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How do I know that all of this was real? The dark side of being a digital stranger in an online learning environment – Part 2 | Peter Bryant

How do I know that all of this was real? The dark side of being a digital stranger in an online learning environment – Part 2 | Peter Bryant | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

I have been actively engaged online for nearly 17 years from bulletin boards, to IRC and now onto any number of social media platforms. It has been a continual cycle of experience and appropriation and evaluation. Most of it has been enjoyable and satisfying. Some of it has been painful, traumatic and cathartic. There have been moments of inspiration, of creativity and of disappointment and body shaking laughter. I have made friends, partners, enemies and colleagues. That lived life informs how I design and develop a programme especially where there is some blended or online component. I am also 42. I am cogniscent of the fact that modes of interactivity are neither uniform nor agreed across all users, and that there are significant differences between age groups, context of usage and device preference. But I am also aware that many of my own experiences would not have happened in real life. It took both the emancipatory and the disinhibiting nature of social media to facilitate much of those experiences. In part 1, I looked at three of John Suler’s considerations for what he termed the ‘online disinhibition effect’, a way of understanding some of the darker aspects of online interaction. In part 2, I would like to explore three more; invisibility, dissociative imagination and minimisation of status and authority.

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Future Thoughts (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Future Thoughts (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
This is a difficult time in higher education. Students, parents, and policymakers are all questioning the cost/benefit of a college degree. They want to see better access, more relevant teaching models, and the support to ensure completion in a reasonable timeframe. New technologies like MOOCs and online distance learning were developed in an effort to revitalize a centuries-old educational model, to provide access and flexibility. Although it's clear that many improvements are needed, some existing educational models remain relevant.

The integration of technologies such as MOOCs, lecture-capture systems, and video telepresence has broadened students' access and choice and made education more "location agnostic." But there's still a major challenge in creating high-quality, engaging, and seamless experiences for online and distance learning students and educators. Most institutions are not there yet, which means that traditional face-to-face learning models in higher education will continue. Digital learning materials such as e-books have worked to reduce costs and provide a more personalized learning experience, yet studies show that millennials prefer reading from print books for both deep reading and enjoyment.1 For this reason, I don't see traditional books going away anytime soon.

Yes, technology's role in education will continue to grow, but so will the significance of face-to-face learning. Teaching is less dependent on one teacher delivering content in broadcast mode to students sitting in rows of chairs while quietly listening and taking notes. Teaching today needs to provide students with the opportunity to acquire skills in critical thinking, problem solving, analysis, and creativity, as well as the soft skills employers require in the workplace: interpersonal, collaborative, and presentation skills. Effectively teaching these higher-level cognitive and soft skills is difficult to do remotely; thus, the need for physical learning spaces will continue to be crucial. With the more active integration of technology, the educator's role will continue to expand outside of content delivery, allowing more time for interacting with and mentoring students.
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

"Studies show that millennials prefer reading from print books for both deep reading and enjoyment"

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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, Today, 11:12 AM

"Estudos mostram que millennials preferem a leitura de livros impressos para ambos profunda leitura e diversão"

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Striving for excellence in tertiary teaching - Volume 1


Via Peter Mellow
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The True Power of MOOCs May Have Been Accidental

The True Power of MOOCs May Have Been Accidental | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Free online college courses haven't sparked the higher-ed revolution advocates envisioned, but perhaps they could reform education in a way that was largely unintentional.

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, July 29, 12:30 PM

MOOCs as PD. Interesting. I was one of the educators who took the "Leaders in Learning" MOOC mentioned in the article! It was a great course. 

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The Beginning of the End of Traditional Higher Education

The Beginning of the End of Traditional Higher Education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Once employers start seeing qualified candidates with alternative educational backgrounds, the ability of the four-year colleges to hold students hostage to increasingly worthless degrees will gradually weaken. Then, the traditional academic institutions can choose to evolve or perish.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Tony Guzman's curator insight, Today, 9:40 AM

In this opinion piece the author shares why they believe that higher education is on "it's last legs". Agree or disagree?

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What If the U.S. Treated Teaching Like It Treats Professional Sports?

