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How do I know that all of this was real? The dark side of being a digital stranger in an online learning environment – Part 2 | Peter Bryant

How do I know that all of this was real? The dark side of being a digital stranger in an online learning environment – Part 2 | Peter Bryant | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

I have been actively engaged online for nearly 17 years from bulletin boards, to IRC and now onto any number of social media platforms. It has been a continual cycle of experience and appropriation and evaluation. Most of it has been enjoyable and satisfying. Some of it has been painful, traumatic and cathartic. There have been moments of inspiration, of creativity and of disappointment and body shaking laughter. I have made friends, partners, enemies and colleagues. That lived life informs how I design and develop a programme especially where there is some blended or online component. I am also 42. I am cogniscent of the fact that modes of interactivity are neither uniform nor agreed across all users, and that there are significant differences between age groups, context of usage and device preference. But I am also aware that many of my own experiences would not have happened in real life. It took both the emancipatory and the disinhibiting nature of social media to facilitate much of those experiences. In part 1, I looked at three of John Suler’s considerations for what he termed the ‘online disinhibition effect’, a way of understanding some of the darker aspects of online interaction. In part 2, I would like to explore three more; invisibility, dissociative imagination and minimisation of status and authority.

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Steps to Create the Conditions for Deep, Rigorous, Applied Learning

Steps to Create the Conditions for Deep, Rigorous, Applied Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Many school administrators, teachers and parents want the education provided to children to be high quality, rigorous and connected to the world outside the classroom. Teachers are trying to provide these elements in various ways, but a group of schools calling itself the “Deeper Learning Network” has codified some of what its members believe are essential qualities of deep learning (check out how students lead parent teacher conferences in this model). Some of the goals include learning designated content, critical thinking, communication skills, collaborating effectively and connecting learning to real-world experiences.

To better understand what schools in the Deeper Learning Network were doing differently, Monica Martinez and Dennis McGrath visited several schools and wrote a book about what they found: “Deeper Learning How Eight Innovative Public Schools Are Transforming Education in the Twenty-First Century.” They’ve also put together a guide to help interested educators create the conditions necessary to make this model thrive. As the infographic below shows, the model requires a big shift from traditional school and rests on positive school culture and collaborative professional teams of teachers who are committed to the vision of the school.

The introduction to the guide makes the immensity of the task clear: “The Guide offers a framework for planning that addresses the reality that school transformation is an incredibly challenging task that will not work as a top-down mandate and requires time, collective effort, and a shared focus on vision and goals.” The authors hope it will be a resource for educators looking to start this type of transformation, but who are uncertain how to get started.
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Stephen Downes: Half an Hour: Ten Key Takeaways from Tony Bates

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour: Ten Key Takeaways from Tony Bates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Like pretty much everyone else in the field I've been immensely enjoying Tony Bates's work-in-progress, an online open textbook called Teaching in a Digital Age.

Having said that, I think my perspective is very different from his, and this summary post offers me an opportunity to highlight some of those differences. So in what follows, the key points (in italics) are his, while the text that follows is my discussion.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 23, 1:18 AM

Two strong points of view: bound to trigger your thinking!

Cheryl Frose's curator insight, February 26, 12:35 PM

Lots to think about!

Ann Luzeckyj's curator insight, February 26, 5:26 PM

Not strictly related to first year but interesting 

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Faculty, Mobilize for Equity! - Hybrid Pedagogy

The whole theory of modern education is radically unsound. Fortunately in England, at any rate, education produces no effect whatsoever. If it did, it would prove a serious danger to the upper classes, and probably lead to acts of violence in Grosvenor Square. What is your income?” ~ Oscar Wilde’s formidable Lady Bracknell in “The Importance of Being Earnest,” Act I.

And how about traditional higher education in America? What is our income?
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Human-machine symbiosis: Software that augments human thinking

Human-machine symbiosis: Software that augments human thinking | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The IBM computer Deep Blue’s 1997 defeat of world champion Garry Kasparov is one of the most famous events in chess history. But Kasparov himself and some computer scientists believe a more significant result occurred in 2005—and that it should guide how we use technology to make decisions and get work done.


In an unusual online tournament, two U.S. amateurs armed with three PCs snatched a $20,000 prize from a field of supercomputers and grandmasters. The victors’ technology and chess skills were plainly inferior. But they had devised a way of working that created a greater combined intelligence—one in which humans provided insight and intuition, and computers brute-force predictions.


