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Learning 3.0 and the Smart eXtended Web

This slide show accompanied a keynote presentation given for the ICL conference in Villach, Austria on 28 September, 2012.

Via Anne Whaits
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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Intelligent Structured Content

Intelligent Structured Content | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We need a true single-source method that would enable learning developers to author content in one place and publish into the various materials they will share with learners. In addition, the ideal solution would be able to interpret and make connections between different pieces of content. Enter Intelligent Structured Content.
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“Waiting for Carnot”: Information and complexity

The relationship between information and complexity is analyzed using a detailed literature analysis. Complexity is a multifaceted concept, with no single agreed definition. There are numerous approaches to defining and measuring complexity and organization, all involving the idea of information. Conceptions of complexity, order, organization, and “interesting order” are inextricably intertwined with those of information. Shannon's formalism captures information's unpredictable creative contributions to organized complexity; a full understanding of information's relation to structure and order is still lacking. Conceptual investigations of this topic should enrich the theoretical basis of the information science discipline, and create fruitful links with other disciplines that study the concepts of information and complexity.

 

“Waiting for Carnot”: Information and complexity
David Bawden and Lyn Robinson

Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Early View

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.23535


Via Complexity Digest, Jocelyn Stoller
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights for Learners
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The 18 best blogging platforms on the internet in 2015

The 18 best blogging platforms on the internet in 2015 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Despite ongoing cries that blogging is slowly dying, there are still tons of people looking to start new blogs for the first time or move to a better home on the…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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It’s Time to Reform Learning Measurement

It’s Time to Reform Learning Measurement | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Our lives are increasingly data rich. The demands for educational measurement continue to grow—from the epics of students’ high-stakes testing, the politics of teacher measurement (and pay), higher education’s quest towards competency-based education, and professional learning’s venturing into the world of micro-credentials and new-age certificates. Our current measurement tools are at best mediocre for the learner, and downright abysmal for hiring managers. Given the accelerating change in the way people learn, the world is ripe for a stronger way to signal learning and skills aptitude.

 

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Jarrod Johnson's curator insight, May 23, 8:32 PM

Discussion on shortcomings of GPA and grade based system

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Effective Instructional Graphics in eLearning

Effective Instructional Graphics in eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Instructional graphics are great training aids and can make the difference between a so-so course and a great course. Graphics come in many shapes, sizes, layouts, colors, and complexities. They are more than just a simple picture of a person or an office. Graphics can portray steps in a process, pieces of a concept, interaction between people, emotions, and much more.

The true test of an instructional graphic: Can we look at it and understand the concept without reading the supporting text?

The challenge is, to create effective instructional graphics can be time consuming and costly. To help with this, we provide over 9000 premade PowerPoint graphics and offer them within our PowerPoint Graphic library. The graphics are 100% editable within PowerPoint and can export to nearly any software. Let’s take a quick look.
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13 Real-World Examples of How Content Curation Can Be Monetized

Real-world examples showing how gathering, collecting, organising and adding value to existing available information can create useful and economically sustain…

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, May 23, 8:32 AM



If it is true that *attention* is the one of the highest valued intangible assets, whoever is capable to provide a solution that saves people time (and frustration, effort, comparing, verifying, etc.) in getting what they want / need, will likely get lots of it. 


For example, if I could save you all of the time that you would need to:
 

- find all the journalists that could cover your startup and their email
- get the full story on what is happening in a specific market sector
- choose the ideal set of free online courses to achieve a skillset 
- find easily the old, downloadable version of your favorite software 

- know which are all of the events devoted to "x" that are coming up

wouldn't you be willing to pay for it?


For some of these, I probably would.


In this slide deck from the "Art of Content Curation" event that took place this past January in Amsterdam, you can find 13 examples of websites, blogs, startups and web companies that have a created a sustainable, if not altogether profitable business, by collecting, filtering, organising, adding value and presenting in uniquely effective ways, existing information, already available online. 

If you are wondering whether it is actually possible to create an online business around the art of content curation, here are some tangible, real-world examples, that you can look at.


For each one you will find a number of screenshots and a synthetic info card summarising the service that they offer and their business model.


First shown on January 15th 2015 at the "Art of Content Curation" event in Amsterdam.  

Original slide deck: http://www.slideshare.net/RobinGood/the-business-of-content-curation-48467720 

 



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Beating online distraction - IOL SciTech

Beating online distraction - IOL SciTech | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
It's that concentration-challenged group of people that Cornell researcher Richard Patterson opted to study in a working paper recently published on the school's Higher Education Research Institution web site. (It has not yet been published in an academic journal.) Patterson, a PhD candidate in policy analysis and management at Cornell, saw an opportunity to apply behavioural economics research to online education.

