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EduGeek Journal » Open Learning Structure Part 1

EduGeek Journal » Open Learning Structure Part 1 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Open learning is becoming the new social learning – a “well-used” term that may quickly become a cliche if too many companies keep over-using it to hype their agenda. MOOCs are all the rage now, but sometimes you get the sense that few people really get what is going on. I have been following MOOCs from the beginning and I still don’t get what is going on fully – so I kind of sit back and wonder who all these “experts” are that different companies pull out to support their newest money making venture. Funny how money can suddenly drum up a whole slew of experts ex nihilo…

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But, reservations aside about who might hijack the idea, open learning still has a grand hint of promise that just can’t be denied. Jim Groom has a great post about the architecture and structure needed to run open courses. This brought me back to the time when “social learning” was still a new, interesting concept and Harriet and I came up with the Social Learning Manifesto. The basic idea of the diagram that we put out there is still a good illustration of what is happening in education, so I thought I would pull that out, dust it off, update it a bit, and use it as a good starting point to show a bird’s eye view of what is needed. So, instead of a Social Learning Network, I bring you…

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Best of 2014: Teaching Channel's Top 20

Best of 2014: Teaching Channel's Top 20 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
It’s time for Teaching Channel’s year-in-review -- and what a year it’s been! We took a look at what you watched and read and collected the best right here.

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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The Heart of the Matter: Why I Teach

The Heart of the Matter: Why I Teach | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What are the reasons you teach? Who are the students who inspire you? What led you to teaching and what has made you stay?
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Is Twitter the Best Option for Online Professional Development?

Is Twitter the Best Option for Online Professional Development? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
In recent years Twitter has become a very popular tool for educators, with some calling the social media platform "The Best Professional Development Tool for Teachers” and some claiming that educators “dominate” Twitter. (The math doesn’t really work out on the last claim. By Twitter’s own calculations, less than 1% of tweets are education-related.)
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New collection of platforms are overturning how we approach and value online learning

New collection of platforms are overturning how we approach and value online learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The online learning landscape has long been dominated by Blackboard, Pearson, and other large corporate platforms, which have provided virtual classrooms, hosted online course content, and supported discussion features for various on- and off-line colleges and universities. In the past several years, however, many new platforms — some reinventing the traditional pay model, and others providing free content — have arrived on the scene, taking root in their own right and changing the face of web-based education.
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How Teens Are Really Using Social Media | Edudemic

How Teens Are Really Using Social Media | Edudemic | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

A lot of kids are using social media these days, and even if that isn’t surprising to you, it may be surprising to you just how many of them are using it and just how much. Leveraging these popular social media tools in the classroom is a no-brainer: everything from Twitter and Facebook all the way to Instagram have found their way into lesson plans across the globe. Whether you’re using all of the social media sites, some of them, or none of them at all, chances are that your students are using them.

The handy infographic takes a look at the social media use of teens and tweens: What platforms are they using and how much? What is appropriate for them? How can you monitor their use and ensure their safety? Keep reading to learn more

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MOOCs are closed platforms… and probably doomed

MOOCs are closed platforms… and probably doomed | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There is nothing wrong with closed platforms per se. The ancient Greek philosophers made a living by selling their lectures to paying customers. But most modern college campuses are remarkably open in contrast. In all likelihood, I can just show up for class on campus in most colleges in North America and attend lectures, for free. I do not need to provide an email address or a password. If there is room in the class, I can generally sneak in. Nobody will care. Why is that? Because we have learned that selling lectures is a tough business. It was different for the Greeks because so little was written down… but we live in an era where Amazon can deliver a textbook on any topic directly to your door within 48 hours. In this era, it is much better to sell diplomas and degrees. Unlike lectures, they have tangible financial value for the students. Some colleges also serve as meeting places, others provide an experience.

What colleges do not do, at least on campus, is to make money off course content. As it is, you can easily order all the textbooks you could possibly read on Amazon. You can join discussion groups about them. You sneak into lectures, or find tons of them online. There is simply little value in the course content.