Some companies are now designing software to foster just such man-machine combinations. One that owes its success to this approach is Palantir, a rapidly growing software company in Palo Alto, California, known for its close connections to intelligence agencies. Shyam Sankar, director of forward deployed engineering at the company, says Palantir’s founders became devotees while at PayPal, where they designed an automated system to flag fraudulent transactions. “It catches 80 percent of the fraud, the dumb fraud, but it’s not clever enough for the most sophisticated criminals,” says Sankar.


PayPal ended up creating software to enable humans to hunt for that toughest 20 percent themselves, in the form of a suite of analysis tools that allowed them to act on their own insights about suspicious activity in vast piles of data rather than wait for automated systems to discover it. Palantir, which received funding from the CIA, now sells similar data-analysis software to law enforcement, banks, and other industries.


Sankar describes Palantir’s goal as fostering “human-computer symbiosis,” a term adapted from J.C.R. Licklider, a psychologist and computer scientist who published a prescient essay on the topic in 1960. Sankar contrasts that with what he calls the “AI bias” now dominant in the tech industry. “We focus on helping humans investigate hypotheses,” says Sankar. That’s only possible if analysts have tools that let them creatively examine data from every angle in search of those “aha” moments.

 

In practice, Palantir’s software gives the user tools to explore interconnected data and tries to present the information visually, often as maps that track to how people think. One bank bought the software in order to detect rogue employees stealing or leaking sensitive information. The detective work was guided by when and where employees badged into buildings, and by records of their digital activities on the company’s network. “This is contrary to automated decision making, when an algorithm figures everything out based on past data,” says Ari Gesher, a Palantir engineer. “That works great. Except when the adversary is changing. And many classes of modern problems do have this adaptive adversary in the mix.”


Palantir’s devotion to human–computer symbiosis seems to be working. The nine-year-old company now has 1,200 employees and is expanding into new industries such as health care. Forbes estimated that it was on course for revenues of $450 million in 2013.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff - Edutopia

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff - Edutopia | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved.

However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff.

Via John Evans
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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Via callooh, Dennis T OConnor
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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, February 25, 5:45 PM

Well done mindmap about learning theories.

Richard Whiteside's curator insight, February 27, 4:53 AM

Really useful mindmap with links to further info about the theories and theorists. Shame it isn't in an easily downloadable format.

Cris Mepham's curator insight, February 27, 6:52 AM

If you need a few ideas!

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European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning

European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Infographic presents types of activities and grading and feedback criteria to help you plan better assessments.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Barbara Macfarlan's curator insight, February 24, 6:29 PM

This is a clear guide to help teachers think about their assessment practice.

Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, February 25, 3:09 AM

A clear and useful list of activities for assessment.

Karen Molineaux's curator insight, February 25, 8:06 PM

This is a pretty good infographic that serves as a guide when trying to decide what type of activity and grading to do when addressing Bloom's...

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Learner-Centered Pedagogy and the Fear of Losing Control

Learner-Centered Pedagogy and the Fear of Losing Control | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
But near the end of the semester, two of the brightest students in the course asked to see me. When we met, they asked a very simple question: “What happened to the course we loved at the beginning of the semester?” I asked them to explain. They recalled wistfully the excitement of doing research and reporting what they had found, listening to their peers reports and the dynamic exchanges between students about provinces they had studied. They confessed that the lectures had been difficult to follow, and even harder to record in note form. Half the time they had difficulty making connections or understanding the narrative that I had condensed from the sources I had used. By the end of the conversation, they communicated a message I have never forgotten: we want to learn, and not be taught.

Looking back on that experience, I realize that it reflects a pitfall many professors fall into: mistaking “teaching” with “learning.” In my insecurity and desire to control the contact time, I dominated the classroom and filled it with the fruits of my own learning, rather than creating an experience that would enable my students to learn effectively. Those two brave students (grades had not been assigned!) helped me realize that my job is to facilitate learning. That means creating learner-centered experiences, and not classrooms dominated by the instructor’s (my) fear of losing control.
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25 Ways to Develop a Growth Mindset - InformED

25 Ways to Develop a Growth Mindset - InformED | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"In one world, effort is a bad thing. It, like failure, means you’re not smart or talented. If you were, you wouldn’t need effort. In the other world, effort is what makes you smart or talented." Carol Dweck


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 22, 10:13 PM

Carol Dweck has been studying mindset for many years, and this post shares information from her work. There is a discussion on growth mindset and fixed mindset as well as a discussion on how a growth mindset can help one learn (which also shares information from some of her research).

