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Learning 3.0 and the Smart eXtended Web

This slide show accompanied a keynote presentation given for the ICL conference in Villach, Austria on 28 September, 2012.

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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30 Ways To Stay Creative (Infographic)

30 Ways To Stay Creative (Infographic) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Here is a list of 30 ways to stay creative! What do you do to stay creative?


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donhornsby's curator insight, August 28, 7:59 AM

 Creative ideas often come to you when you are least expecting.  Don’t stress yourself out, remember, everyone is creative – different people just have different kinds of creativity and processes.

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5 Features That Define the Next Generation Social LMS

5 Features That Define the Next Generation Social LMS | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Social learning has been in existence for ages now. Inherently, man’s basic desire is to observe, learn, and share. Today, social learning is more defined to the extent of being perceived as a formal concept. Leveraging the existing social learning platforms has promoted the culture of learning. Hence, the future of social learning at the workplace lies in continuous social communication and collaboration via personal and technology-enabled methods.
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These 10 trends are shaping the future of education

These 10 trends are shaping the future of education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

It's an exciting time to be in education. The longstanding operating models for both higher ed and K-12 are both in a state of flux, and while demands for innovation probably won't create an all-new landscape, the resulting product of ongoing changes is likely to be unrecognizable compared to that of the last several decades. And while some challenges and changes are exclusive to one sector, a few see some overlap between K-12 and postsecondary learning.  

 

From alternative credentialing and changing demographics to testing concerns and the rise of STEM, here are 10 trends currently shaping the future of education.

 


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Getting Smart on Next-Gen Learning Platforms

Getting Smart on Next-Gen Learning Platforms | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A Getting Smart bundle providing an overview of current next-gen learning platforms, published in partnership with Gates Foundation.

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Free Technology for Teachers: Good Online Bookmarking Tools for Students

Free Technology for Teachers: Good Online Bookmarking Tools for Students | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Earlier today I shared a set of tutorials on using Symbaloo to save and organize bookmarks. Shortly after that post went live I received an email from someone looking for other bookmarking tools that her students could use. Over the years I've tried a lot of bookmarking tools, the following are the ones that I recommend most often.

Via Jim Lerman
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Adobe Flash Fading Away: How It Is Going To Impact The eLearning Industry

Adobe Flash Fading Away: How It Is Going To Impact The eLearning Industry | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Many people in the eLearning industry have been concerned with the latest developments in the Adobe Flash area, because Flash has been for too long the most popular choice of eLearning course developers. But it's not all doom and gloom. Read why.

 

It is common knowledge that Adobe Flash is not supported on iPhones and iPads. While Apple has been a long-standing critic of Flash, recently the software from Adobe found criticism from two more technology companies: Mozilla and Facebook. Recently, Mozilla’s technical team decided to block Adobe Flash from the Firefox browser. And a week before, Facebook’s Chief Security Officer had asked Adobe to announce the end-of-life date for Flash as the software is too vulnerable from a security point of view. In light of these developments, it is widely predicted that the future of Adobe Flash is at risk.

HTML5: The Alternative To Adobe Flash

HTML5 has emerged as a strong alternative for Flash in many areas, including eLearning. The biggest advantage of HTML5 is that is supports multiple devices such as smartphones and tablets. Also, as more and more organizations are moving towards BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), HTML5 is likely to get more popular in the coming years. Here are some of its advantages:

 

* Unlike Flash, HTML5 doesn’t require any plugins.

* HTML5 seamlessly allows inclusion of audio and video files into the code.

* HTML5 is an open technology (unlike Flash, which is controlled by Adobe) and thus it is more flexible.

* All new browsers are incorporating HTML5.

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15 essentials for successful learning

15 essentials for successful learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

1. Most learning is self-directed. Give people the freedom to chart their course. Make sure resources are readily available and easy to find.

 

2. Set high expectations, and people live up to them. Help people make sense of and prosper in the world and the workplace. Facilitate social networks that enable people to compare their situation with others.

 

3. Conversations are the stem cells of learning. Foster open, frequent, frank conversations both virtually and in person. Praise courageous conversations.

 

4. People learn by doing. Encourage experimentation.

 

5/ Ensure that managers and mentors understand the impact of stretch assignments. Learning is experiential, and stretch assignments give learners new experiences.

 

6. Teach people the least they need know to tackle things on their own.

 

7. Make it drop-dead simple to access people in the know, the lessons of experience, how-to information, and performance support.

 

8. Learning is social. Encourage participation in communities. Make collaboration the norm. Narrate your work and share with others. Communities and guilds create and consume knowledge. If you don’t have a vibrant social network, create one.

