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Learning 3.0 and the Smart eXtended Web

This slide show accompanied a keynote presentation given for the ICL conference in Villach, Austria on 28 September, 2012.

Via Anne Whaits
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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from The future of medicine and health
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Why your brain acts like a jazz band - Futurity

Why your brain acts like a jazz band - Futurity | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The human brain improvises while its rhythm section keeps up a steady beat. But when it comes to taking on intellectually challenging tasks, groups of neurons tune in to one another for a fraction of a second and harmonize, then go back to improvising, according to new research.

These findings, reported in the journal Nature Neuroscience, could pave the way for more targeted treatments for people with brain disorders marked by fast, slow, or chaotic brain waves, also known as neural oscillations.

Tracking the changing rhythms of the healthy human brain at work advances our understanding of such disorders as Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and even autism, which are characterized in part by offbeat brain rhythms. In jazz lingo, for example, bands of neurons in certain mental illnesses may be malfunctioning because they’re tuning in to blue notes, or playing double time or half time.
“The human brain has 86 billion or so neurons all trying to talk to each other in this incredibly messy, noisy, and electrochemical soup,” says study lead author Bradley Voytek. “Our results help explain the mechanism for how brain networks quickly come together and break apart as needed.”

Via Wildcat2030
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from With My Right Brain
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Encoding and Retrieving Memories: Understanding Hippcampal Function at the Cellular Level

Encoding and Retrieving Memories: Understanding Hippcampal Function at the Cellular Level | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Researchers report the successful memory encoding and retrieval occurs in the dorsal area of the rat hippocampus.


Via Emre Erdogan
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Development of global health education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a student-driven initiative

Development of global health education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a student-driven initiative | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Global health is increasingly present in the formal educational curricula of medical schools across North America. In 2008, students at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) perceived a lack of structured global health education in the existing curriculum and began working with the administration to enhance global health learning opportunities, particularly in resource-poor settings. Key events in the development of global health education have included the introduction of a global health intersession mandatory for all first-year students; required pre-departure ethics training for students before all international electives; and the development of a clinical global health elective (Global Health Leadership Program, GHLP). The main challenges to improving global health education for medical students have included securing funding, obtaining institutional support, and developing an interprofessional program that benefits from the resources of the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing. Strategies used included objectively demonstrating the need for and barriers to more structured global health experiences; obtaining guidance and modifying existing resources from other institutions and relevant educational websites; and harnessing institution-specific strengths including the large Johns Hopkins global research footprint and existing interprofessional collaborations across the three schools. The Johns Hopkins experience demonstrates that with a supportive administration, students can play an important and effective role in improving global health educational opportunities. The strategies we used may be informative for other students and educators looking to implement global health programs at their own institutions.
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Using Technology to Improve how the Brain Learns — Emerging Education Technologies

Using Technology to Improve how the Brain Learns — Emerging Education Technologies | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
It is common knowledge that an array of technological advancements have made many medical miracles a reality over the centuries. The ways in which technologies are being applied to solve medical problems is accelerating at an ever-more-rapid pace.

While learning is not “a medical problem”, it is certainly a “brain problem”, and the brain is our most advanced organ. We’ve barely begin to understand how this amazing mass of cells works. Along these lines, I’m fascinated by the possibilities for information or ‘computer’ technologies to be leveraged to help the mind grow and enhance learning, much as other technologies have been used to help other human organs thrive.
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 28, 12:53 PM

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eLearning Development Checklist Infographic

eLearning Development Checklist Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Despite great content and graphics, things can go wrong. The eLearning Development Checklist Infographic lists a few points to consider which may save your time and money when you develop your eLearning courses.
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Do You Speak Millennialish? Using eLearning as a Tool for Professional and Personal Growth

Do You Speak Millennialish? Using eLearning as a Tool for Professional and Personal Growth | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There’s a mindset that’s already in the workplace, thanks to us who are, well, older than the Millennials on our teams. We tend to separate work from play, training from entertainment, and tools from toys. Again, our Millennials are far more likely to integrate these seemingly disparate worlds. One of the reasons why eLearning is so vital to personal and professional growth is the blurring of the lines between work and play. It’s a lesson that all of us can learn. Perhaps one of the safest bits of advice for us non-Millennials is this: we gotta learn to lighten up.

Up until this generation of incoming workers, professional and personal growth was something you mostly pursued on your own. From time to time, you might be offered a chance to develop yourself professionally through work-related courses.
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Teaching in Higher Education
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How to Win a Nobel Prize, According To a Nobel Prize Winner - And What It Has To Do With Learning - InformED

How to Win a Nobel Prize, According To a Nobel Prize Winner - And What It Has To Do With Learning - InformED | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Not everyone is destined to win a Nobel Prize, but a close examination of past winners' practices suggests we all have control over the way we approach l

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, July 27, 4:48 PM

Great article. I particularly liked #11 - Don't hold on to what you don't need. 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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How to Enable the Hidden Windows 7 Admin Account Using the Registry

How to Enable the Hidden Windows 7 Admin Account Using the Registry | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Imagine you have a Windows PC with a single user account, and you just lost your password. Here’s how to enable the hidden Administrator account with nothing more than the install CD and some registry hacking magic so you can reset your password.