What If the U.S. Treated Teaching Like It Treats Professional Sports? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
At the end of the summer, teachers across the country will return to work. They’ll clean off old desks in poorly lit classrooms, filled with supplies paid for with their own paychecks.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Effective Learning Design: The 6 Engagement Factors

Effective Learning Design: The 6 Engagement Factors | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Designing and developing learning that helps drive end-user engagement is always a goal, and at times, a lofty one! Sometimes the content itself is so completely boring that it's hard to design an experience that leads to a truly rewarding activity. However, even with the most dreadful compliance content or regulatory and/or safety content, there are factors you can employ to help you take even the most boring or complicated topics and turn them into more engaging experiences. And remember: huma

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, July 29, 5:01 PM

Some important things to remember whether teaching online or face-to-face. 

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Why your brain acts like a jazz band - Futurity

Why your brain acts like a jazz band - Futurity | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The human brain improvises while its rhythm section keeps up a steady beat. But when it comes to taking on intellectually challenging tasks, groups of neurons tune in to one another for a fraction of a second and harmonize, then go back to improvising, according to new research.

These findings, reported in the journal Nature Neuroscience, could pave the way for more targeted treatments for people with brain disorders marked by fast, slow, or chaotic brain waves, also known as neural oscillations.

Tracking the changing rhythms of the healthy human brain at work advances our understanding of such disorders as Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and even autism, which are characterized in part by offbeat brain rhythms. In jazz lingo, for example, bands of neurons in certain mental illnesses may be malfunctioning because they’re tuning in to blue notes, or playing double time or half time.
“The human brain has 86 billion or so neurons all trying to talk to each other in this incredibly messy, noisy, and electrochemical soup,” says study lead author Bradley Voytek. “Our results help explain the mechanism for how brain networks quickly come together and break apart as needed.”

Via Wildcat2030
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Encoding and Retrieving Memories: Understanding Hippcampal Function at the Cellular Level

Encoding and Retrieving Memories: Understanding Hippcampal Function at the Cellular Level | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Researchers report the successful memory encoding and retrieval occurs in the dorsal area of the rat hippocampus.


Via Emre Erdogan
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Development of global health education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a student-driven initiative

Development of global health education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a student-driven initiative | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Global health is increasingly present in the formal educational curricula of medical schools across North America. In 2008, students at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) perceived a lack of structured global health education in the existing curriculum and began working with the administration to enhance global health learning opportunities, particularly in resource-poor settings. Key events in the development of global health education have included the introduction of a global health intersession mandatory for all first-year students; required pre-departure ethics training for students before all international electives; and the development of a clinical global health elective (Global Health Leadership Program, GHLP). The main challenges to improving global health education for medical students have included securing funding, obtaining institutional support, and developing an interprofessional program that benefits from the resources of the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing. Strategies used included objectively demonstrating the need for and barriers to more structured global health experiences; obtaining guidance and modifying existing resources from other institutions and relevant educational websites; and harnessing institution-specific strengths including the large Johns Hopkins global research footprint and existing interprofessional collaborations across the three schools. The Johns Hopkins experience demonstrates that with a supportive administration, students can play an important and effective role in improving global health educational opportunities. The strategies we used may be informative for other students and educators looking to implement global health programs at their own institutions.
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Using Technology to Improve how the Brain Learns — Emerging Education Technologies

Using Technology to Improve how the Brain Learns — Emerging Education Technologies | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
It is common knowledge that an array of technological advancements have made many medical miracles a reality over the centuries. The ways in which technologies are being applied to solve medical problems is accelerating at an ever-more-rapid pace.

While learning is not “a medical problem”, it is certainly a “brain problem”, and the brain is our most advanced organ. We’ve barely begin to understand how this amazing mass of cells works. Along these lines, I’m fascinated by the possibilities for information or ‘computer’ technologies to be leveraged to help the mind grow and enhance learning, much as other technologies have been used to help other human organs thrive.
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 28, 12:53 PM

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eLearning Development Checklist Infographic

eLearning Development Checklist Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Despite great content and graphics, things can go wrong. The eLearning Development Checklist Infographic lists a few points to consider which may save your time and money when you develop your eLearning courses.
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Do You Speak Millennialish? Using eLearning as a Tool for Professional and Personal Growth

Do You Speak Millennialish? Using eLearning as a Tool for Professional and Personal Growth | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There’s a mindset that’s already in the workplace, thanks to us who are, well, older than the Millennials on our teams. We tend to separate work from play, training from entertainment, and tools from toys. Again, our Millennials are far more likely to integrate these seemingly disparate worlds. One of the reasons why eLearning is so vital to personal and professional growth is the blurring of the lines between work and play. It’s a lesson that all of us can learn. Perhaps one of the safest bits of advice for us non-Millennials is this: we gotta learn to lighten up.

