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How do I know that all of this was real? : The dark side of being a digital stranger in an online learning environment – Part 1 | Peter Bryant

How do I know that all of this was real? : The dark side of being a digital stranger in an online learning environment – Part 1 | Peter Bryant | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

‘Digital strangers are people we interact with, people we are inspired by, people we understand (even a little) about their views and their position in a specific network, but know very little about. We can still learn from and with them. We can create and share. We can innovate and solve problems. We can increase awareness and affect change. We can engage, entertain and provide comfort or inspiration.’

 

At the heart of the concept of the digital stranger is the belief that online interaction affords both the opportunity to represent ourselves in different and (sometimes) untraceable and hidden ways as well as the ability to express ideas, opinions and emotions that because of the apparent anonymity of the virtual environment, we might be unwilling to do face to face. There is a unique manifestation of the digital stranger in the area of online learning that has significant and far-reaching impacts on the effectiveness of student learning and teaching.

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Quality and Success Factors of MOOCs

The presentation discusses quality considerations and success factors of MOOCs - a critical review of current discussions and some potentials for Asian-Europea… (El éxito de los #moocs http://t.co/Tv4MxInhec)...

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Leveraging Informal Learning Methods

Leveraging Informal Learning Methods | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

By definition, informal learning is an unofficial, unscheduled, and impromptu way that many people learn today. It usually takes the form of reading articles, books, viewing online courses in spare time, or going to a seminar rather than registering into a formal course.

 

Informal learning is growing because it is usually efficient, autonomous, relevant, accessible, and flexible.

 

People love learning. It is easy to open up a web-browser and search for a topic to find out more information. One survey found that nine out of 10 people indicated they enjoyed learning.

 

Interestingly, in this same survey nearly 40% of working professionals haven’t taken a single course of any type since they were in college.

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The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload | KurzweilAI

The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload | KurzweilAI | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

But somehow some people become quite accomplished at managing information flow. In The Organized Mind, Daniel J. Levitin, PhD, uses the latest brain science to demonstrate how those people excel—and how readers can use their methods to regain a sense of mastery over the way they organize their homes, workplaces, and time.

 

With lively, entertaining chapters on everything from the kitchen junk drawer to health care to executive office workflow, Levitin reveals how new research into the cognitive neuroscience of attention and memory can be applied to the challenges of our daily lives. This Is Your Brain on Music showed how to better play and appreciate music through an understanding of how the brain works. The Organized Mind shows how to navigate the churning flood of information in the twenty-first century with the same neuroscientific perspective


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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, August 27, 1:43 PM

I've not read this book yet, but I've ordered it. I enjoyed Levitin's previous book, "This Is Your Brain on Music," and although I am skeptical of what has been called "neurobollocks," I suspect this will be a good addition to my small infotention library.

JoseAlvarezCornett's comment, August 28, 9:07 AM
Howard, besides your own book and this one, can you list five must read books about infotention?
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The Real Legacy of MOOCs: Better Introductory Courses

The Real Legacy of MOOCs: Better Introductory Courses | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Rather than a narrative that puts the MOOC phenomenon within a “bound-to-crash and there will be tears” frame, I believe we will eventually be telling a much happier story about the impact of MOOC hype. This will not be a story about open online learning replacing traditional bricks-and-mortar institutions or of one superstar professor replacing the teaching of thousands of others. Instead, the real impact of MOOCs will be felt far away from the open online edX or Coursera courses. The real impact of MOOCs will be found in the traditional introductory course.


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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How Much Time Do Students Worldwide Spend In Classrooms? - Edudemic

How Much Time Do Students Worldwide Spend In Classrooms? - Edudemic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

When we compare education systems around the world (which we do, quite often) to see what’s working and what isn’t, one of the metrics we often see is ‘school life expectancy’, otherwise known as how many years students go to school. In the US, we most often assume that students go to school for at least 13 years (K-12), plus “some” college or post high school education. When we talk about schools in developing countries, we hear about children who can’t go to school past a young age (sometimes around 8 years old) because they need to make money for their family’s survival, because they don’t have the opportunity to do so, because of their gender, or because it would be dangerous or prohibitively expensive to do so.

