Learning & Mind &...
Follow
Find
15.2K views | +30 today
 
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Interactive Teaching and Learning
onto Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

Learning 3.0 and the Smart eXtended Web

This slide show accompanied a keynote presentation given for the ICL conference in Villach, Austria on 28 September, 2012.

Via Anne Whaits
more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Learning & Mind & Brain
About Online Learning
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

more...
Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Scoop.it!

OECD Skills Outlook 2015 - Youth, Skills and Employability

OECD Skills Outlook 2015 - Youth, Skills and Employability | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Young people around the world are struggling to enter the labour market. In some OECD countries, one in four 16-29 year-olds is neither employed nor in education or training. The OECD Skills Outlook 2015 shows how improving the employability of youth requires a comprehensive approach. While education , social, and labour market policies have key roles to play, co-ordination between public policies and the private sector is also crucial. The publication, which builds on the results of the 2012 Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) presented in the first edition of the Skills Outlook, also presents examples of successful policies in selected countries.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning and Teaching in an Online Environment
Scoop.it!

How PowerPoint Is Ruining Higher Ed, Explained in One PowerPoint

How PowerPoint Is Ruining Higher Ed, Explained in One PowerPoint | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Cosigning this: How PowerPoint Is Ruining Higher Ed, Explained in One PowerPoint


Via Luciana Viter, Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

The Matthew Effect

The Matthew Effect | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The Matthew effect refers to the notion that “the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.” Research has identified (and any teacher can attest) that some children enter school “wealthier” than their classmates when it comes to literacy foundational skills. Children who start out with advantages, in terms of early reading skills and vocabulary, tend to thrive and grow academically, while “less wealthy” children tend to fall progressively further behind.


With alarming studies like the 30 Million Word Gap reiterating the catastrophic long term effects on students that do not possess these foundational skills, it is incumbent on our country to stem the tide. Consider the graph below that illustrates this point.
And that data just represents the first three years of a child’s life. Now compound this divide over the next three, six, nine, or twelve years (when the children would be sophomores in high school). Research is clear: knowledge of words is knowledge of the world. So, how can we as a collective curb the Matthew effect and level the playing field? Below are a few ideas with which to start the conversation.


Intervention Programs


Early intervention is crucial. High-quality preschool is absolutely essential. All children deserve the opportunity to start their school career on or relatively close to grade level, instead of several years behind.


Additionally, we must advocate for and implement intervention programs in the primary grades to bridge gaps and support student development. All too often, we see intervention programs attempting to mend the disconnects children face in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade. It’s disingenuous. Generally speaking, intervention in 4th and 5th grade is about targeted skill instruction to help pass a test. But if we don’t begin intervention programs until students hit the intermediate grades in elementary school, we’ve missed our opportunity. Our programs should focus on K–3 students. We need to identify gaps and provide remediation early. Without early intervention, the gap widens over time and is almost insurmountable by 4th grade. Research indicates that in 5th grade and above, literacy intervention programs are only successful with about 13 percent of struggling readers.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

This Idea Must Die: Some of the World’s Greatest Thinkers Each Select a Major Misconception Holding Us Back

This Idea Must Die: Some of the World’s Greatest Thinkers Each Select a Major Misconception Holding Us Back | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
From the self to left brain vs. right brain to romantic love, a catalog of broken theories that hold us back from the conquest of Truth.

“To kill an error is as good a service as, and sometimes even better than, the establishing of a new truth or fact,” asserted Charles Darwin in one of the eleven rules for critical thinking known as Prospero’s Precepts. If science and human knowledge progress in leaps and bounds of ignorance, then the recognition of error and the transcendence of falsehood are the springboard for the leaps of progress.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

[INFOGRAPHIC] An Overview of the Principles of Adult Learning

[INFOGRAPHIC] An Overview of the Principles of Adult Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
After humming and hawing I decided that my third instructional design/learning themed infographic would be the Principles of Adult Learning. Now, I will be honest and say that while I knew a few principles (adults have experience, adults like control over their learning experiences, etc.) I was lacking in my overall knowledge in that area. Creating an infographic is a great cure to this. I need to research, read articles and gather the appropriate information. Then I have to boil it down to its most simple form and try to find visuals that represent what I am trying to communicate. Anyways, it’s a good learning process.