Via Luke Allen, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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The highest form of intelligence: Sarcasm increases creativity for both expressers and recipients

The highest form of intelligence: Sarcasm increases creativity for both expressers and recipients | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Despite sarcasm’s nasty reputation, new research finds that it can boost creativity and problem-solving in the workplace.

 

Despite being the lingua franca of the Internet, sarcasm isn’t known as a sophisticated form of wit or a conversational style that wins friends. From the Greek and Latin for “to tear flesh,” sarcasm has been called “hostility disguised as humor,” the contempt-laden speech favored by smart alecks and mean girls that’s best to avoid.


But new research by Francesca Gino of Harvard Business School, Adam Galinsky, the Vikram S. Pandit Professor of Business at Columbia Business School, and Li Huang of INSEAD, the European business school, finds that sarcasm is far more nuanced, and actually offers some important, overlooked psychological and organizational benefits.


“To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking,” said Gino via email.


While practitioners of sarcasm have long believed intuitively that the “mental gymnastics” it requires indicate “superior cognitive processes” at work, the authors say, it hasn’t been clear until now in which direction the causal link flowed, or that sarcasm boosted creativity in those receiving it, not just those dishing it out.


“Not only did we demonstrate the causal effect of expressing sarcasm on creativity and explore the relational cost sarcasm expressers and recipients have to endure, we also demonstrated, for the first time, the cognitive benefit sarcasm recipients could reap. Additionally, for the first time, our research proposed and has shown that to minimize the relational cost while still benefiting creatively, sarcasm is better used between people who have a trusting relationship,” said Gino.


In a series of studies, participants were randomly assigned to conditions labeled sarcastic, sincere, or neutral. As part of a simulated conversation task, they then expressed something sarcastic or sincere, received a sarcastic or sincere reply, or had a neutral exchange.


“Those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone,” said Galinsky via email. “That being said, although not the focus of our research, it is possible that naturally creative people are also more likely to use sarcasm, making it an outcome instead of [a] cause in this relationship.”


Of course, using sarcasm at work or in social situations is not without risk. It’s a communication style that can easily lead to misunderstanding and confusion or, if it’s especially harsh, bruised egos or acrimony. But if those engaged in sarcasm have developed mutual trust, there’s less chance for hurt feelings, the researchers found, and even if conflict arises, it won’t derail the creative gains for either party.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Education 2.0 & 3.0
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Seven things security experts do to keep safe online

Seven things security experts do to keep safe online | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
From using password managers to checking urls, best practices revealed in new study
Cybersecurity experts aren’t like you or I, and now we have the evidence to prove it.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Educational Technology News
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This Is What Today's Online Learning Content Tells Us About The Future Of School

This Is What Today's Online Learning Content Tells Us About The Future Of School | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Today’s children are extremely savvy. They’ve grown up in a world where information was always just a button away. Buttons? Soon, they won’t even need buttons. With Windows 10, they’ll simply say, “hey Cortana.” She’s more like the world’s greatest librarian than a personal assistant. She delivers content on command. [...]

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Screencast-o-Matic Pro at YSJ

Screencast-o-Matic Pro at YSJ | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
For quite a while now, Staff & Students at YSJ have been recording screencasts for a variety of reasons, in a range of different ways, and using many different tools (including Screencast-o-Matic, Jing, Screenr, Screencastify, Camtasia Relay, Camtasia Studio etc.)! Common uses for screencasts at YSJ include software demonstrations, assessment feedback, video lectures, student presentations, mid-module evaluation, or module/assessment information.
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Learnification Of Gaming

Learnification Of Gaming | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Gamification of learning is a well known concept; we use artifacts known from games to motivate people to learn. In this article I would like to discuss a contradictory idea: Learnification of gaming. Thinking about it I am wondering how we can better use games for by-the-way learning.
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Assessment | Learning and Teaching | Coaching
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Growth Mindset

Growth Mindset | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ines Bieler
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Effective Education
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E-learning is not a “silver bullet”

E-learning is not a “silver bullet” | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Traditional teaching should happen in conjunction with technology solutions that benefit the process of learning and teaching rather than trying to replace it, says an expert.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rog Rothe's curator insight, Today, 1:53 AM

I scooped this because it will be interesting should Obama get his high-speed internet spread into the rest of the areas of the country.  I have been thinking all week about the graphic that Dr. D showed us in relation to internet access and socio-economic indications. 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Edtech and assessment
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Cloud technology: the advantages and disadvantages for universities

Cloud technology: the advantages and disadvantages for universities | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Jeremy Sharp looks at the perks and pitfalls for universities using cloud-based serives

Via Julie Tardy
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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, July 28, 12:50 PM

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Study documents how shifts in unemployment rates lead to shifts in college majors

Study documents how shifts in unemployment rates lead to shifts in college majors | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Conventional wisdom holds that in bad economic times, students are more likely to make academic decisions that favor fields perceived to be paths to jobs, and jobs that pay well. Despite plenty of evidence that liberal arts graduates also have successful careers, undergraduates (and their parents) tend in tough times to encourage majors in business and engineering or other fields that seem to promise employment.