Up until this generation of incoming workers, professional and personal growth was something you mostly pursued on your own. From time to time, you might be offered a chance to develop yourself professionally through work-related courses.
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Shoehorn for Moodle 2.9 released

Shoehorn for Moodle 2.9 released | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Gareth Barnard, maintainer of some of the most popular Moodle plugins, has released his responsive Shoehorn theme for the first time as a stable version for the LMS. Shoehorn is a Bootstrap 3-based theme that carries with it many customizable features and cutting edge framework (LESS, Awesome Font, and more). Features include

* Accordion blocks region
* Course tiles
* Footer blocks
* Bespoke options around the page (login, footer, copyright, etc.)
* Slider navigation of course content when displayed as 1 topic per page (cool!)
* Marketing spots similar to Essential
* Draft / Published state for front page elements
and all sorts of other customizations to just about every part of the theme

Download the theme for 2.9 and 2.8 here: https://moodle.org/plugins/view/theme_shoehorn

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Striving for excellence in tertiary teaching - Volume 2


Via Peter Mellow
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, Today, 11:13 AM

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Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking Want to Save the World From Killer Robots on the Battlefield

Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking Want to Save the World From Killer Robots on the Battlefield | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking are among the leaders from the science and technology worlds calling for a ban on autonomous weapons, warning that weapons with a mind of their own "would not be beneficial for humanity."


Along with 1,000 other signatories, Musk and Hawking signed their names to an open letter that will be presented this week at the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Buenos Aires, Argentina.


Autonomous weapons are defined by the group as artillery that can "search for and eliminate people meeting certain pre-defined criteria, but do not include cruise missiles or remotely piloted drones for which humans make all targeting decisions."


 

Why You Might Not Have to Fear RobotsWhat Elon Musk Says Could Be More Dangerous Than Nuclear WeaponsGoogle Paves the Way to a Robotic Future  

 

"Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology has reached a point where the deployment of such systems is -- practically if not legally -- feasible within years, not decades, and the stakes are high: autonomous weapons have been described as the third revolution in warfare, after gunpowder and nuclear arms," the letter, posted on the Future of Life Institute's website says.


If one country pushes ahead with the creation of robotic killers, the group wrote it fears it will spur a global arms race that could spell disaster for humanity.


"Autonomous weapons are ideal for tasks such as assassinations, destabilizing nations, subduing populations and selectively killing a particular ethnic group," the letter says. "We therefore believe that a military AI arms race would not be beneficial for humanity. There are many ways in which AI can make battlefields safer for humans, especially civilians, without creating new tools for killing people."


While the group warns of the potential carnage killer robots could inflict, they also stress they aren't against certain advances in artificial intelligence.


"We believe that AI has great potential to benefit humanity in many ways, and that the goal of the field should be to do so," the letter says. "Starting a military AI arms race is a bad idea, and should be prevented by a ban on offensive autonomous weapons beyond meaningful human control."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A Teacher’s Guide to Wikipedia

A Teacher’s Guide to Wikipedia | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Many students start their research process on Wikipedia. Not because they’re being defiant, but because the site comes up first in many online searches.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 29, 6:11 PM

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basil60's curator insight, Today, 5:26 PM

Personally, I've never had a problem with Wikipedia. They issue less errata than Brittanica!

Kathie Turner's curator insight, Today, 8:29 PM

Wikipedia is your friend!  No need to ban your students from using it,  just tell them to use other databases and websites as well. 

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Full-View Screen Sharing For Google Hangouts

Full-View Screen Sharing For Google Hangouts | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Hangouts is an amazing way of being able to communicate with anyone from anywhere. The thumbnail photos used to take over the bottom right hand side of the screen when sharing.  Sometimes, this made it hard to view the entire screen.  Like so: Now, when you share content through Screen Sharing during a presentation in Keep Reading ..

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Juergen Wagner
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Mirror-Touch Synesthesia: This Doctor Knows Exactly How You Feel

Mirror-Touch Synesthesia: This Doctor Knows Exactly How You Feel | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Dr. Salinas himself has a rare medical condition, one that stands in marked contrast to his patients’: While Josh appeared unresponsive even to his own sensations, Salinas is peculiarly attuned to the sensations of others. If he sees someone slapped across the cheek, Salinas feels a hint of the slap against his own cheek. A pinch on a stranger’s right arm might become a tickle on his own. “If a person is touched, I feel it, and then I recognize that it’s touch,” Salinas says.