I thought I would jump online and quickly find the “list” of the 6 adult learning principles, or whatever. No such list exists. After much reading I have come to find out that there is no actual official consensus on what the principles of adult learning are. Many are generally agreed upon, but there is still much theoretical debate going on for each proposed principle
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

The Flipped Classroom: A Survey of Research

The Flipped Classroom: A Survey of Research | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Recent advances in technology and in ideology have unlocked entirely new directions for education research. Mounting pressure from increasing tuition costs and free, online course offerings is opening discussion and catalyzing change in the physical classroom. The flipped classroom is at the center of this discussion. The flipped classroom is a new pedagogical method, which em- ploys asynchronous video lectures and practice problems as homework, and active, group-based problem solving activities in the classroom. It represents a unique combination of learning theories once thought to be incompatible—active, problem-based learning activities founded upon a constructivist ideology and instructional lectures derived from direct instruction methods founded upon behaviorist principles.

This paper provides a comprehensive survey of prior and ongoing research of the flipped classroom. Studies are characterized on several dimensions. Among others, these include the type of in-class and out-of-class activities, the measures used to evaluate the study, and methodological characteristics for each study. Results of this survey show that most studies conducted to date explore student perceptions and use single-group study designs. Reports of student perceptions of the flipped classroom are somewhat mixed, but are generally positive overall. Students tend to prefer in-person lectures to video lectures, but prefer interactive classroom activities over lectures. Anecdotal evidence suggests that student learning is improved for the flipped compared to traditional classroom. However, there is very little work investigating student learning outcomes objectively. We recommend for future work studies investigating of objective learning outcomes using controlled experimental or quasi-experimental designs. We also recommend that researchers carefully consider the theoretical framework used to guide the design of in-class activities.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Harnessing the Power of a Subject Matter Expert (SME)

Harnessing the Power of a Subject Matter Expert (SME) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What happens when you have a Subject Matter Expert (SME) and an Instructional Designer (or an eLearning program developer) in one room?

You have a creative meeting that ends with a specific outline for the course, complete with interactivity nodes highlighted. And of course, a very confident instructional designer who knows the program would sell before it hit the shelves!!

This is because the material is both learner and organization centered, stemming from core objectives.

Without an SME, the eLearning content is as incomplete as a great website without accurate and current content! The goal here is not necessarily to create compelling content with smooth slide turner interactions, but to work with the expert in order to really spin the program towards a very time and cost efficient direction.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Effective Education
Scoop.it!

Data integration made easy with open source Karma | Opensource.com

Data integration made easy with open source Karma | Opensource.com | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Karma is a free, open source tool that makes it easy to convert data from a variety of formats into linked data.

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Effective Education
Scoop.it!

3 rules to spark learning

3 rules to spark learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

It took a life-threatening condition to jolt chemistry teacher Ramsey Musallam out of ten years of “pseudo-teaching” to understand the true role of the educator: to cultivate curiosity. In a fun and personal talk, Musallam gives 3 rules to spark imagination and learning, and get students excited about how the world works.

 

 


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Interactive Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

Creative Commons Attribution license quick and awesome review

Creative common license pros and cons quick and awesome review. 


Via Anne Whaits
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Thinking, Learning, and Laughing
Scoop.it!

Why You Need Emotional Intelligence to Succeed

Why You Need Emotional Intelligence to Succeed | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
When emotional intelligence first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70% of the time.

Via Helen Teague
more...
Helen Teague's curator insight, May 24, 7:08 PM

By Dr. Travis Bradberry                                                                           "Emotional Intelligence is the "something" in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions that achieve positive results. Emotional intelligence is made up of four core skills that pair up under two primary competencies: personal competence and social competence."