A new report from Cornell University, INSEAD and the World Intellectual Property Organization takes a look at school life expectancy around the globe. The results are pretty interesting, though this particular graph brings up a number of questions including a fairly substantial one: Does a greater number of years in school mean more learning, or students who are better prepared for careers? Obviously quantity doesn’t necessarily mean quality, do we also see things like higher test scores in areas where school life expectancy is very high? What other big questions would you ask? Weigh in by leaving a comment below, mentioning @Edudemic on Twitter or leaving your thoughts on our Facebook page.
Global School Life Expectancy

Where are children going to school the longest? The graphic below looks at primary to tertiary education life expectancy around the globe.

* There are 8 countries where students spend an average of 17-20 years in school: Australia, New Zealand, Iceland, Ireland, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, and Finland
* There are 5 countries where students spend an average of 0-5 years in school: Senegal, Pakistan, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, and Niger
* The vast majority of countries for which data was available show that students spend between 10-15 years in school on average

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Learnlets » Rethinking Design: Pedagogy

Learnlets » Rethinking Design: Pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

In thinking through how to design courses that lead to both engaging experiences and meaningful outcomes, I’ve been working on the component activities.  As part of that, I’ve been looking at elements such as pedagogy in pre-, in-, and post-class sessions so that there are principled reasons behind the design.

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How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

In his new book, “How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens,” author Benedict Carey informs us that “most of our instincts about learning are misplaced, incomplete, or flat wrong” and “rooted more in superstition than in science.”

That’s a disconcerting message, and hard to believe at first. But it’s also unexpectedly liberating, because Carey further explains that many things we think of as detractors from learning — like forgetting, distractions, interruptions or sleeping rather than hitting the books — aren’t necessarily bad after all. They can actually work in your favor, according to a body of research that offers surprising insights and simple, doable strategies for learning more effectively.

Society has ingrained in us “a monkish conception of what learning is, of you sitting with your books in your cell,” Carey told MindShift. It’s a ritual of self-discipline, isolation and blocks of repetitive practice, whether in math, vocabulary, piano or tennis. But that traditional ideal has psychological downsides. Often, “you feel like you haven’t done it right or you haven’t done enough of it,” he said. “It causes a lot of anxiety because of what we think we should be doing.” For many students, learning has become a high-stress burden.


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 25, 10:41 PM

How do we learn? This post explores this issue and provides some suggstions on some best practices for studying. 

The author of the post provides three "take-aways" from the book.

* "Forgetting isn't always bad."

* "The brain is a foraging learner."

* "We can be tactical in our learning."

A number of suggestions on best ways to study are also included.

* Rather than cramming study material for a shorter period of time everyday. You will retain more.

* Studying in different locations may be beneficial.

* Taking breaks after intense studying is good. It provides a break for your brain. This is called diffuse learning.

* Rather than rereading material quiz yourself on it to see how much you recall.

Additional suggestions are included in the post and there is more information. 

If this is an area of interest to you Coursera will be running another session of Learning How to Learn, beginning in early October. The course is free unless you want to receive a Certificate. I can vouch for this course as I am currently enrolled and at some point in the near future I will share more information about it. To learn more about the course go to Learning How to Learn

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Who's Framed Personalized Learning?

Who's Framed Personalized Learning? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Why personalized learning is all about the learner, starting with the learner. It's time to frame it around the stories where learners are owning and driving their learning.

Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, August 25, 10:49 AM
Many teachers that partner with their learners and change how they teach told us they would never go back to traditional teaching. So we decided to ask a few of our friends what they think about framing personalized learning

"Personalized learning primarily involves changing the role of a child from a passive-oriented student to an active-oriented learner. Any process, practice, system or initiative which labels itself 'personalized,' but does not change the role of the learner to have more voice and choice in their own learning isn't fully personalized.  Much of what is being categorized as personalized learning today involves technology integration and enhancements in the role of the teacher, without necessarily empowering the learner to discover, follow and cultivate their own passions and take an ever-increasing role for the privilege and responsibility of learning."  - See more at: http://www.personalizelearning.com/2014/08/whos-framed-personalized-learning.html#sthash.MkbRFiBY.dpuf
- Bryan Bronn, Branson Junior High, Branson. MO
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Beyond Knowing Facts, How Do We Get to a Deeper Level of Learning?

