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Learning 3.0 and the Smart eXtended Web

This slide show accompanied a keynote presentation given for the ICL conference in Villach, Austria on 28 September, 2012.

Via Anne Whaits
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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Moodle and Web 2.0
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Trends | How Technology is Changing the Classroom

Trends | How Technology is Changing the Classroom | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Visit the post for more.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Luísa Lima, Juergen Wagner
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Mónica Beloso's curator insight, April 25, 4:30 AM

añada su visión ...

SMARTERTEACHER's curator insight, April 25, 2:32 PM

Amazing Infographic on Technology and the transformative effect on Education.

David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 25, 4:11 PM

My pick for Infographic of the Week. 

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Want to Create Winning E-learning Courses? 6 Tips

Want to Create Winning E-learning Courses? 6 Tips | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One of the most challenging tasks of an instructional designer to engage the learner in the self- paced learning environment. Unlike a classroom training session, where an instructor engages the trainee, an eLearning course is devoid of human interaction.

So, how can you engage your people in an online learning environment? Well, you need to come up with a highly effective instructional design strategy to hook your learners to the screen.
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Instructional Design and the Search for the Golden Child

Instructional Design and the Search for the Golden Child | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Most instructors seem to be convinced that there is a “golden child” technology out there just waiting to be discovered. If they can just find this technology, or combination of technologies, or even hidden features in technologies they already use… then their classes will magically transform into glorious utopias of engaged learners. Students will be happy, completion rates will skyrocket, everyone will hold hands, pass out flowers, and start a drum circle chanting the praises of how awesome the course is.

What most instructional designers know is the harsh reality that learning more and more about technology and tools often makes it harder to design a good course. Instead of a concentrated focus on what works best for what you want students to learn, technology becomes the driving focus. And this means the course often gets worse, or at best trades one okay-ish design for another okay-ish design.

Some of the most innovative and effective courses out there are being taught with things like blogs and Twitter and YouTube videos – basically just a bunch of tools that most people know how to use already. No golden child magical technology tool doing cool stuff that no one else seems to be aware of. Just really good theory and focused instructional design.

This blog post is one of many that I am working on inspired by the OLC Emerging Technologies Symposium this week, and the conversations that occurred around/at/because of that event. I was in the test kitchen there playing with cool new tools and apps as much as the next person. I love emerging technology and finding new websites and tools and services to use. I also love it when people find great educational uses for these cool new things. But most of the really awesome courses out there are not coming from people getting more technical training, but from people that dig into the theory side and said “I want to accomplish this theoretical idea” and then found the basic technology to realize their vision.
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Processes, outcomes and measuring what we value.

Processes, outcomes and measuring what we value. | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
I produced this diagram as part of a paper ‘Measuring Success and Securing Accountability’ for my governors and SLT.  One reason for writing it is that, along with everyone else, we face a very turbulent period in our examination system.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Mozilla Webmaker Web Literacy Resources

Mozilla Webmaker Web Literacy Resources | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We're a global community dedicated to teaching digital skills and web literacy. We explore, tinker and create together to build a web that's open and made by everyone.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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7 Brainy Ways to Boost Knowledge Retention in eLearning

7 Brainy Ways to Boost Knowledge Retention in eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We remember the scenes and dialogs from some movies long after we have seen them. Some songs continue to haunt us even though we have not listened to them for ages. We can still recite rhymes and poems we learned when we were toddlers. Do you wonder why? Or if you are an instructional designer, have you wondered how you can create such sticky courses? How can you create courses that learners will remember easily and recall effortlessly long after they are back at their workplaces? It is challenging because forgetting is natural.

Scientists carried out a test on some subjects who had to study textbooks, retain, and recall the information. The results were startling: after a day, the subjects remembered 54 percent of what they had learned and after 21 days, they remembered a paltry 18 percent.

But are you surprised? When we were in school, most of us didn't remember what we learned in the earlier grade.

