. “After years of efforts,” the author writes, “we have arrived in 2015 and almost nothing seems to have changed about the way we get our degrees or even just our continuing coursework.”

 

As one piece of evidence, the article suggests that enrollment in MOOCs has apparently plateaued. It might also point to the declining enrollment at for-profit universities. Nevertheless, we are, in fact, in the midst of a profound period of transition as public and private universities seek to address a series of challenges. These include:


Via Robert Schuwer, Ebba Ossiannilsson
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Technology in Higher Education: Defining the Strategic Leader (EDUCAUSE Review)

Technology in Higher Education: Defining the Strategic Leader (EDUCAUSE Review) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The working group identified 10 key roles for IT leaders. Figure 1 shows the roles and how they interconnect and influence each other.

At the core of the model is the role of the strategist. To be an effective strategist, the IT leader must understand the organization and provide both information systems and technology leadership that bring to life transformation across the organization.

The inner ring represents three primary roles that successful IT leaders assume. These roles are interdependent, take time to develop, and are perhaps the most difficult to achieve.

* Trusted advisor
* Relationship builder
* Visionary

The outer ring identifies six discrete roles that an IT leader will play. Whereas a successful IT leader typically plays the primary roles consistently and simultaneously, the discrete roles might only be needed at specific times. Many of these roles stem from and relate to the primary roles.

* Change driver
* Promoter and persuader
* Master communicator
* Team builder
* Ambassador
* Coach

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Leanne Chippendale's curator insight, May 21, 5:55 AM

Add this to the many hats we have as teachers. IT the way of the future, of course we must be embassadors and leaders.

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20 Facts About the Impact of E-Learning [#Infographic]

20 Facts About the Impact of E-Learning [#Infographic] | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Online learning has become one of the fastest-growing industries in education technology, and it’s not slowing down anytime soon.

The availability of mobile devices on campuses has drastically changed the playing field for e-learning. By 2020, the global mobile-learning market is on track to reach $37.8 billion, according to a new infographic from TalentLMS, a learning management system. By 2019, half of all college students will be enrolled in online courses.

Via Dennis T OConnor, Peter Mellow
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, May 20, 3:38 PM

The future is bright and filled with change. Are you ready?

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12 Rules Of Great Teaching

12 Rules Of Great Teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

12 Rules Of Great Teaching by Terry Heick Recently, I’ve been thinking of the universal truths in teaching. Students should be first. Don’t always start planning with a standard. Questions matter more than answers. 


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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, May 15, 6:24 PM

Lots of good advice...about how to stay focused on your students.

Helen Teague's curator insight, May 20, 9:31 AM

TeachThought is such a beneficial resource... the graphic used with the rulers is perfect!

Helen Teague's curator insight, May 20, 9:34 AM

TeachThought is such a beneficial resource...the ruler graphic engages interest

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Top 10 Evidence Based Teaching Strategies

Top 10 Evidence Based Teaching Strategies | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Most teachers care about their students’ results, and if you are reading this article, you are undoubtedly one of them.

There is no doubt that teachers make a difference to how well their kids do at school. However, when you explore the thousands of research studies1 on the topic, it is apparent that some teaching strategies have far more impact than other teaching strategies do.
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

Slides at http://www.slideshare.net/shaunkillian18/top-10-evidence-based-teaching-strategies

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When Should You Choose Self-Paced Learning vs Live Online Learning?

When Should You Choose Self-Paced Learning vs Live Online Learning? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
While many organizations and eLearning institutions might naturally assume that the most important aspect of any educational platform is the content, this is not necessarily the case. While the information users will be receiving is all-important, how you deliver that information can make a world of difference in terms of knowledge acquisition and retention.

As such, selecting just the right implementation method is key. So, the question is: when should an organization choose self-paced learning versus live online learning?

In this article, we’ll discuss the basics and benefits of both methods, and discuss some of the things you may want to take into consideration when choosing the implementation strategy that’s right for your organization.
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Carol Bently's curator insight, May 20, 4:59 AM

e-learning is right

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Cloud Education: The Future of Learning, The Forum - BBC World Service

Cloud Education: The Future of Learning, The Forum - BBC World Service | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

What are the big challenges in education around the World? How do we ensure everyone learns to the best of their ability? Is new technology the answer? And what does it mean for teachers and pupils?


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 20, 1:45 AM

Some interesting viewing.

Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, May 20, 3:11 PM

Cloud Education, what does it mean for teachers and pupils?  Will this be the future?