Do not believe me? Run the following experiment. Make all courses tuition free. Students can enrol for free and if they pass the exam, they get the credit. However, they must pay $20 for each hour of lecture they choose to attend. You know what is going to happen? Nobody but the instructor will show up. How do I know? Because, as it is, with free lectures once you have enrolled in a class, most students never show up for class unless they are compelled to do so. Why would anyone think that it is going to be somehow different with pre-recorded lectures online? You know, the lectures colleges like so much? The truth is that there is only value at the margin for course content.

It is probably harder to make a living selling lectures than it is as a journalist, and it has become nearly impossible to live off journalism. The volume of great free stuff is just too high.

Colleges that try to lock down course content, let alone the content of their MOOCs, are signalling that they have no clue about the business that they are in.
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Analytics and Student Success Innovations in Higher Education

Diverse higher education institutions—from community colleges to private four-year colleges to large universities—are beginning to use advanced analytics to inform and power their student-success innovations. Come join this interactive dialogue to learn more about how exemplar institutions are approaching gaining deeper insights about what's working, what's not, and for whom; and deploying analytically fueled apps to the front lines to help more striving students learn well and finish strong.

 

Jim Lerman's insight: Excellent conversation


Via Jim Lerman
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Anyone Still Listening? Educators Consider Killing the Lecture

Anyone Still Listening? Educators Consider Killing the Lecture | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Though some teachers are still adamantly holding onto traditional formal lectures, many others are considering whether this is an ineffective and outdated model that no longer works in the information age.

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Peer instruction was first introduced by Eric Mazur, the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard University and Area Dean of Applied Physics, to his classes in 1991. Mazur, who found that this method helped students understand better, said lectures are much like musical concerts — they can still be appreciated, especially as a motivational tool. But what’s changed is that the lecture is no longer the only way to transfer important information. “Ever since the Middle Ages, the primary vehicle for conveying information was the lecture,” he said. “But this is the 21st century, and there are so many ways to convey information, it’s not the necessity it once was.” Students don’t learn by listening, they learn by doing, and Mazur points out that the brain’s “hard work” of learning has to be performed by the learner, not the lecture.


Via Dr Peter Carey
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Learning - How it Works & How to Do it Better

Learning - How it Works & How to Do it Better | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Full Article: http://trainugly.com/portfolio/learning/ Our brains our designed to learn the best when we're operating at the edge of our abilities, stretched...

Via Beth Dichter, Helen Teague
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 21, 8:49 PM

Learn why it is important to stretch your brain, to try new things (and to fail) and to continue to try and improve. Learn about our "Lizard Brain"  (also known as the amygdala),an important component of our brain that impacts how we learn, but the learning is related to the time when humans hunted in the wild. This part of the brain holds us back in many ways, and although it once protected us now it tends to hold us back.

What can we do about this? The video explores this and discusses some of the ways we can "dance" with this "Lizard Brain" and move from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. For more information take the time to watch this video.

miracletrain 夢想驛站's curator insight, December 22, 6:00 AM
Learning sweet spots!!!
Helen Teague's curator insight, December 23, 9:28 AM

especially good at about 6 minutes in...  see also the trainugly.com website

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Over 800 E-learning Examples to Inspire Your Course Design

Over 800 E-learning Examples to Inspire Your Course Design | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One of the best ways to learn is by looking at the work others have done. We can see different ideas in action which causes us to think about how they were built and explore what we might do different with the same content.
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Strength in numbers ~ Stephen's Web

Strength in numbers ~ Stephen's Web | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
So what's the link between Pearson and the PISA assessments? I don't know either, but after reading this odd post I begin to suspect there is one. Why is it odd? Well, first, it conflates the emergence of the World Wide Web with a political campaign, saying (erroneously) that they both "show the power of a shared ambition and a collective approach." The web is exactly the opposite of a "collective" approach; each site is developed independently, the only links between them being, well, links. So why this odd definition of "collective"? Because the author thinks it applies to PISA as well. "Every three years around 70 countries volunteer to take part in PISA, which looks at the skills and knowledge of 15 year olds." Well, yes, but they don't represent any sort of collective effort (otherwise we'd see Americans involved in the testing of Chinese students, and vice versa). And the respective countries don't share common goals. It's unlikely even that they share the definition of "skills and knowledge" imposed on them by PISA (because otherwise national curricula would reflect these same topics, which they do not). Since I presume that the author knows better than to make such facile comparisons, I conclude they are deliberate, which makes me suspect something is up.
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Learning’s first principle – the most important thing i learned this year