Beyond Knowing Facts, How Do We Get to a Deeper Level of Learning? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

So what defines deeper learning? This group has identified six competencies: mastering content, critical thinking, effective written and oral communication, collaboration, learning how to learn, and developing academic mindsets.

 


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 25, 9:55 AM

Some good points here. Not so sure about the academic mindset though.


Training in Business's curator insight, August 27, 5:04 AM

Beyond Knowing Facts, How Do We Get to a Deeper Level of Learning?

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Fortnightly Mailing: New research on how MOOC video production affects student engagement

Just at the point where we are "going firm" on video production for the first phase of the Ufi Charitable Trust funded Citizen Maths course, I come across this 10 page research report [PDF] which substantially develops some earlier findings, and which reinforces nearly all my mainly experience-based knowledge of what kinds of instructional video are most effective. (The report is oddly silent on whether there is a relationship between audio quality and learner engagement, which has always struck me as being also of crucial importance.)

The list of seven main findings:

1. Shorter videos are much more engaging - engagement drops sharply after 6 minutes
2. Videos that intersperse an instructor’s talking head with PowerPoint slides are more engaging than showing only slides
3. Videos produced with a more personal feel could be more engaging than high-fidelity studio recordings
4. Khan-style tablet drawing tutorials are more engaging than PowerPoint slides or code screencasts
5. Even high-quality prerecorded classroom lectures are not as engaging when chopped up into short segments for a MOOC
6. Videos where instructors speak fairly fast and with high enthusiasm are more engaging
7. Students engage differently with lecture and tutorial videos

 

 

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ViewPure / videos without clutter

ViewPure / videos without clutter | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Watch YouTube videos without comments, ads, related videos, or any other distractions. It's great for teachers, parents, and organizations alike - or really, anybody.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Inma Contreras's curator insight, August 24, 7:38 AM

Great risource!

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 24, 1:41 PM

I'm tired of waiting for ads when showing a video in class. How about you?

Filipe Cálix's curator insight, August 26, 2:32 PM

Muito interessante este site. De certa forma, "limpa, purifica" um vídeo retirando-lhe ads, comentários e tudo aquilo que não faz parte do vídeo original.

Basta copiar o link do vídeo, entrar no ViewPure e colar na barra de endereços. Quase de imediato, pode assistir ao vídeo limpo.

O ViewPure também disponibiliza todos os vídeos que foram "purificados" no site.

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Use Stories in eLearning: 6 Tips to Bring Out Your Inner Storyteller

Use Stories in eLearning: 6 Tips to Bring Out Your Inner Storyteller | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"Stories have captivated us as a species since the dawn of man. Through stories, we have passed on traditions, remembered the past, and carried information across the millennia. 

And it's not just our ancestors who harnessed the power of stories, either. Stories still work to reach people, which is why we see businesses turning to the power of storytelling in branding efforts, marketing campaigns, corporate strategies, and even eLearning courses and business presentations."


Via Beth Dichter
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Gary Harwell's curator insight, August 23, 12:52 PM

Everybody likes a good story.

niftyjock's curator insight, August 24, 6:16 PM

Once upon a time... Narratives are a great way to get information across. 

Jo Blannin - Innovative Learning's curator insight, August 25, 8:00 PM

Do you work with older students? Then you will enjoy this article about storytelling in learning. Great for introducing studnets to the need to structure online presentations as well as traditional, writing tasks.


Reading a good online presentation (from TED maybe) and then asking students to map the presentation to the story outline in this article will reinforce this learning for them.


Let me know if you give this a go - I've done similar activities with videos and story structures in primary schools and the students loved investigating the hidden structure!