 

9. More than half of us work part of our time outside of the office. Ensure support is mobile.

 

10. We want what we want, no more. Whenever possible, provide choices. Give employees the pieces to create personalized learning experiences.

 

11. Learning is for everyone, not just novices and up-and-comers. You can’t expect to prosper without it. Make sure everyone’s covered.

 

12. Learning takes reinforcement to stick. Seek feedback. Blog, tweet, and otherwise share your reflections. Revisiting what you learn fixes it in memory.

 

13. Innovation is born of mashing up concepts from different disciplines. Encourage looking outside the box.

 

14. Provide feeds for what’s going on in the team, the department, the company, the industry, and technical disciplines.

 

15. People confuse learning with school. Build lessons on learning how to learn into the organization.


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Best Way to Take Notes In Class Isn't On Your Laptop, Research Finds

Best Way to Take Notes In Class Isn't On Your Laptop, Research Finds | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

For incoming college freshmen, one of the biggest academic challenges is learning ... well, learning how to learn. And experts say that using a laptop to take notes in class is a step in the wrong direction.

The research is clear: Typing out your notes results in decreased comprehension of lecture material.

For one, we're not paying as much attention to the actual words we're typing. Last year, a study out of Princeton and UCLA found that when students take notes on laptops, their "tendency to transcribe lectures verbatim rather than processing information and reframing it in their own words is detrimental to learning."

And the Internet is just so much more fun than a lecture. In 2003, Cornell researchers let half of students browse the Web during a lecture while the other half had to keep their laptops closed. Not surprisingly, the ones who weren't online did better on a post-class quiz.

Worst of all, laptop note-takers may be hurting the learning of their classmates. A 2013 study found that those who could even catch a glimpse of a "multi-tasking" peer's laptop performed 17 percent worse on a comprehension test after the lecture.

 

 

 


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

""The act of typing effectively turns the note-taker into a transcription zombie.""

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Cognitive scientists discover clues in the brain to an extraordinary memory glitch in healthy people

Cognitive scientists discover clues in the brain to an extraordinary memory glitch in healthy people | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Imagine living a healthy, normal life without the ability to re-experience in your mind personal events from your past. You have learned details about past episodes from your life and can recite these to family and friends, but you can’t mentally travel back in time to imagine yourself in any of them.

Cognitive scientists from Baycrest Health Sciences’ Rotman Research Institute in Toronto had a rare opportunity to examine three middle-aged adults (two from the U.S., the other from the U.K.) who essentially live their lives in the “third person” because of a condition known as lifelong severely deficient autobiographical memory (SDAM).

The intriguing findings are posted online in the journal Neuropsychologia, ahead of the print edition.

“Many of us can relate to the idea that people have different abilities when remembering events. What is unique about these individuals is that they have no personal recollection,” said Dr. Brian Levine, senior scientist at Baycrest’s Rotman Research Institute, and senior author on the paper.

“Even though they can learn and recall information normally and hold down professional careers, they cannot re-experience the past with a vivid sense of personal reliving. It’s as if their past was experienced in the third person.”

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Personalized Learning is Hard

Personalized Learning is Hard | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There may or may not also be problems with the software. For what it’s worth, Walercz seems to think highly of the software and doesn’t believe that it is contributing to the poor results. Personally, I think the problems with the match between the student skills and the course design are sufficient to explain the problem. The kind of burden that a self-paced program like this puts on these students is somewhat analogous to the burden that an online course puts on them. We know that the type of population that would be enrolled in a developmental math course in a community college in Newark, NJ typically does not do well in online courses. The difference is that, in ECC’s design, there actually are faculty there to intervene and coach the students personally. It stands to reason that the quality of that coaching would be a critical success factor.

Does this mean that ECC’s approach was a bad idea? I don’t think so. Differentiated instruction is a logical pedagogical response to a heterogeneous class problem. But it can only work in their environment if they have appropriately skilled, trained, and motivated faculty. ECC made substantial investments in software and facilities, but this result highlights the fact that the critical success factors in many cases will be making a substantial investment in providing faculty with appropriate professional development and a motivating compensation and promotion plan. It sounds like they have come to realize that and are taking some steps in that direction.

Truly effective innovation in education is hard. As Phil likes to stress, it takes both brutal honesty regarding the results and a commitment to iterate when the results are almost inevitably not what we hoped for in the first try. A while back, I blogged about an interesting case study at MSU where they did exactly that with a psychology class. If you read the comments thread in the follow-on post, you’ll see that Mike Caulfield brought up a potentially new insight that the course’s DWF pattern may be related to interactions between the course’s absence policy and the blended format. Course problems (and course successes) can be subtle and hard to tease out.
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Blinded by technology: has our belief in Silicon Valley led the world astray?