Learning’s first principle – the most important thing i learned this year | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
I have spent most of my year straddled between different ideas of what it means to learn. I’ve worked with k-12 educators, with the province here in PEI, with science educators and crazy postmodern theorists. I want to talk about a thread that I’m seeing through all of my work at the moment. I see it in the (M)OOC work I’ve done for years, I’ve seen it in the ‘transition to university’ stuff I’ve been doing since 2007, and I hear it from educators chatting in bars, over christmas cakes, and at conferences. I’ve come to think of it as the ‘first principle’.
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15 Photography Sites to Boost Your Skills - Lifehack

15 Photography Sites to Boost Your Skills - Lifehack | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Are you tired of taking taking trashy photos? Have you been trying so hard to capture images like a pro just by using your own digital camera? Do you want to learn appropriate photo angles and take the most beautiful shots with your digital camera or your new GoPro? Well, it’s possible!

Taking photos like a professional is one of the most trending hobbies around. Now-a-days, “selfies” and “groufies” are all the rage on social media sites. People want to share their day-to-day experiences with the world. We can share our most memorable events with a simple click of a button. It is so easy to upload your photos online. It’s fun to show off our personal photos, especially beautiful places with the best scenic views.

Because of this ease to share such beauty, photography is one of the most joyful hobbies anyone can do in their lifetime. By sharing photos we also share precious memories. That’s why people want to take the best photos they can. We all want our photos to look professional. Well, now-a-days this is easier than you may think.

Via John Evans
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The Pigeons of Ed-Tech

“Edward L. Thorndike won and John Dewey lost.”– Ellen Condliffe Lagemann

As part of his graduate work, B. F. Skinner invented what’s now known as “the Skinner Box.” His “operant conditioning chamber” was used to study and to train animals to perform certain tasks. Do the task correctly; get a reward (namely food).

Skinner was hardly the first to use animals in psychological experiments that sought to understand how the learning process works. Several decades earlier, for his dissertation research, Edward Thorndike had built a “puzzle box” in which an animal had to push a lever in order to open a door and escape (again, often rewarded with food for successfully completing the “puzzle”). Thorndike measured how quickly animals figured out how to get out of the box after being placed in it again and again and again – their “learning curve.”
Pigeons and Puzzle Boxes

We have in the puzzle box and in the Skinner Box the origins of education technology – some of the very earliest “teaching machines” – just as we have in the work of Thorndike and Skinner, the foundations of educational psychology and, as Lagemann has argued, of many of our educational practices still today. (In addition to developing the puzzle box, Thorndike also developed prototypes for what we know now as the multiple choice test.)

“Once we have arranged the particular type of consequence called a reinforcement,“ Skinner wrote in ”The Science of Learning and the Art of Teaching“ (1954), ”our techniques permit us to shape the behavior of an organism almost at will. It has become a routine exercise to demonstrate this in classes in elementary psychology by conditioning such an organism as a pigeon.”
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Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2014

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2014 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
1. Buzzwords

2. The Business of Ed-tech

3. School and "Skills"

4. MOOCS, Outsourcing, and Online Education

5. Competencies and Certificates

6. The Common Core State Standards

7. Data and Privacy

8. The Indie Web

9. Social Justice

10. #Fail
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The 2014 Best and Worst in Higher Education

The 2014 Best and Worst in Higher Education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Free speech. College affordability. The value of a degree. Student athletes behaving badly. The seemingly dismal track record of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Administrative mishandling allegations of sexual assault.