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning with MOOCs
Scoop.it!

Self directed learning in trial future learn courses

Presentation on FutureLearn trial courses given at emoocs2015 in Mons, Belgium

Via Vladimir Kukharenko, Luciana Viter, Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

A blended e-learning approach to intercultural training by Joan M. Stewart


Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, May 25, 5:48 PM

How do you go about designing blended intercultural e-learning?

Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

A Brief History of Instructional Design | Origin Learning

A Brief History of Instructional Design | Origin Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Instructional Design has come a long way. From ‘training’, which was merely considered a passive function in an organization, the emphasis has now shifted towards making learning and talent development an integral part of corporate culture. A 2015 research by ATD, titled ‘Instructional Design Now’, which is based on a survey of 1,120 instructional designers provides a current snapshot of ID in organizations and the challenges that they typically face. “The field of instructional design (ID) incorporates a rapidly growing and changing array of learning strategies, tools, and approaches into training experiences that appeal to today’s workers while meeting their complex learning needs.”

Like everything else, this drastic change in approach hasn’t been fast. It has been a slow process of evolution dating back to World War II – from where ID finds its roots. Here is a brief history of how ID has changed over the years to take its present shape.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning with MOOCs
Scoop.it!

Designing effective moocs

Designing effective MOOCs Positional paper for the Design Issues and Participation in MOOCs Symposium at the Internationalization, Cross-border Education and E…

Via SusanBat
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

The Pedagogy of Trolls - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Pedagogy of Trolls - Hybrid Pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Andrew Shaw’s “The College Experience: A Modern-Day Paddy West?” demonstrates the value of asking undergraduates to prepare and publish assignments. As an historian of the early modern world, Shaw was able to make a meaningful contribution to an on-going discussion of #FutureEd that was taking place on the HASTAC website as well as other venues. Reflecting on her experiences of engaging in a global discussion, undergraduate Suzanne Hakim comments that never in her academic career has she “been able to connect and share thoughts and opinions with my peers and multiple professors on an intellectual level.” The experience of publishing was refreshing because she was treated with respect as a colleague with independent thoughts.

Asking students to participate in scholarly dialogues gives them the ability to participate in scholarly conversation, to manage different viewpoints and different ways to express them, and to participate in thorough and respectful debate about important issues.

While the benefits undergraduates receive by publishing meaningful assignments is undeniable, there is a dark side to asking students to publicly share their work; something Leslie Nirro learned after publishing “Breaking Down Barriers Between the Humanities and Sciences” in The Chronicle of Higher Education. After reading her analysis, labronx — an individual who hides behind his anonymity — commented “Oh good God, what an idiot!” He later referred to “this author’s stupidity” without really engaging in the arguments she presented because his goal is “to get people (and myself) comfortable with bashing feminism.”

Nirro had been attacked by a troll.

Learning to deal with trolls, controversy, and criticism is educationally important. But the time to begin teaching students these lessons is prior to publication; not after they have been attacked.

After having students read blog postings, comments, and articles on which they might comment, I have them write a publishable response but request that they not publish it. The publishable comments are then vetted in class and the students receive additional coaching from me. Only after students have had the ability to practice and gain confidence in their abilities, do I ask that they publish.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Moodle and Web 2.0
Scoop.it!

10 ways to socialise your Mahara ePortfolio

Presentation by Pascale Hyboud-Peron (ThinkAgency, NZ) at Mahara Hui in Auckland, New Zealand, on 9 April 2015.

Slides are available at http://www.slideshare.net/maharahuinz...


Via Sigi Jakob, Juergen Wagner
more...
Sigi Jakob's curator insight, May 25, 10:17 AM

Excellent demonstration on the social features and functions of MAHARA

Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Forget the internet of things – we need an internet of people

Forget the internet of things – we need an internet of people | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The internet of things is a vision of ubiquitous connectivity, driven by one basic idea: screens are not the only gateway to the ultimate network of networks.