A new paper backs up that conventional wisdom with precise data on how high unemployment rates shift students' majors. While both male and female students shift, they do so in different ways. And they both move away from the liberal arts and education when unemployment goes up.

In total, the paper estimates that every increase of 1 percent in the unemployment rate prompts a 3.2 percentage point reallocation of the major choices of men, and 4.1 percentage points for women. In periods of significant increases in unemployment rates, the consequences could be significant for many students' enrollment patterns.

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Top 10 Cloud myths busted, part 1 - TalentLMS Blog

Top 10 Cloud myths busted, part 1 - TalentLMS Blog | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Cloud computing remains a mystery for many enterprise departments and businesses, and there are plenty of myths built up around deploying and running applications on it.

Let’s wear our myth-busters suits, and clean up those myths once and for all.
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Teaching in Higher Education
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Modifying the Flipped Classroom: The "In-Class" Version

Modifying the Flipped Classroom: The "In-Class" Version | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Jennifer Gonzalez proposes the In-Class Flip, a modified version of the flipped-learning model that incorporates the video lecture element as one of several stations that students visit during their class period.

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, July 27, 4:37 PM

This is more relevant to K-12 learning environments, but the basic ideas can be adapted to higher education. I see good applications in any language class. 

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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17 Run Commands that Every Windows User Should Know

17 Run Commands that Every Windows User Should Know | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We previously shared 20 of the most used Run Commands for Windows users. Looking for more? Here are 17 more Run Commands that you should know about.

Via Luke Allen, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Essay on whether academe knows how to judge teaching

Essay on whether academe knows how to judge teaching | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

When someone wins an award for outstanding research or artistic expression, we understand that the person has made a critical discovery or created something unique and significant; but when a person wins a teaching award, what do we think he or she did to deserve it? Do we believe the recipient did something extraordinary and important, or do we attribute it to less admirable reasons, such as being popular among students? In my experience, the most positive reasons people give to explain why a colleague won a teaching award is that the person is especially passionate or dedicated to teaching. We applaud colleagues who win teaching awards who have sacrificed in some way for teaching, or who have worked to make their classes particularly fun and engaging, or who inspire students to excel.

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Professional Development: 21st Century Education: Preparing Today’s School for Tomorrow’s Future

Professional Development: 21st Century Education: Preparing Today’s School for Tomorrow’s Future | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The world is changing in exponential ways due to technology. Education is not an exception. Consumers are turning into producers. Kindergarteners are turning into authors with a worldwide audience.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Where Does Innovative Teaching Come From?

Where Does Innovative Teaching Come From? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There’s a long-standing tradition of informal sharing of pedagogical innovation among K-12 teachers and a whole line of research on this phenomenon, which is known as teacher leadership. The same type of informal faculty leadership exists in higher education as well, but there is very little research on this topic, according to Pete Turner, education faculty member and director of the Teacher Education Institute at Estrella Mountain Community College.

In an effort to better understand informal faculty leadership in higher education, Turner conducted a study that combined faculty surveys and administrator interviews at three Landmark Learning Colleges identified by the League for Innovation in the Community College. “I wanted to find examples of informal faculty leadership. And I wanted to identify administrative practices that helped foster it and move it forward and the factors that impede it,” Turner says.

Turner coined the term “informal faculty leadership.” “It’s informal in that it doesn’t apply to elected or appointed positions. It doesn’t apply to division chairs or faculty senate presidents, although they certainly can practice informal faculty leadership. But what we’re talking about is faculty members spreading innovation to other faculty members. It’s about causing institutional change simply by a faculty member trying out something different, and as it works, spreading the word,” Turner says.
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

Collaboration can help move one faculty member’s innovation from the individual to the institutional level.

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Feeling Like An Expert Has An Ironic Effect On Your Actual Knowledge

Feeling Like An Expert Has An Ironic Effect On Your Actual Knowledge | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Know-it-alls’ don’t know as much as they think, new research finds.

The more people think they know about a topic, the more likely they are to claim that totally made-up facts are true, psychologists have found.

In the study, 100 people were given a general knowledge quiz about personal finance.

They were also shown a list of financial terms which were mostly real.

Mostly. But not all.

In fact, three terms were made up: ‘pre-rated stocks’, ‘fixed-rate deduction’ and ‘annualized credit’.

People who thought they were financial experts were more likely to claim they knew all about these three totally bogus terms.
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Modern Learners Speak Out. Listen to What They Have to Say!

Modern Learners Speak Out. Listen to What They Have to Say! | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
These are a few of the words that leading analyst firm Bersin by Deloitte uses to describe the modern learner. And they should come as no surprise. Technological advances, increasing customer demands, stiffer competition, and rapidly changing products are transforming the traditional workplace—along with what, and how, employees need to learn. Yet, while organizations should be delivering training that meets modern learners’ changing needs, many businesses are stuck using outdated approaches that simply fall short.

Here’s what three modern learners from three separate industries (information technology, health care, and retail) have to say about the challenges they face and how organizations can provide the best support.
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