The condition is called mirror-touch synesthesia, and it has aroused significant interest among neuroscientists in recent years because it appears to be an extreme form of a basic human trait. In all of us, mirror neurons in the premotor cortex and other areas of the brain activate when we watch someone else’s behaviors and actions. Our brains map the regions of the body where we see someone else caressed, jabbed, or whacked, and they mimic just a shade of that feeling on the same spots on our own bodies. For mirror-touch synesthetes like Salinas, that mental simulacrum is so strong that it crosses a threshold into near-tactile sensation, sometimes indistinguishable from one’s own. Neuroscientists regard the condition as a state of “heightened empathic ability.”

This might sound like a superpower of sorts, a mystical connection between one person’s subjective experience and another’s. But to be clear, Salinas cannot read minds. He doesn’t know whether Josh felt the impact of the reflex hammer, and the tingling in his kneecap says more about his own extraordinary nervous system than it does about that of his patient. What’s more, for those who experience mirror-touch synesthesia—an estimated 1.6 percent of the general population—the condition is often more debilitating than it is empowering.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Learnification Of Gaming

Learnification Of Gaming | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Gamification of learning is a well known concept; we use artifacts known from games to motivate people to learn. In this article I would like to discuss a contradictory idea: Learnification of gaming. Thinking about it I am wondering how we can better use games for by-the-way learning.
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Growth Mindset

Growth Mindset | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ines Bieler
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Albert Chia's curator insight, July 29, 8:56 PM

A leadership philosophy I'm currently adopting for my school. 

Mike Lewis's curator insight, July 29, 9:25 PM

Through Technology practice - the Force with Grow - this mindset is something that should be encouraged and developed in education, technology and design.

Dawid's curator insight, Today, 7:07 AM
Great way to think of learning approach
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E-learning is not a “silver bullet”

E-learning is not a “silver bullet” | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Traditional teaching should happen in conjunction with technology solutions that benefit the process of learning and teaching rather than trying to replace it, says an expert.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rog Rothe's curator insight, July 29, 1:53 AM

I scooped this because it will be interesting should Obama get his high-speed internet spread into the rest of the areas of the country.  I have been thinking all week about the graphic that Dr. D showed us in relation to internet access and socio-economic indications. 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Edtech and assessment
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Cloud technology: the advantages and disadvantages for universities

Cloud technology: the advantages and disadvantages for universities | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Jeremy Sharp looks at the perks and pitfalls for universities using cloud-based serives

Via Julie Tardy
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 28, 12:50 PM

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Study documents how shifts in unemployment rates lead to shifts in college majors

Study documents how shifts in unemployment rates lead to shifts in college majors | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Conventional wisdom holds that in bad economic times, students are more likely to make academic decisions that favor fields perceived to be paths to jobs, and jobs that pay well. Despite plenty of evidence that liberal arts graduates also have successful careers, undergraduates (and their parents) tend in tough times to encourage majors in business and engineering or other fields that seem to promise employment.

A new paper backs up that conventional wisdom with precise data on how high unemployment rates shift students' majors. While both male and female students shift, they do so in different ways. And they both move away from the liberal arts and education when unemployment goes up.

In total, the paper estimates that every increase of 1 percent in the unemployment rate prompts a 3.2 percentage point reallocation of the major choices of men, and 4.1 percentage points for women. In periods of significant increases in unemployment rates, the consequences could be significant for many students' enrollment patterns.

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Top 10 Cloud myths busted, part 1 - TalentLMS Blog

Top 10 Cloud myths busted, part 1 - TalentLMS Blog | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Cloud computing remains a mystery for many enterprise departments and businesses, and there are plenty of myths built up around deploying and running applications on it.

Let’s wear our myth-busters suits, and clean up those myths once and for all.
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Modifying the Flipped Classroom: The "In-Class" Version

Modifying the Flipped Classroom: The "In-Class" Version | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Jennifer Gonzalez proposes the In-Class Flip, a modified version of the flipped-learning model that incorporates the video lecture element as one of several stations that students visit during their class period.

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, July 27, 4:37 PM

This is more relevant to K-12 learning environments, but the basic ideas can be adapted to higher education. I see good applications in any language class.