“Across the educational spectrum, online students are completing at lower rates than students in traditional courses,” Patterson said in an interview. “There's a real tension between the structure that helps people stay on track and the autonomy that helps people (work) more creatively.”

He thought software tools that have proliferated in recent years – to help people block time-sucking websites, set up reminders to stay on task, or even cut off internet access for the hopelessly distracted – might help him see what works and what doesn't. So Patterson reached out to the company behind a tool he'd been using himself, RescueTime, to see whether they'd be willing to customise their software to help him.
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4 Ways To Apply Instructional Interactivity In eLearning

4 Ways To Apply Instructional Interactivity In eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
How to apply Instructional Interactivity In eLearning. Check 4 Ways that eLearning Professionals can use to apply Instructional Interactivity In eLearning.

Via EDTC@UTB, WebTeachers, Luciana Viter, Peter Mellow
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Gamification: Effective or Ineffective?

Gamification: Effective or Ineffective? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Gaming technology is improving at breakneck speed and alongside, amping up the fun factor too. But, is L&D using this advance in technology to make L&D engaging and enjoyable for learners?

Gamification is the process of applying gaming designs and concepts to learning or training scenarios in order to make them more engaging and entertaining for the learner. Gamification is generally considered the type of game experience where the learner competes with other learners, as opposed to competing with the embedded technology (such as in simulations.)
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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Innovation vs. Creativity

Advertising agencies are obsessed with innovation. They also have one of the most unique sets of creative talent of any industry. Yet the creative department is the most suspicious of "innovation" of any group at the agency. Could it be that actually Creative Directors hold the keys to converting ad agencies into what so many desire: innovation partners to clients?


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning with MOOCs
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MOOCs and Open Education Around the World

MOOCs and Open Education Around the World | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Bonk, C. J., Lee. M. M., Reeves, T. C., & Reynolds, T. H. (2015). Preface: Actions leading to “MOOCs and Open Education Around the World.” In Bonk, Lee., Reeves, & Reynolds, T. H. (Eds.), MOOCs & Open Ed Around the World. Routledge

Via Peter Mellow
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Keeping up with Ed Tech
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8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome

8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The 8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome Infographic presents the usefulness of badges as indicators of skills learned inside or outside the classroom.

Via EDTC@UTB, WebTeachers
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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, May 22, 9:19 AM

Thinking through the badge idea in Professional Learning...

Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, May 22, 3:00 PM

Badges are the new trophies, are you using them?

David Bell's curator insight, May 22, 4:15 PM

This infographic is an great way to share the Open Badge concept with those who don't yet know about it.

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Presentations in Education
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10 Tips for Building a Strong Story

Need to improve your storytelling? Here are 10 tips to help your presentation.

Via Baiba Svenca
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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, Today, 3:55 AM

This can serve as a guide to students who are learning how to build a presentation that has a strong backbone and impressive muscle.

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Want to Gain Expertise in Instructional Design? 4 Things You Need to Learn – An Infographic

Want to Gain Expertise in Instructional Design? 4 Things You Need to Learn – An Infographic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Every Instructional designer needs to have good knowledge of standard instructional design models like ADDIE or Gagne’s nine events. These models facilitate the development of learner centric eLearning courses. But, it is not easy to remember all these concepts and apply them at the right instant of time to develop a successful eLearning course.

So, how can you overcome this problem?

Well, you need to concentrate on four things which will remind you of the ideas behind these principles and help you make good online courses.
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Learning Technology News
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How flipped learning works in (and out of) the classroom

How flipped learning works in (and out of) the classroom | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Flipped learning is more than just having students do homework during the school day. It’s more than just putting the onus on students to teach themselves. In fact, it’s neither of those things. Don’t be fooled by simple explanations of flipped classrooms that simplify a highly complex undertaking.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, Today, 1:51 AM

A good but quite basic introduction to flipped learning.

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Moodle and Web 2.0
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6 Tips To Engage Passive Learners In eLearning

6 Tips To Engage Passive Learners In eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

When it comes right down to it, there are two distinct types of learners. On the one hand, there are those learners who seize every opportunity to soak up knowledge and use this knowledge to improve their lives in some way. They actively attend every eLearning event, online presentation and assessment, because they are well aware of the fact that, by this way, they can expand their professional or personal skills.

On the other hand, there are passive learners. Although these individuals acquire the information, they don’t eager to apply it in the world outside the virtual classroom. They might pass every assessment with flying colors and complete every eLearning activity, but they aren’t planning on changing behaviors or using their newly found knowledge to improve any aspect of their lives.

