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The top 20 data visualisation tools | Feature | .net magazine

The top 20 data visualisation tools | Feature | .net magazine | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
From simple charts to complex maps and infographics, Brian Suda's round-up of the best – and mostly free – tools has everything you need to bring your data to life...

 

20 different tools for creating visualisations: from simple charts to complex graphs, maps and infographics. Almost everything here is available for free, and some you have probably installed already.

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Peer Instruction for Active Learning - Eric Mazur

Harvard University Prof. Eric Mazur on difficulties of beginners, teaching each other, and making sense of information.

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The Evolution of Technology in Schools Infographic

The Evolution of Technology in Schools Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There’ve been several significant advancements in educational technology over the past few years. From filmstrips to tablets and learning management systems, technology keeps changing in an extremely fast pace and reshaping the way everyone views education. Webanywhere have created The Evolution of Technology in Schools Infographic to illustrate some significant technological innovations for the classroom through the years.

Check out the list below:
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A friend of a friend

A friend of a friend | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Facebook has recently claimed that it has reduced the degrees of separation between people. This claim is based on its analysis of the personal data it has collated from its 1.6 billion subscribers. If you are a subscriber to Facebook (and there aren't many people around that I know who aren't), then your data is included in this massive calculation exercise.

The original idea of six degrees of separation has been with us for some time but was popularised by the American psychologist Stanley Milgram in the 1960s (remember him also from the electric shock experiments?) through his small world experiment. It was proposed that every person is no more than 6 social connections (or degrees of separation) away from anyone else on the planet. If you choose any random person, the theory goes, then they will be a friend of a friend of a friend of a friend of a friend (or perhaps less) with them. Back in 2012, I predicted that the era of social media would reduce that degrees of separation. Earlier, in 2009 I suggested that it might even be reduced to one or two degrees of separation. Now Facebook has demonstrated that amongst its users at least, that statistic has been reduced to an average of around 3.5 - but bear in mind this applies only to its subscribers.

What this means for our society has yet to be revealed and time will tell whether our increased connections to each other will be a benefit or a danger. As Mark Zuckerberg has said 'When people connect, powerful things happen and lives are changed.' That's probably true in many cases, but whether those powerful things that happen change lives for the better or for the worse, depends on with whom you decide to connect.
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A Biologically Inspired Model of Distributed Online Communication Supporting Efficient Search and Diffusion of Innovation


Via Complexity Digest
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