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The Tin Can, Can | Learnstreaming

The Tin Can, Can | Learnstreaming | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

I think of Tin Can as “streaming what you’re learning” or learnstreaming.

 

Whatever learning framework you follow (e.g.,70/20/10), it’s clear than most learning takes place on the job and not through a course. If you’re someone who is connected online during your workday, you’re probably connecting with people (nouns), performing actions (verbs) to create things (objects).

 

It sounds like Tin Can fits with how the web has changed from pages to streams and listens to activity streams to capture data.

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Educational Technology News
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The pros and cons of getting a degree online

The pros and cons of getting a degree online | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Despite significant coverage of online education in recent years, finding a balanced perspective can be remarkably difficult since conversations tend to be highly partisan. Online schooling is either presented as the inevitable and awesome educational wave of the future or talked about as a cheap facsimile of the traditional classroom experience.

 

For potential students trying to make a decision about their own educational journeys, this can be confusing and even distressing. You certainly don’t want to choose the wrong path for yourself, so how can you know if an online degree program is the right option for you?


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Take Action: Verbs That Define Bloom’s Taxonomy

Take Action: Verbs That Define Bloom’s Taxonomy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
A neat visualization of the verbs associated with Bloom's Taxonomy.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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Instructional Design Models And Theories: The Cognitive Flexibility Theory

Instructional Design Models And Theories: The Cognitive Flexibility Theory | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The Cognitive Flexibility Theory, introduced by Spiro, Feltovich, and Coulson in 1988, is about how learning takes place in “complex” and “ill-structured domains”. In essence, it’s a theory that strives to determine how the human mind can obtain and manage knowledge and how it restructures our existing knowledge base, based on the new information received. Research on the Cognitive Flexibility Theory has sought scientific evidence with respect to how knowledge is represented within the learner's mind, as well as which internal processes take place according to the mental representations we receive. In this article, I’ll briefly explain basic principles of the Cognitive Flexibility Theory and I’ll give you some ideas about its practical applications in the eLearning course design.


Via Yashy Tohsaku, Rui Guimarães Lima, Jocelyn Stoller
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The Future of Online Testing with MOOCs: An Exploratory Analysis of Current Practice

The Future of Online Testing with MOOCs: An Exploratory Analysis of Current Practice Eamon Costello (National Institute for Digital Learning, Dublin City University


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Kathy Dawson Shields's curator insight, May 31, 8:54 AM

Scalable assessments with unlimited numbers of students

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Digital game-based learning levels up digital literacies

Digital game-based learning levels up digital literacies | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Digital literacies and digital game-based learning (DGBL) are both concepts that have emerged in the educational arena since digital technologies have become all pervasive in every aspect of society. With mobile technologies continuing to develop, games are being used more and more by people of all generations and schools are realising that there is some potential for adopting digital games into the formal setting for learning (Beavis, 2012; Arnab et al., 2012). Digital literacies have been recognised as necessary for successful participation in all aspects of life and are embedded throughout the Australian Curriculum / NSW Syllabuses for the Australian Curriculum within the General Capabilities and Cross-curriculum priorities. There are many similarities between digital literacies and digital game-based learning, yet, it would seem that very little research has been undertaken to make the link obvious between these two concepts.

Throughout this chapter, connections will be made between digital game-based learning and digital literacies to show that digital game-based learning is a powerful pedagogy that incorporates the elements of digital literacies. In showing the similarities, it will be seen that through the adoption of game-based learning, digital literacies can be taught in context. Digital literacies are the skills that connect the learning content (curriculum) and digital games are the platform that these digital literacies can be practised within a meaningful context.
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From Superhero Teacher to Bad Teacher: Hollywood Films Then and Now (Part 1)

From Superhero Teacher to Bad Teacher: Hollywood Films Then and Now (Part 1) | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Two weeks ago, I was one of the examiners of a doctoral student’s dissertation. After becoming emeritus professor, I have avoided such tasks but this student’s work captured my attention because it helped unravel a puzzle that had bugged me for the decades in which I had seen Hollywood films about teaching and schools. Like Derisa Grant, the doctoral student whose dissertation I read–she passed the oral examination–I had noticed that Hollywood’s portrayal of teachers had changed over the years. Think Dead Poets Society (1989). Think Stand and Deliver (1988). Now think Half Nelson (2006) and Bad Teacher (2011). By actually counting the Hollywood films made in the 1980s and 1990s and those in the past decade and how they depicted teachers as positive or negative characters, Grant made the point that there was a change in film portrayals of teachers.