So, is it possible to design eLearning deliverables that engage passive learners in eLearning and help them to achieve all of the benefits that the eLearning experience can offer? Of course it is.


Via EDTC@UTB, Alazne González, Juergen Wagner
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On the Horizon: A Magnetic Zap that Strengthens Memory

On the Horizon: A Magnetic Zap that Strengthens Memory | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
To see if participants' associative memory improved, one day after the stimulation regimen finished they were tested for their ability to learn random words paired with faces. Subjects who had had TMS performed 33 percent better, compared with those who received placebo treatments, such as sham stimulation.

“Twenty-four hours may not sound like a long time, but in fact that's quite long in terms of affecting the brain,” Voss says. His team followed up with the participants about 15 days later and found the benefit remained, according to another paper in press at Hippocampus. The team also imaged the subjects' brains one and 15 days after stimulation, finding increases in neural connectivity in their associative memory network.

Voss now plans to test whether this method works on individuals who have disorders in which the memory association network is weak, such as Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia.
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EU Skills Panorama - European Commission - Analytical Highlights | eSkills

EU Skills Panorama - European Commission - Analytical Highlights | eSkills | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The EU Skills Panorama integrates in one single database information on skills needs and mismatches from several different national, European and international sources

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 23, 11:17 AM

The EU Skills Panorama integrates in one single database information on skills needs and mismatches from several different national, European and international sources


Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from New Web 2.0 tools for education
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The 2015 Honor Roll: EdTech’s Must-Read K–12 IT Blogs

The 2015 Honor Roll: EdTech’s Must-Read K–12 IT Blogs | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
We've scoured the web and found 50 essential blogs for you.

Via Kathleen Cercone
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Google Tests First Error Correction in Quantum Computing

Google Tests First Error Correction in Quantum Computing | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Quantum computers won’t ever outperform today’s classical computers unless they can correct for errors that disrupt the fragile quantum states of their qubits. A team at Google has taken the next huge step toward making quantum computing practical by demonstrating the first system capable of correcting such errors.

 

Google’s breakthrough originated with the hiring of a quantum computing research group from the University California, Santa Barbara in the autumn of 2014. The UCSB researchers had previously built a system of superconducting quantum circuits that performed with enough accuracy tomake error correction a possibility. That earlier achievement paved the way for the researchers—many now employed at Google—to build a system that can correct the errors that naturally arise during quantum computing operations. Their work is detailed in the 4 March 2015 issue of the journal Nature.

 

“This is the first time natural errors arising from the qubit environment were corrected,” said Rami Barends, a quantum electronics engineer at Google. “It’s the first device that can correct its own errors.”

 

Quantum computers have the potential to perform many simultaneous calculations by relying upon quantum bits, or qubits, that can represent information as both 1 and 0 at the same time. That gives quantum computing a big edge over today’s classical computers that rely on bits that can only represent either 1 or 0.

 

But a huge challenge in building practical quantum computers involves preserving the fragile quantum states of qubits long enough to run calculations. The solution that Google and UCSB have demonstrated is a quantum error-correction code that uses simple classical processing to correct the errors that arise during quantum computing operations.

 

Such codes can’t directly detect errors in qubits without disrupting the fragile quantum states. But they get around that problem by relying on entanglement, a physics phenomenon that enables a single qubit to share its information with many other qubits through a quantum connection. The codes exploit entanglement with an architecture that includes “measurement” qubits entangled with neighboring “data” qubits.

 

The Google and UCSB team has been developing a specific quantum error-correction code called “surface code.” They eventually hope to build a 2-D surface code architecture based on a checkerboard arrangement of qubits, so that “white squares” would represent the data qubits that perform operations and “black squares” would represent measurement qubits that can detect errors in neighboring qubits.

 

For now, the researchers have been testing the surface code in a simplified “repetition code” architecture that involves a linear, 1-D array of qubits. Their unprecedented demonstration of error correction used a repetition code architecture that included nine qubits. They tested the repetition code through the equivalent of 90,000 test runs to gather the necessary statistics about its performance.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, May 23, 2:25 AM

Quantum computers have the potential to perform many simultaneous calculations by relying upon quantum bits, or qubits, that can represent information as both 1 and 0 at the same time. That gives quantum computing a big edge over today’s classical computers that rely on bits that can only represent either 1 or 0.


But a huge challenge in building practical quantum computers involves preserving the fragile quantum states of qubits long enough to run calculations. The solution that Google and UCSB have demonstrated is a quantum error-correction code that uses simple classical processing to correct the errors that arise during quantum computing operations.