It was an up and down year for higher education, as each of these matters took a turn atop the 24-hour news cycle. While I am not particularly nostalgic, I'd like to review some of the highlights -- and lowlights -- of 2014:
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The lesson you never got taught in school: How to learn! | Big Think

The lesson you never got taught in school: How to learn! | Big Think | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A paper published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest has evaluated ten techniques for improving learning, ranging from mnemonics to highlighting and came to some surprising conclusions.
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6 Design Principles Of Connected Learning

6 Design Principles Of Connected Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
TEST The Learning And Design Principles Of Connected Learning
by Terry Heick
In 2015, no one should be hurting for compelling ed content.
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Why Talking About the Brain Can Empower Learners

Why Talking About the Brain Can Empower Learners | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Knowledge about how the brain works can make a big difference when confronting difficult learning situations. If you have a growth mindset and are aware of the ability to improve oneself, a challenge can be welcome (versus those with a fixed mindset who are averse to the failures a challenge may bring). Stanford University professor of psychology Carol Dweck, who has been leading the research in this field, discusses “The power of believing that you can improve” in this TED talk. In one example, she talks about students who made vast improvements on test scores once they learned about the growth mindset:

 

“This happened because the meaning of effort and difficulty were transformed. Before, effort and difficulty made them feel dumb, made them feel like giving up, but now, effort and difficulty, that’s when their neurons are making new connections, stronger connections. That’s when they’re getting smarter.”


Via John Evans
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The Skills That Will Get You Hired In 2015

The Skills That Will Get You Hired In 2015 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
It should come as no surprise that a college degree alone is no longer the golden ticket to a good career that it once was. It certainly helps, but the letters on your diploma are no longer a guarantee of a good job. In fact, employers are looking more at valuable soft skills, like teamwork and communication skills, when making hiring decisions.What employers want.The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) recently released the results of a survey, in which they asked hiring manag

Via Dr Peter Carey
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What Students Do (And Don't Do) In Khan Academy ~ Dan Meyer

What Students Do (And Don't Do) In Khan Academy ~ Dan Meyer | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

by Dan Meyer

 

"Khan Academy claims alignment with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) but an analysis of their eighth-grade year indicates that alignment is loose. 40% of Khan Academy exercises assessed the acts of calculating and solving whereas the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium’s assessment of the CCSS emphasized those acts in only 25% of their released items. 74% of Khan Academy’s exercises resulted in the production of either a number or a multiple-choice response, whereas those outputs accounted for only 25% of the SBAC assessment.

Introduction

"My dissertation will examine the opportunities students have to learn math online. In order to say something about the current state of the art, I decided to complete Khan Academy’s eighth grade year and ask myself two specific questions about every exercise:"


Via Jim Lerman
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How To Build One Brain-Boosting Habit In 2015

How To Build One Brain-Boosting Habit In 2015 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

We never stop learning. But unlike our school days, when our brain is constantly challenged and exercised to become better, our adult lives don't make time for this. In 2015, give your brain a boost. It's easier than you think and takes only a few minutes of your life each day


Via Nik Peachey
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tom cockburn's curator insight, December 24, 6:08 AM
Worth a try
Johan van der Merwe's curator insight, December 25, 12:41 PM

Might be useful for reading

 

Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, December 26, 9:53 PM

Some great habits to pick in the new year. 

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Photos For Class - The World's Easiest Way to Download Properly Attributed, Creative Common Images

Photos For Class - The World's Easiest Way to Download Properly Attributed, Creative Common Images | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Are you looking for a safe and easy way to find images for school reports? Just search and download properly attributed, copyright free images.

G Rated Images - Photos for Class uses Flickr safe search, and we do a little filtering of our own to help it out - Read More
Easy Attribution - When you click download, Photos For Class automatically cites the author and the image license terms - Read More
Creative Common Images - All images shown are to the best of our (and Flickr's) knowledge Creative Commons licensed for school use

Via Dennis T OConnor, Sharon Murdoch, Juergen Wagner
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Luciana Viter's comment, November 26, 5:29 AM
Extremely useful! Thanks for sharing!
Luciana Viter's comment, November 26, 5:29 AM
Extremely useful! Thanks for sharing!
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Questions Before Answers: What Drives a Great Lesson?

Questions Before Answers: What Drives a Great Lesson? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Lessons, units, and topics are more motivating when they begin with a question whose answer students want to know. Not only do great questions generate interest, they also answer the question that so many students wonder about: "Why do I have to learn this?" Finally, great questions increase cognitive organization of the content by framing it into a meaningful answer to the opening question.
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8 Gamification of Learning Mistakes You Need to Avoid

8 Gamification of Learning Mistakes You Need to Avoid | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Here are eight mistakes that have been made in gamification implementations. Learn what to do—and what not to do—when you implement your own gamified learning solution. 
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