As instructional designers, you have to create courses that are easy to remember and difficult to forget.
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Assessing teachers’ digital competencies

Most every school jurisdiction I know of has come to realize that teachers need (and many lack) the skills to use the net effectively to beneath both themselves as learners and their competence as effective teachers. The problem is that many teachers (and their administrative supervisors) don’t’ know what they don’t know!

To solve this problem, Hans and his Estonian colleagues scoured the net for organizations that have attempted to list basic competencies required for effective use of digital technologies. They soon realized most competency lists focused on general and uncontextualized skills, with little direct relevance to the particular contexts faced by practicing teachers. Finally, they selected the competency model developed in 2008 by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). The model consists of five core competencies:

1. Facilitate and inspire student learning and creativity
2. Design and develop digital-age learning experiences and assessments
3. Model digital age work and learning
4. Promote and model digital-age citizenship and responsibility
5. Engaging in professional growth and leadership

For each of these 5 broad categories, they identified 5 particular competencies in increasing order of complexity. The particular competencies focused on “knowing how” to do some task, as opposed to “knowing what”. The challenging part, of course, comes when trying to identify these particular contexts in a broad enough context to be relevant to all (or nearly all) teachers, yet narrow enough to be contextually relevant. The lower level competencies were assessed using multiple choice or fill in the blanks test items (created to IMS QTI standard, of course). The higher level tasks required teachers to provide written statements, or more often links to web pages that give evidence of their competency. The Digima system then assigns these higher level items to peers for comment and assessment. At the completion of the assessment, a digital competency profile is created that gives evidence of their competencies (for self and/or administrative assessment) that can be embedded in the teachers’ own blogs or profiles, or school websites and provides direction for needed professional development.

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MOOCs and Credentialing: A Revolutionary Perspective | EdCircuit

MOOCs and Credentialing: A Revolutionary Perspective | EdCircuit | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
During the American Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress issued paper money known as Continental Currency. The notes were backed by the “anticipation” of tax revenues. However, without solid backing and since they were easy to counterfeit, the notes quickly became devalued, giving rise to the phrase “not worth a Continental.”

A number of parallels exist between the new frontier of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and their recognition as “academic currency” and the fate of the doomed Continental. Just as the revolutionary banknotes lacked credibility, the assessment instruments used by students to prove knowledge and mastery of MOOCs continue to face an uphill battle for authenticity. Until these issues are overcome, online education will be, in the eyes of many, “not be worth a Continental”.

Efforts are underway to achieve wider recognition and acceptance of alternative forms of credentialing. They are taking place in universities, community colleges and coding “boot-camps.” They generally fall into a framework known as “Competency Based Education” (CBE), representing the first significant step in the unbundling of American higher education. This trend could be compared to the introduction of iTunes, which offered consumers the option to purchase a single track instead of the entire album. Reinventing a credentialing system that has remain largely unchanged for a century is not going to happen in a semester, but cracks are beginning to appear in the ivory tower’s foundation.

One of these initiatives has recently been undertaken by the American Council on Education (ACE) the umbrella organization for higher education. It’s a pilot project in which 25 colleges joined “an alternative credit consortium” to create a more flexible pathway toward a college degree. Participants have agreed to accept transfer credits from students who complete low-cost general-education online courses, potentially benefiting more than 35 million adults who lack a degree.
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Amazing Science
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Technology Trends - Singularity Blog: Most Anticipated New Technologies for 2015/2016

Technology Trends - Singularity Blog: Most Anticipated New Technologies for 2015/2016 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Future timeline, a timeline of humanity's future, based on current trends, long-term environmental changes, advances in technology such as Moore's Law, the latest medical advances, and the evolving geopolitical landscape.