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Is Technology Ruining Our Ability to Read Emotions? Study Says Yes

Is Technology Ruining Our Ability to Read Emotions? Study Says Yes | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"We’ve all heard it before, “Kids don’t know grammar anymore because all they do is text,” or “Today’s generation misses everything going on around them because they’re staring at their phones.” But a recent research study by UCLA warns the damage of too much screen time may be even worse than many of us imagined."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 28, 10:23 PM

How often have you seen students sitting at a table together, but communicating via their cell phones. The eyes are on the screens, not their friends and classmates. 

This post shares that technology is impactint students ability to read emotions. The next question to ask might be c"Can this change?"

The answer appears to be yes. For more information click through to the post.

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Controlling extreme events on complex networks

Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network “mobile” can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed.

 

Controlling extreme events on complex networks
• Yu-Zhong Chen, Zi-Gang Huang & Ying-Cheng Lai

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 6121 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep06121


Via Claudia Mihai, Complexity Digest, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Infographie : "30 Facts About Gamification in eLearning"

Infographie : "30 Facts About Gamification in eLearning" | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Gamification in eLearning Infographic: 30 Facts About Gamification in eLearning Infographic by TalentLMS the gamified LMS!

Via uTOP Inria, Laurent Picard, Gisele Brugger
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uTOP Inria's curator insight, August 27, 2:24 AM

(elearning infographics, 30/07/2014)

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Toward a Luddite Pedagogy

Toward a Luddite Pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The time has come to take a stand against this thoughtless use of “Luddite” in the pejorative. The historical record needs to be set straight, and it needs to be set straight as a prelude to defending a Luddite approach to education.

 

A Luddite pedagogy for the 21st century

Just as the 19th century Luddism was interested far more in a forward-looking political agenda than in particular pieces of technology, so a 21st century Luddism in  education will be concerned with more important issues than whether or not allowing pupils to use their own devices in class is a good idea. Like their political ancestors, the Luddite pedagogues will wield a hammer, but they won’t see any urgency in bringing it down on trivial things like touch-screen gadgetry. Instead, the targets lie elsewhere.

 

One place they lie is in the false talk of liberation that has gained popularity among people using the #edtech hashtag. A Luddite pedagogy is a pedagogy of liberation, and, as such, it clashes head on with the talk of liberation peddled by advocates of edtech. According to the latter, the child, previously condemned to all the unbearably oppressive restrictions of having to learn in groups, can now be liberated by the tech that makes a 1:1 model of education feasible, launching each and every child on an utterly personal learning journey. Liberation as personalisation – here the Luddite finds something that ought to be smashed.

 

But what needs to be smashed is less the pedagogy itself than the idea of freedom it rests on – the more general political notion that freedom is all about freeing individuals from social constraints so that they can pursue their personal projects unhampered by the claims of society. This is the essentially liberal idea championed by Sir Ken Robinson, for instance, for whom it is enough for individuals to find things to do that they enjoy and that allow them to develop a talent.

 

But we need to be clear here: Luddism doesn’t want to smash the concern for personal freedom, rather it wants to smash the idea that it is enough. The untruth of personalisation is its unjustified narrowing of the horizon of liberation.


Via Hybrid Pedagogy
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, August 27, 5:27 PM

"Luddites" have been seen as against progress.  This article argues that they claimed there are more important ways to progress than just new electronic gadgets and scientific advances. -Lon 

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Moocs are free – but for how much longer?

Moocs are free – but for how much longer? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Monetising career development courses could be the next step for the university, says Stanford professor

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know

Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
TEST Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know
by Terry Heick
The above image comes from a presentation from Jesse Stommel , an Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Via Charles Fischer
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Charles Fischer's curator insight, August 26, 8:49 AM

A great article with a wonderful title! I wish I had come up with that definition for teaching. My favorite part was the separation of knowledge, wisdom and understanding. How often do we contemplate the differences between those three words? 