This is followed by a list of 25 ways to help students develop a growth mindset. Five are listed below.

* Acknowledge and embrace imperfections.

* View challenges as opportunities.

* Follow the research on brain plasticity.

* Value the process over the end result.

* Provide regular opportunities for reflection.

What would happen if your class or your school chose one suggestion a week and had it become a part of the school culture? Would students learn more about growth mindset and be more willing to take risks? To understand that everyone fails at different points in their life, but they have the ability to move on (and potentially share information about people who have failed and led a successful life)?  What are your thoughts on this subject?

And remember to click through to the post to see all 25 suggestions (as well as links to additional resources).

diane gusa's comment, February 23, 1:15 PM
always a well curated link!
Richard Varey's curator insight, February 23, 2:40 PM

In this sense, I think that 'enrichment' is a better term than growth, since the latter implies that quantity matters above quality.

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Corrective Feedback : User the language power tools to process your assignments

Corrective Feedback : User the language power tools to process your assignments | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Teachers sometimes hesitate to assign writing tasks because of the correction work it creates. However, students benefit from frequent writing practice and the corrective feedback they receive. One solution is for teachers to work longer hours. Another is to find ways to integrate automatic corrective feedback into second language pedagogy.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, February 23, 8:24 AM

This looks like a great tool to support the marking of written work and give students detailed and supportive feedback which they can actually take forward.Worth watching the introductory video: http://youtu.be/Wu0TMqPfW_0

Johan van der Merwe's curator insight, February 25, 5:04 AM

Useful for marking written work

Bulara Monyaki's curator insight, February 27, 9:03 AM

Yes. Corrective feedback should help develop students' writing

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The Brain’s Way of Healing by Norman Doidge review – a book of miracles

The Brain’s Way of Healing by Norman Doidge review – a book of miracles | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
An absorbing compendium of unlikely recoveries from physical and mental ailments offers evidence that the brain can heal the body

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Brain myths busted

Brain myths busted | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Let’s look at some myths that have been circulating about the brain

 

These disciplines have been around in some form since ancient times, so you’d think that by now we’d know all there is to know about the brain. Nothing could be further from the truth. After thousands of years of studying and treating every aspect of it, there are still many facets of the brain that remain mysterious. And because the brain is so complex, we tend to simplify information about how it works in order to make it more understandable. Both of these things put together have resulted in many myths about the brain reports science.howstuffworks.com. Most aren’t completely off — we just haven’t quite heard the whole story. Let’s look at some myths that have been circulating about the brain, starting with, of all things, its colour.
Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, February 27, 8:12 PM

An Indian news site has a go at listing some contemporary brain myths.  It includes: learning through subconscious messages. listening to Mozart makes you smarter and alcohol kills the brain. Nice effort.

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Sign up for a new online course on interactive data visualization for the web using D3.js

Sign up for a new online course on interactive data visualization for the web using D3.js | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
If you want to go beyond the basics of working on pre-built charts and start to learn how to merge design and web development to create fully customized interactive visualizat

Via Peter Mellow
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New generation of teachers faces digital age that can be short on forgiveness

New generation of teachers faces digital age that can be short on forgiveness | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
"If we want to understand the world of our youth, we have to extend ourselves into their digital spaces," Couros said.

Safety and potential hazards only comprise a small chunk of total digital citizenship.

Other elements include communication, rights and responsibilities, etiquette and literacy.

Via Peter Mellow
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Will Professors teach differently in 10 Years?

Will Professors teach differently in 10 Years? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The universities must not only reward and promote innovations in the teaching methodologies, but must also provide teacher development programs, in order to cultivate and support new educational approaches.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 26, 5:17 PM

Good to think about this issue now and plan for it...

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What do we mean by quality when teaching in a digital age? | Tony Bates

What do we mean by quality when teaching in a digital age? | Tony Bates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The aim of this chapter is to provide some practical guidelines for teachers and instructors to ensure quality teaching in a digital age. Before I can do this, however, it is necessary to clarify what is meant by ‘quality’ in education, because I am using ‘quality’ here in a very specific way.

 

Definitions

Probably there is no other topic in education which generates so much discussion and controversy as ‘quality’. Many books have been written on the topic, but I will cut to the chase and give my definition of quality up-front. For the purposes of this book, quality is defined as:

teaching methods that successfully help learners develop the knowledge and skills they will require in a digital age.