 

10TB solid state drives may soon be possibleConsumer virtual reality will grow exponentially 200GB microSD card announced by SanDisk"The Vive" – new VR headset being developed by HTC and ValveTesco becomes first UK retailer to launch a Google Glass-enabled serviceLaying the foundations for 5G mobileClothes that can monitor and transmit biomedical info3-D haptic shapes can be seen and felt in mid-airAI software can identify objects in photos and videos at near-human levelsDARPA circuit achieves speed of 1 terahertz (THz)3D printer which is 10 times faster than current modelsCreating DNA-based electrical circuitsWi-Fi up to five times faster coming in 2015Long-distance virtual telepathy is demonstratedThe Internet of Things: A Trillion Dollar MarketBrain-like supercomputer the size of a postage stampProject Adam: a new deep-learning system
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa's curator insight, April 24, 4:50 PM

Nuevas tecnologias

AugusII's curator insight, April 25, 6:15 PM

Being up to date a must -  Learning on trends useful.

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Ken Robinson: Government "Standardization" Blocks Innovative Education Reform

Ken Robinson: Government "Standardization" Blocks Innovative Education Reform | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

“I never blame teachers or schools… But there is this deadly culture of standardizing, that’s being pushed on them, politically. My core message here is that we have to personalize education, not standardize it. That all children are different, and we have to find their talents and cultivate them.” ~Ken Robinson

 

 

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Christian Jarrett: Myths and facts about the brain and learning - LT15 Conference - YouTube

The brain and the mind are hot topics right now. Unfortunately real psychology and neuroscience are frequently obscured by hype, myth and misunderstanding.


Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, April 23, 8:31 PM

A review of the facts and myths about the brain and learning by Christian Jarrett, compiler of the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest blog.

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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How emotionally intelligent are you?

Unlike IQ, no one can summarize your EQ in a single number. Read more on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-emotionally-intelligent-you-daniel-goleman

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Didactics and Technology in Education
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Meet Vivaldi: The Power User’s New Favorite Browser

Meet Vivaldi: The Power User’s New Favorite Browser | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Do we really need a new web browser? I'm serious. Never have we had quite so much consumer choice as we do now. It's nothing like the bad old days of the late 1990s, where the only choice was between Internet Explorer and Netscape, which at that point was circling the drain. Now, we have…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , massimo facchinetti, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Smartphones making children borderline autistic, warns expert

Smartphones making children borderline autistic, warns expert | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Children struggle to read emotions and are less empathetic than a generation ago because they spend too much time using tablets and smartphones, a leading psychiatrist has warned.

Iain McGilchrist said children as young as five were less able to read facial expressions because of too much interaction with technology.

He added that he had evidence that more pupils were displaying borderline "autistic" behaviour. Dr McGilchrist, a former Oxford literary scholar who retrained in medicine, said he had heard of increasing numbers of teachers who had to explain to their pupils how to make sense of human faces.

However, experts have said children’s lack of ability to read emotions may be down to cultural or language barriers and not just technology.

Mr McGilchrist said he’d heard from teachers who said they now have to explain to their pupils how to make sense of the human face more than a few years ago.

Dr McGilchrist said he has been contacted by teachers of five to seven year olds who have estimated that roughly a third of their pupils find it difficult to keep attention, read faces.

In an interview with the Telegraph, he said: “These teachers have been teaching for 30 years and had found only a couple of people not able to do these simple tasks. People are increasingly finding it difficult to communicate at an emotional level in what appears to be features of autism.”
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6 Tips To Engage Passive Learners In eLearning

6 Tips To Engage Passive Learners In eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

When it comes right down to it, there are two distinct types of learners. On the one hand, there are those learners who seize every opportunity to soak up knowledge and use this knowledge to improve their lives in some way. They actively attend every eLearning event, online presentation and assessment, because they are well aware of the fact that, by this way, they can expand their professional or personal skills.

 

On the other hand, there are passive learners. Although these individuals acquire the information, they don’t eager to apply it in the world outside the virtual classroom. They might pass every assessment with flying colors and complete every eLearning activity, but they aren’t planning on changing behaviors or using their newly found knowledge to improve any aspect of their lives.

 

So, is it possible to design eLearning deliverables that engage passive learners in eLearning and help them to achieve all of the benefits that the eLearning experience can offer? Of course it is. Here are some tips to follow.