Blinded by technology: has our belief in Silicon Valley led the world astray? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When Microsoft programmer Kentaro Toyama was sent by his employers to India in 2004, charged with using technology to improve education, he expected to swoop in armed with gadgets and effect whizzy social change. It didn’t quite pan out like that. Toyama had some early successes at Microsoft Research India, including the invention of a device that allowed multiple mice-wielding pupils to control one computer at the same time. (MultiPoint, a problem-fixer for classrooms that had too few computers, won awards.) But he quickly came to see that technology was not the “magic cure” export his employers – and, indeed, many in Silicon Valley – seemed to expect.

In his new book, Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology, he writes that this was “hard to take. I was a computer scientist, a Microsoft employee, and the head of a group that aimed to find digital solutions for the developing world. I wanted nothing more than to see innovation triumph… But exactly where the need was greatest, technology seemed unable to make a difference.” He worked in schools that had been given computers but had no tech support, the broken-down hardware quickly ending up stacked in cupboards. He watched teachers struggle to cope with screen-enthused kids, for whom “a computer was less a help, more hindrance”.

Back in the US, Toyama began to think more widely about the difference in expectation and reality as to the assistance afforded by technology in education. He tried teaching computer science in a classroom full of kids with laptops. He spoke to many parents who felt that, without lessons in the use of digital tools, their kids would be left behind. He saw CEOs and NGOs and politicians try to deal with social problems by hurling tech at them, and began to wonder if they weren’t missing the point. “I worked at a company whose soul was software,” he writes. “I felt disloyal doubting its value.”
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Teaching how to think is just as important as teaching anything else

Teaching how to think is just as important as teaching anything else | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A new paper on teaching critical thinking skills in science has pointed out, yet again, the value of giving students experiences that go beyond simple recall or learned procedures.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Suvi Salo
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Developing Critical Thinking Skills in Elementary Students

Developing Critical Thinking Skills in Elementary Students | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Here are some wonderful tools and strategies for developing critical thinking skills with your elementary school students.

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Charles Fischer's curator insight, Today, 7:32 AM

This is a great structure for younger students in particular. The six question words allow students to analyze nearly anything. For older students, I would certainly add more questions to drive the inquiry even deeper. For example: WHEN: "What was the context in which they said it?" WHY: "Were they trying to inform or persuade?" HOW: "What medium was used to deliver the message? How does that affect the message?"

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European project HEIRRI: RRI in higher education

European project HEIRRI: RRI in higher education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) will lead the European project HEIRRI: Higher Education Institutions & Responsible Research and Innovation, which aims to integrate the concept of “Responsible Re...

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Using New Technology to Rediscover Traditional Ways of Learning

Using New Technology to Rediscover Traditional Ways of Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Digital technology such as tablets can help teachers and students rediscover traditional ways of learning by using touch, movement, sound, and visuality.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, Today, 6:42 AM

Some nice insights here.

Donna Farren's curator insight, Today, 8:35 AM
I think there is a lot of good information that can be applied to distance education here. So many people get caught up in distance learning being text based they forget they can add these types of other tools.
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ICT Facts and Figures

ICT Facts and Figures | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Technological progress, infrastructure deployment, and falling prices have brought unexpected growth in ICT access and connectivity to billions of people around the world. In 2015 there are more than 7 billion mobile cellular subscriptions worldwide, up from less than 1 billion in 2000. Globally 3.2 billion people are using the Internet of which 2 billion are from developing countries


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, Today, 3:38 AM

Great to see some real impact in developing countries.


Norton Gusky's curator insight, Today, 7:36 AM

It's important to see educational technology from a global perspective. ICT (Information communication technology)  is the name that most of the world uses to describe the digital processes that impact learning. 

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Need Reasons To Use Gamification? - Infographic

Need Reasons To Use Gamification? - Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Games in elearning?

It doesn’t seem like this could be of benefit to anyone but as it turns out gamification in elearning is proving quite effective.

If you are currently creating an elearning course or already have courses created then you too may want to incorporate gaming elements.

There are a variety of ways to go about this. Some elearning development tools make it possible to easily add simple gaming elements. Another method is to leverage a learning management system that makes it easy to gamify your learning.

Between these two approaches I believe it makes most sense to find a learning management system that supports gamification. Recent trends show that most LMSs are moving in this direction anyhow so finding one that meets this requirement shouldn’t be too difficult.

But why should you incoproate gamification in your learning management system to begin with? If anything, it just sounds like more work. Is the work really worth the effort?

There isn’t an easy way to answer that question as many factors need to be considered.