Pablo Vicente Munuera's curator insight, May 23, 4:05 AM

Quantum computers are coming... :D

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5 core functions of the LMS of the future

In multiple conversations conducted with over 70 educators, campus-based technologists, and developers from the private sector, EDUCAUSE—enlisted by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation—identified five domains of core functionality for the NGDLE:

1. Interoperability and Integration: The ability to integrate tools and exchange content and learning data. “This is the linchpin of the NGDLE,” emphasizes the report.


2. Personalization: Outfitting and configuration of the learning environments, which is then used to construct pathways to accomplish learning tasks and attain learning goals; this needs to occur not only at the individual level, but also at the departmental, divisional, institutional, and consortium levels.


3. Analytics, Advising, and Learning Assessment: Learning analytics should be incorporated to measure, collect, analyze, and report data about learners and their contexts for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs. Integrated planning and advising systems (IPAS) is an “institutional capability to create shared ownership for educational progress by providing students, faculty, and staff with holistic information and services that contribute to the completion of a degree or other credential,” defined the report.


4. Collaboration: The NGDLE must support collaboration at multiple levels and make it easy to move between private and public digital spaces. The NGDLE must also include a requirement to move past a “walled garden” approach to locking down a course’s LMS, and instead enable a learning community to make choices about what parts are public and what parts are private.

 

5. Accessibility and Universal Design: “A holistic, ground-up approach, addressing accessibility within the larger framework of universal design, has the potential to provide the most accessible digital learning environment possible,” states the report. NGDLE designers must consider accessibility in terms of the students as both receiver and creator of content.

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Microlearning Instructional Design: Less Is More | InfoPro Learning

Microlearning Instructional Design: Less Is More | InfoPro Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Many instructional design professionals that I have consulted with here at InfoPro Learning are still shackled to the idea that formal training should last hours at a time, and should be instructor-led. Oftentimes it is not the instructional designers themselves who have a preference towards formal training technique – it is their executive sponsors, the C-suite at their companies, who think of training as an afterthought and expect corporate training to resemble their experiences in higher education. However, as corporate learning and talent management continues to mature as a business discipline, our assumptions about how best to deliver training to employees are being challenged.

Enter: Microlearning
Microlearning is an exciting methodology that learning professionals should consider adding to their training portfolios. Microlearning content comprises short instructional videos that focus on specific topics, and ideally, these videos can be accessed by learners just-in-time so they can be leveraged as performance support tools rather than formal training tools. Microlearning is not meant to replace formal training content, but it can supplement formal training, and it can serve to bolster employee performance on-the-job, at the moment of need. Instructional designers should treat microlearning with a “less is more” mentality, and resist making the content too long or putting in too much information.
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Using C.R.A.P Web Design For eLearning

Using C.R.A.P Web Design For eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What does C.R.A.P mean?

C.R.A.P stands for contrast, repetition, alignment and proximity and these are the four principles of design that graphic and visual designers use all the time for websites. Let’s dive straight in and get familiar with how you can apply these principles to elearning.
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The Online Learning Teaching Techniques - eLearning Industry

The Online Learning Teaching Techniques - eLearning Industry | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Why the traditional learning theories do not work

The traditional learning theory of ‘sage on the stage’, also known as passive transmittal learning, emphasizes the teacher as the center of the learning process. It places the responsibility of learning on the transfer of knowledge from the expert (teacher) to the novice (student). Education rooted in the teacher-center approach often uses direct instruction techniques, such as lecture while the students sit and take notes. Given the fundamental design of online learning, namely that the teacher and student are not physically present, there must be a change from this learning paradigm so that each student can be successful in this learning environment.

A student-center approach to learning is often referred to as the teacher being ‘the guide on the side’. While this can be straightforward to imagine in the face-to-face classroom, it is harder to conceptualize in the virtual setting. Teachers in online learning cannot float around the classroom, observing student work, watching student processes, standing ready to offer guidance when errors or misconceptions arise. While this approach places more responsibility on the student, the teacher still sets up the active learning activities and shares in the responsibility. Therefore, even this approach needs to be modified for successful learning to occur in the virtual setting.
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Games vs Game-based Learning vs Gamification | The Upside Learning Blog

Games vs Game-based Learning vs Gamification | The Upside Learning Blog | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The simplest definition of games would be ‘activities in which participants take part for enjoyment, learning or competition’. The chief advantage of games in learning is the drive and engagement they create, and the fun-factor they bring in, that makes a boring task interesting. So, does that mean all games are a part of learning? Probably not. But, games can be designed in a way to deliver learning content, which essentially is Game-based learning.

Confused? Let’s break it down into simpler terms using an example.
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