 

 


Via Yashy Tohsaku
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The Invented History of 'The Factory Model of Education'

The Invented History of 'The Factory Model of Education' | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One of the most common ways to criticize our current system of education is to suggest that it’s based on a “factory model.” An alternative condemnation: “industrial era.” The implication is the same: schools are woefully outmoded.

As edX CEO Anant Agarwal puts it, “It is pathetic that the education system has not changed in hundreds of years.” The Clayton Christensen Institute’s Michael Horn and Meg Evan argue something similar: “a factory model for schools no longer works.” “How to Break Free of Our 19th-Century Factory-Model Education System,” advises Joel Rose, the co-founder of the New Classrooms Innovation Partners. Education Next’s Joanne Jacobs points us “Beyond the Factory Model.” “The single best idea for reforming K–12 education,” writes Forbes contributor Steve Denning, ending the “factory model of management.” “There’s Nothing Especially Educational About Factory-Style Management,” according to the American Enterprise Institute’s Rick Hess.

I’d like to add: there’s nothing especially historical about these diagnoses either.
Blame the Prussians

The “factory model of education” is invoked as shorthand for the flaws in today’s schools – flaws that can be addressed by new technologies or by new policies, depending on who’s telling the story. The “factory model” is also shorthand for the history of public education itself – the development of and change in the school system (or – purportedly – the lack thereof).
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 25, 10:56 PM

I wasn't convinced in this criticism of the label "factory system of education."  He added a lot of detail, but seemed to debunk incidentals more than the heart of what is meant by "factory system of education."  -Lon

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Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: Can You Tell The Difference? - eLearning Industry

Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: Can You Tell The Difference? - eLearning Industry | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: How To Integrate Them Into Your eLearning Course Design

Both gamification and game-based eLearning can offer your eLearning course a variety of benefits. However, it’s important to know the distinction between gamification vs game-based eLearning, so that you can choose the approach that better serves your eLearning objectives and goals, but also meets the needs of your learners. Let’s take a closer look at the basics of both gamification and game-based eLearning, in order to determine which methodology is more appropriate for your next eLearning course.

By definition, gamification involves the use of game design elements and mechanics in activities that are not inherently game-based. This is done to motivate and engage the learners, so that they can become active participants in their own learning process. In essence, the eLearning experience itself, is transformed into an educational game by using achievement badges, leaderboards, point systems, level progressions, and quests. These game elements are all integrated to help the learner achieve their learning goals and objectives.

On the other hand, while gamification utilizes game mechanics to transform the eLearning experience into a game, game-based eLearning integrates online games into the learning process to teach a specific skill or achieve a learning objective. Games are essentially used as eLearning activities to give learners the opportunity to acquire new knowledge or skills sets in a fun and engaging way. All eLearning games typically have rules and specific objectives and learners run the risk of “losing” when they participate. Another important distinction between gamification and game-based eLearning is that in a game-based eLearning strategy the content is designed to fit into the confines of the game.
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Cognitive lives scientific

Cognitive lives scientific | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The BBC Radio 4 series The Life Scientific has recently profiled three, count’em, three, cognitive scientists.

Because the BBC find the internet confusing I’m just going to link straight to the mp3s to save you scrabbling about on their site.

The most recent profile you can grab as an mp3 was artificial intelligence and open data Nigel Shadbolt.

The next mp3 for your list is an interview with cognitive neuroscientist and teenage brain researcher Sarah-Jayne Blakemore.

And finally, grab the mp3 of the programme on spatial memory researcher and recent Nobel prize winner John O’Keefe.

That’s an hour an a half of pure cognitive science. Use carefully. Keep away from fire. Remember, the value of your investments may go down as well as up
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Levels of Interactivity (and Why You’re Overcomplicating Things)

Levels of Interactivity (and Why You’re Overcomplicating Things) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
veryone knows that interactivity and engagement can make or break an eLearning program, but if you run a simple Web search on how to best approach interactivity, you’re going to hear a lot of noise. One firm will compare interactivity with the Olympic rings, while another makes a pie graph. Call it the elephant in the room: Every instructional designer is essentially coming up with a new slant on Bloom’s taxonomy.