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Growing Trend Of High School Students Taking Online College Classes

Growing Trend Of High School Students Taking Online College Classes | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
An increasing number of high school students are enrolling in online college classes, according to a recent New York Times article. College admissions directors commented on this growing trend, as well as its benefits.

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Seth Allen, dean of admissions at Pomona College, said his school has seen online courses on applications from both domestic and international applicants, as well.

 

But Allen warns that MOOCs are not necessary for students already involved in multiple extracurricular activities. He said it's important that the student tries out the classes because they're interested, not because they want to look good on paper.

 

"Where we put value on it is where it demonstrates curiosity rather than achievement," Allen said.


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Collective intelligence


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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 31, 12:49 PM

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=collective+intelligence


MURIEL LESELBAUM's curator insight, Today, 5:44 AM

une bonne référence sur plusieurs expériences concrètes d'intelligence collective

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MOOC Professors' Agency in the Face of Disruption

MOOC Professors' Agency in the Face of Disruption | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Stanford University used MOOCs as an opportunity to create a supportive environment for faculty to explore, create, and express themselves in new ways through open and digital education. Following its early support for MOOCs, Stanford built "soft infrastructure" to incubate good ideas and allow courses to evolve over time.

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5 Levels Of Technology Integration In Curriculum

5 Levels Of Technology Integration In Curriculum | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
he integration of technology in learning is not new. In the 1980s, many schools had fancy calculators, Macintosh computers, and were even teaching students basic coding.

This kind of integration often happened at the lesson or activity level, meaning that it was often surface-level, tacked-on, and perhaps a bit superficial.

The power of technology is difficult to fully leverage without curriculum-level integration. This means choosing tools, platforms, and policies based on standards, assessment, and instruction. A side benefit to this approach is the possibility of teacher collaboration and “same-pageness.”

The following technology integration matrix we spotted over on zzwriter.com‘s excellent blog takes a look at this idea of embedding technology at the curriculum level. Across the top are the levels–similar to our “4 Stages:The Integration of Technology in Learning,” while on the left side are descriptors of what each level might look like in the classroom.
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Best Free Online Applications and Services

Best Free Online Applications and Services | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Online App Index Select an App Category:

 

This list of Best Free Online Applications and Services now includes 230 items in various categories. With these online or web apps and services, you do not need to download and install them into your computer for using them—you just need to open up a browser and access them online.

To quickly find what you want, select an App Category on the top of this page or use the box below to view all items in one massive list.


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Spaces for Learning

Spaces for Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The design of any learning space must be guided by sound principles of learning and the spaces need to be matched to the pedagogy of those who will use them. The most amazing space will fail to enhance learning if it does not suit the needs of its users. There is a danger in hoping that new learning spaces will transform tired pedagogy; a belief that is not reflected by experience.

 


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, August 31, 2:39 AM

Undoubtedly the new learning spaces bring a fresh level of excitement to schools and students quickly fall in love with the options and the playfulness they offer. The challenge for schools is to avoid the lure of shiny new toys and ensure that the adoption of flexible spaces is part of a bigger shift in thinking that includes effective pedagogies and supports for teachers who will be using the new spaces.

Gary Bamford's comment, August 31, 4:01 AM
Trust Google to invent the Joe 90 'cage' ;)
Corrina Phoenix Miss English's curator insight, August 31, 3:30 PM

Do your surroundings affect your ability to learn?

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Safe Browsing Tool | WOT (Web of Trust)

WOT is a free website reputation, rating and review tool that helps find trustworthy websites and protects against online scams, untrustworthy links, and unreliable web stores. Free add-on for Firefox, IE, Chrome, Opera and Safari browsers.

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6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups - TeachThought

6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups - TeachThought | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Grouping students is easy; creating effective student groups is less so.

The following infographic from Mia MacMeekin seeks to provide some ideas to help make group work easier in your classroom. The strength of this particular graphic is in the range of the ideas. The first tip refers teachers to Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal development, which frames student ability in terms of a range: what they can do unassisted, what they can do with the support of a More Knowledgeable Other (MKO), and what they cannot do even with support. This is different for each student, and understanding these ranges for students can help inform grouping decisions, whether you’re using a peer instruction model, ability grouping, or another approach.

Via John Evans, Chris Carter, Suvi Salo
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harloff's curator insight, August 27, 3:48 AM

Nice infographics av very informative.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, August 27, 7:14 AM

Facilitando el trabajo en el aula...6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups - TeachThought | @scoopit via @joevans http://sco.lt/...

Miep Carstensen's curator insight, August 28, 5:40 PM

This is a great info graphic, but I would also add the importance of praising effort.