With sensors, code and infrastructure, any object – from a car, to a cat, to a barcode - can become networked. But the question we need to ask is: should they be? And, if so, how?

Public debate over the internet of things is polarised. Commentators tend to voice either excessive optimism or total scepticism, with precious little in between.
From enchanted, to cursed

The optimists describe a magical realm of “enchanted objects”, where our possessions gently anticipate our every need. The umbrella’s handle glows blue when it is forecast to rain; the connected fridge reminds us when we’re out of milk. Our households become well-oiled machines, as elegantly efficient as any Victorian manor-house – but with no servants’ wages to pay (or at least, not ones we can see).

The other camp paints a darker picture. They claim that, at best, the internet of things is just another excuse for rampant consumerism, whose only contribution will be to clog basements with yet more unnecessary junk.

But at worst, everyday household objects will be turned into enemy spies, placing us under constant surveillance. We will be nudged and manipulated at every moment. Our lives and possessions will be perpetually exposed to hackers. The internet of things will fill our homes with objects all right, but those objects are far from enchanted – they are cursed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Active Learning Increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics

Active Learning Increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Biology professors from the Universities of Washington and Maine have done a meta-analysis of 225 studies on active learning. The results were just accepted for publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences. The abstract is below.

Abstract
To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes—although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

AN APPROACH TO GLOBAL NETIQUETTE RESEARCH

ABSTRACT The user base of the Internet is today more diverse than ever. People with different cultural backgrounds may have very different views on some crucial Internet-related matters, such as the regulation of the Internet, the responsibility of an individual in the Internet, copyright issues, issues of anonymity, and so forth. Differing opinions on these matters have already roused heated debates. Although there are a number of local codes of conduct for proper behavior on the Internet, and although countries have set laws and regulations concerning the net, there are almost no studies on the set of rules that would be commonly agreed on by all users of the Internet, in all their cultural diversity. In this paper we propose a study that will be based on established qualitative, anthropological methods, and that aims at finding a commonly agreed core set of rules for appropriate use of the Internet.

 

KEYWORDS Netiquette; Global Netiquette; Multicultural Web Communities; Cultural Dialogue


Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, May 25, 5:40 PM

The authors define Netiquette as, "In this paper we use the term netiquette to mean a body of conventions and manners for using the Internet as a tool for communication or data exchange, practiced or advocated by a group of people. In this sense, netiquette includes laws, regulations, as well as good manners and practices."


The idea of a Global Netiquette is intriguing.  

Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Meet Learner 2.0 | Learning with 'e's

Meet Learner 2.0 | Learning with 'e's | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Brisbane for EduTech next week, and the theme for my talk is 'Meet Learner 2.0'. I want my audience of mainly higher education teachers to think about the cohort of students that is now coming through the doors of universities. Generally they are young people who have no memory of the last century (the one we were all brought up and educated in), and have been immersed in technology their entire lives. They are younger than the Internet and mobile phones, and they don't recall a time when there was no Google or Facebook. They are residents in the digital age and they carry their connection with them wherever they go. This results in a number of repercussions for education.

We are witnessing a shift in education that is likely to be profound. It is a shift in the roles of teachers and learners, and it is one that will alter the relationships we are familiar with. The shift is occurring in the responsibility that learners are adopting to learn for themselves. Teachers have long been advised to become 'guides on the side' so that learners can take responsibility. From Socrates through to Dewey, far sighted and progressive philosophers and theorists have consistently argued that students learn better when they lead their own discovery. But very few educators ever took up this challenge, preferring instead to remain 'in control' of the process of education, the expert sage taking centre stage. The advent of digital technology challenges this traditional model of education.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

New Facebook Study Reveals Psychological Motivation Behind Status Updates

New Facebook Study Reveals Psychological Motivation Behind Status Updates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A new study has reinforced what many already suspected – people who constantly post Facebook status updates about their relationships are insecure, while people who post about their gym sessions and healthy meals are egotistical.