But pretty pictures and clever metaphors can muddy the waters on something that should be simple to understand: Interactivity is on a spectrum. By understanding when to use different levels of interactivity, you can ditch all the noise and metaphors for a clearer picture of how to truly engage learners.
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LMS vs PLE

I outline the major differences between an LMS and a PLE in this 9 minute video.
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New insight into how brain makes memories

New insight into how brain makes memories | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a neighboring neuron. A team of biologists at Vanderbilt University, headed by Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Donna Webb, studies how these connections are formed at the molecular and cellular level.


The filaments that make these new connections are called dendritic spines and, in a series of experiments described in the April 17 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the researchers report that a specific signaling protein, Asef2, a member of a family of proteins that regulate cell migration and adhesion, plays a critical role in spine formation. This is significant because Asef2 has been linked to autism and the co-occurrence of alcohol dependency and depression.


"Alterations in dendritic spines are associated with many neurological and developmental disorders, such as autism, Alzheimer's disease and Down Syndrome," said Webb. "However, the formation and maintenance of spines is a very complex process that we are just beginning to understand."


Neuron cell bodies produce two kinds of long fibers that weave through the brain: dendrites and axons. Axons transmit electrochemical signals from the cell body of one neuron to the dendrites of another neuron. Dendrites receive the incoming signals and carry them to the cell body. This is the way that neurons communicate with each other.


As they wait for incoming signals, dendrites continually produce tiny flexible filaments called filopodia. These poke out from the surface of the dendrite and wave about in the region between the cells searching for axons. At the same time, biologists think that the axons secrete chemicals of an unknown nature that attract the filopodia. When one of the dendritic filaments makes contact with one of the axons, it begins to adhere and to develop into a spine. The axon and spine form the two halves of a synaptic junction. New connections like this form the basis for memory formation and storage.


The formation of spines is driven by actin, a protein that produces microfilaments and is part of the cytoskeleton. Webb and her colleagues showed that Asef2 promotes spine and synapse formation by activating another protein called Rac, which is known to regulate actin activity. They also discovered that yet another protein, spinophilin, recruits Asef2 and guides it to specific spines. "Once we figure out the mechanisms involved, then we may be able to find drugs that can restore spine formation in people who have lost it, which could give them back their ability to remember," said Webb.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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5 Incredible Free Audio Editing Tools for E-learning Developers

5 Incredible Free Audio Editing Tools for E-learning Developers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Audio plays a key role in enhancing the effectiveness of eLearning courses. It reduces the cognitive load on the learner and ensures better learning. But, how can you make sure that the audio you use in your eLearning course is first-rate? Well, efficient editing goes a long way in producing excellent audio.

There are a number of tools available in the market that can be used to edit audio. These audio editors have lot of features that can be used to apply different types of audio effects to our online courses. We can convert the audio file into different formats based on our requirements. Let us now look at a few popular audio editing tools.
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Welcome to Gamification.org - Gamification Wiki

Welcome to Gamification.org - Gamification Wiki | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

 

Gamification.org is the leading resource and community for gamification information, research and examples in over 18 languages.

 

Since creation of the Gamification Wiki in November 2010, Gamification has surged in popularity and has quickly become one of the most talked about trends. Gamification.org was created to be the ultimate resource for the emerging Gamification Industry, creating a collaborative space for those interested to come together as a community and learn and explore what works and what doesn't and to collectively benefit from the knowledge and wisdom of the community.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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5 Myths About Kids and Computers

5 Myths About Kids and Computers | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When speaking to teachers and parents about teaching computer skills to their kids, there are a few things that adults tend to assume about how kids use computers. Many of these things are simply not true, at least in my experience of teaching digital storytelling, animation, and web design to middle and high schoolers. I think an English class that uses, for example, toondoo.com to create comic strip versions of stories that kids might be reading or writing in class, will go a lot smoother if the teacher is aware of what to expect and what NOT to expect from students.
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