- See more at: http://www.tonybates.ca/2015/02/23/what-do-we-mean-by-quality-when-teaching-in-a-digital-age/comment-page-1/#comment-1668810

 


Via Harvey Mellar
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Browse articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience

Browse articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Browse a list of resources, articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience.

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Trends in distance education research: A content analysis of journals 2009-2013 | Bozkurt | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

Trends in distance education research: A content analysis of journals 2009-2013 | Bozkurt | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Trends in distance education research: A content analysis of journals 2009-2013

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Exploring the potential of badging: Badges = engagement + data

Slidecast of invited spotlight session at Florida Distance Learning Association 2013 Annual Conference

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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New Learning, New Society - by Stephen Downes

Talk given to the Chang School at Ryerson University outline the weakness of traditional models of online learning and arguing instead for a student-centered and self-organized system.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Guidelines for Designing Professional Development

Guidelines for Designing Professional Development | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

I'm in the midst of planning massive set of upcoming workshops, institutes and trainings. I love designing these things, thinking through the flow of activities, the structures to guide people deep into the work, and the opportunities to model new ways of learning and doing. It takes me between one to two hours to plan for every hour of PD I facilitate -- yes, it takes a lot of time and a lot of mental energy. Screenshot 2014-11-16 19.29.46.png

One tool I've developed to help me is this: Guidelines for Designing PD.docx I created this for myself--it's checklisty sort of. But as I was reviewing it, I thought that some of you might also find it helpful. So here it is!

This thing is founded on the principles of adult learning and incorporates knowledge on how our brains learn best. There's lots of research, theory and science behind the suggestions, trust me on that, although I'm not going to explain it all now. Some day...

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Steven Mintz on Competency-Based Education 2.0

Steven Mintz on Competency-Based Education 2.0 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Competency-Based Education can produce unprecedented gains in access, affordability, and student success. The challenge is to do this right.




Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Reading On A Screen Is Bad For Learning. Here's Why

Reading On A Screen Is Bad For Learning. Here's Why | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Historically, thinking and reading have gone hand-in-hand. Eric Havelock argued years back that development of alphabetic writing in Greece enabled a level of analysis not earlier possible. Havelock may have gilded the alpha, beta, gamma, delta lily, but no one who reads Aristotle or Aristophanes doubts these writers gave us a lot to mentally chew on.

Today there's much talk about what goes by the lofty name "critical thinking." The phrase generally means something like "examine other people's arguments" or "evaluate data." In Beyond the University, Michael Roth suggests the notion of critical thinking is our attempt "to describe the benefits of inquiry that doesn't aim at specialization." Pursuit of critical thinking skills permeates education at all levels. Among the eight million or so Google hits for "critical thinking lower school" are Glenelg Country School's focus on "sharpening critical thinking skills in grades 2 through 5" and Fairfax Country Schools' K through 6 curriculum incorporating "critical and creative thinking lessons."

However you dice it, we want young people to delve into materials with a mindset prepared to take a reasoned, objective stand rather than memorizing or shooting opinions from the hip. What kind of materials? Largely written, and these days, there's the rub. We teach the next generation to decipher words on a page, but as the form of what constitutes a page shifts, so does the nature of reading.

You have to be Rip Van Winkle not to be part of the migration from words in print to words onscreen. Digital devices bring the written word to our virtual doorstep: We read on laptops, eReaders, tablets, and mobile phones. We download books in less time than it takes to pull their physical cousins off the shelf. We travel light, and generally save money.

But when reading long, serious text on digital screens, do we think critically? Increasingly, teachers and students alike are judging that cost and convenience are ample grounds for replacing print with pixels. The conversation that has been missing is whether some types of reading (and types of readers) may be poor candidates for the journey.
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50 Apps That Clarify 50 New Ways To Learn ~ TeachThought ~ by Terry Heick

50 Apps That Clarify 50 New Ways To Learn ~ TeachThought ~ by Terry Heick | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Below we’ve gathered a diverse list of learning apps across iOS and Android from giants like Google, Apple, Microsoft, as well as upstarts like Brainfeed, The Sandbox, and Knowji. None of the apps are perfect, but each app does something special, and in that talent represents what’s possible as we careen towards 2020 and beyond.

Learning through play. Self-directed learning. Flipped learning. Mobile learning. Collaborative learning. Social learning. It’s all here. Alone, none offer the turn-key approach to education that textbooks have traditionally turned to, but that’s part of the strength. As education technology grows, we can adapt to new learning models that take advantage of the fragmented but enormous potential of self-directed, creative, collaborative, and almost entirely mobile learning.

Via Jim Lerman
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