The research, conducted by Brunel University in London, suggests that those who are insecure regularly post updates about their relationship status in order to garner attention, and likes, in order to disctract from their own feelings of insecurity. Conversely, egotists tend to post about their achievements in order to get the boost of likes and comments, reinforcing their sense of self. In this sense, the Facebook eco-system can form a sort of validation for personality traits and types.

So is this a good thing? Should we be validating egotism by through the endorsement of Likes and comments? Do we really ‘like’ such updates, or do we simply interact with them as a form of support? Such questions formed the basis for this research, and frame the greater context around the psychology of Facebook and what it means in a wider sense.

An Influential Relationship

In a previous, and controversial, study, Facebook researchers found that by manipulating the News Feeds of users, they were able to affect the moods of the users themselves. The data scientists restricted the content shown to more than 689,000 users, removing either positive or negative updates from their feeds in order to see how those actions influenced the content posted by the affected parties. The result? The study found that the inputs people received, via their News Feeds, did, absolutely, affect their moods. People were outraged when the results were made public, with many criticising Facebook for actively manipulating the emotional states of their users – users whom they could not possible know the emotional states of. What if they’d brought down the mood of someone who was already depressed?

The potential dangers of such experiments are frightening, but in a wider context, the study showed just how powerful The Social Network had become. Not only is it where 936 million people log-in daily to get the latest updates from friends and family, it’s also become one of our main media inputs, influencing how we think, see and act. It’s that influence that has Facebook positioned as one of the most powerful media players in the world, the keeper of the biggest trove of audience data in our history – but it also positions the network in an unprecedented position of influence, and one which could be abused.

Psychological Interpretation

Does it matter if we know the background, the why, of why users post certain things on Facebook? It’s of interest, of course, many users see positive updates from friends, like a positive relationship status update, and they’ll invariably compare their own scenario to the poster, often times negatively. We’ve all experienced this in some way, seeing how well other people are doing and comparing our own situation in a ‘grass is always greener’ type scenario. This latest research underlines that Facebook updates are not necessarily 100% reflective of the reality of a situation. People post in order to get a reaction – people post about their health regimen in order to get positive reinforcement, about their relationships because they crave support. While to the plain observer it may seem that these people have it all, it’s important to consider that everyone posts selectively, what you’re seeing is not necessarily an all-inclusive documentation of that users’ life.

The key element of this is, don’t take it all to heart. Don’t compare yourself to the lives of other based on their Facebook activity – it’s unfair to you and unrealistic for them. Recognise that there’s often more meaning to such updates than what you may see on the surface.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Web-Based Course Assessment Tool with Direct Mapping to Student Outcomes


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning and Teaching in an Online Environment
Scoop.it!

Blended Learning in Finland


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Official AndreasCY, Luciana Viter, Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miloš Bajčetić
Scoop.it!

Continuous learning : it’s a mindset not a technology or product

Continuous learning : it’s a mindset not a technology or product | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

In this fast-moving world, we constantly need to learn new stuff. In the workplace, this is particularly important, as I showed in an earlier blog post, where Jacob Morgan talks of the future employee moving from “knowledge worker” (knowing stuff) to “learning worker” (learning new stuff).

So how can organisations support continuous learning at work?

1. It doesn’t mean creating more training or e-learning and force-feeding it to people. It means encouraging and supporting individuals to continuously learn for themselves.

 

2. It doesn’t mean trying to manage everyone’s learning for them – and trying to track it all in a LMS, It means everyone taking responsibility for their own learning, and managers measuring success in terms of job and team performance.

Of course, many individuals are already doing this – as a natural part of who they are – and that is what is giving them a personal competitive edge at work (as well as in life). They are always aware of what they learning, they seek out new opportunities to do so, and they share their thoughts (often in their blogs).

more...
No comment yet.