21st Century Learning Coach 's curator insight, August 27, 8:52 PM
From www.teachthought.com - August 26, 5:49 AM
TEST Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know 
by Terry Heick 
 The above image comes from a presentation from Jesse Stommel , an Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at University of Wisconsin-Madison.
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Special edition on research on MOOCs in the journal ‘Distance Education’

Special edition on research on MOOCs in the journal ‘Distance Education’ | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The August 2014 edition of the Australian-based journal, Distance Education (Vol.35, No. 2.), is devoted to new research on MOOCs. There is a guest editor, Kemi Jona, from Northwestern University, Illinois, as well as the regular editor, Som Naidu.

 

The six articles in this edition are fascinating, both in terms of their content, but even more so in their diversity. There are also three commentaries, by Jon Baggaley, Gerhard Fischer and myself.

 

My commentary provides my personal analysis of the six articles.


Via Peter Mellow
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Quiz Yourself: How Good Are You at Teaching the Art of Learning?

Quiz Yourself: How Good Are You at Teaching the Art of Learning? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Test how well you know some of these counterintuitive study tips.

Via Dr Peter Carey, Ivon Prefontaine, Lynnette Van Dyke, iPamba
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 25, 8:00 PM

The art of learning is the flip side of the coin with the art of teaching on it.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Free Screen Recorder Video Capture Software.

Free Screen Recorder Video Capture Software. | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Screen recorder is convenient and safe software that allows to take PC screen video capture of high quality, with or without sound. The program has no viruses, spyware and unwanted applications. Screen Recorder has been tested by the advanced antivirus systems that proved it is absolutely secure software in its segment.

 


Via Nik Peachey
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Progressive training's curator insight, August 27, 5:12 AM

Free Screen Recorder Video Capture Software

Tim Brook's curator insight, August 28, 8:24 AM

Swapped Camstudio (loads of adware and capture issues) for this. So far so good.

Snapshotic's curator insight, August 28, 1:39 PM

I downloaded this and AVG found Malware embedded, beware...

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Excellent Google Drive Resources for Teachers

Excellent Google Drive Resources for Teachers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

On the occasion of the first back-to-school week, I compiled this list of excellent resources to help teachers make the best of Google Drive in their classrooms. I firmly believe that Google Drive is one of the elemental web tools with huge educational potential that every teacher should be able to tap into. However, the thing with so many of Google's services is that their power and usefulness lies in their hidden features. The resources below cover some of these features.

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Is content still important in a digital age?

Is content still important in a digital age? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Managing content

For most teachers and instructors, content remains a key focus. Content includes facts, ideas, principles, evidence, and descriptions of processes or procedures. A great deal of time is spent on discussing what content should be included in the curriculum, what needs to be covered in a course or a program, what content sources such as text-books students should access, and so on.

Teachers and instructors often feel pressured to cover the whole curriculum in the time available. In particular, lecturing or face-to-face classes remain a prime means for organizing and delivering content. I have already made a case for balancing content with skills development, but issues around content remain critically important in teachi

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Putting Students at the Center: A Reference Guide

Putting Students at the Center: A Reference Guide | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, August 23, 1:54 PM

This reference guide from the Nellie Mae Education Foundation delves deep into the principles of student-centered learning, and explains how they can be implemented to ensure that all students are prepared to succeed in college and beyond.

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Is Education as We Know it On its Way Out?

Is Education as We Know it On its Way Out? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Unless you're an educator, you probably haven't heard predictions by thought leaders that the traditional school system is on its way out. More surprisingly, these predictions are being borne out by experiments where new learning models are being tri...

 

A MUST READ!!!

 


Via Gust MEES
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Ferdi McDermott's curator insight, August 23, 2:59 PM

Not at www.chavagnes.org ...

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 23, 5:01 PM

Perhaps School as we know is on the way out, but education and School are not interchangeable words although they are used that way frequently. Actually, School as we know it should have been on the way out a long time ago. With the current reformers who propose change that does not change the structure, it is not happening soon.

 

@ivon_ehd1

InkySprat's curator insight, August 27, 10:05 AM

Teachers are not immune to the need to learn new skills as the world changes