 

From private school teacher John Keating (fictional) to high school math teacher Jaime Escalante (actual person),  superhero film-teachers in earlier decades bent the minds of their students making a profound difference in their students’ lives. Neither Harlem middle school English teacher, Dan Dunne (fictional) nor Elizabeth Halsey (fictional) middle school teacher near Chicago, however, were movie superheroes; they were deeply flawed characters who entered teaching with mixed motives and whose behaviors were closer to immoral than any superhero teacher’s motives and behavior. Why the shift in Hollywood portrayals of teachers?

 

 

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Rethinking education

Rethinking education | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
I currently have the privilege of participating in and contributing to a variety of working groups and reference groups that are concerned with the future of education, each addressing various aspects the traditional education system, including the future of assessment, the development of modern learning environments, the impact of technology etc.

A central premise of much of this work focuses on just how well education is managing to keep up with the pace and scale of the rapid change that is experienced in the world in general, and how effectively we are equipping young people for life in a constantly evolving work environment. This is the question explored by Maha Barada in the latest edition of Learning World who presents three stories exploring this theme from different angles and in different locations.
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Providing audio feedback to students: Review of a review | Virtual Canuck

I’ve always been interested in studies that help us differentiate both pedagogies and educational technology use, based upon time requirements. These studies of course should include all the actors – too often student time is taken as a free given.

Thus, a recent publication by Gusman Edouard tweaked my interest.

Edouard, G. (2015). Effectiveness of audio feedback in distance education. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY, 45 http://itdl.org/Journal/Apr_15/Apr15.pdf#page=49

I should note, right away, that I am a big fan of audio feedback and have been more or less exclusively using audio to mark graduate students essays for the past 5 years. I get very positive feedback from students and I am sure the feedback I give is much more extensive than that produced when I use using text comments or summary assessment of their work. Finally, I am convinced that it also saves me time, as I not a very fast typist.

The article asserts that “the proponents of audio feedback claim that it is superior to written comments in many ways.” They then take a critical look at this claim. The key questions in this paper are:

Is there enough research to support the claim?
Does audio feedback improve learning?
Can it help to save time?

The article provides no original data but does cover some of the research that I am familiar with on this type of technology use. Also note that the aim seems to have a critical edge, asking if there really is evidence to support claims about audio feedback in distance education. As you will see, I think this attempt to be critical underlies quite sloppy research.
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5 Advantages of Game-based E-learning Courses

5 Advantages of Game-based E-learning Courses | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Learner engagement is vital to the success of an eLearning course. Involving your learners in online training courses using different activities like games goes a long way in making the courses learner-friendly and engaging.

Gamification is the process of including game-based mechanics in non-gaming contexts such as education, work and training etc. The main idea of creating/ using gamification in eLearning courses is to create an interactive and competitive environment which facilitates better comprehension of the subject-matter and retention of knowledge.
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Technology Is Making Us Socially Awkward

Technology Is Making Us Socially Awkward | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Sure, emoji are great at conveying how we feel. But are we getting worse at expressing ourselves with face-to-face communication? (Animation: Erik Mace for Yahoo Health)

I am what society has labeled “a Millennial.” Looking back at my life so far, there is a pretty clear divide: Life before tech, and life after tech.

Life before tech: Spend majority of waking hours incessantly talking to my friends IRL (during basketball games, hanging out at home, during lunch, etc.).

Life after tech: Spend majority of waking hours on my Macbook or smartphone, incessantly texting or emailing my friends in between stories and blog-surfing. 

Life before tech: Finally learn how to interact with cute guys by the end of middle school. (Sweet success.)

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Cathy Jo Fisher's curator insight, May 30, 5:34 PM

Minding my digital practices seems wise

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Formative Assessments in E-Learning | Origin Learning

Formative Assessments in E-Learning | Origin Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

E-learning takes the formative assessment process a step further. Because of the ability to add multimedia elements like audio, animations, video and graphics, assessments can be made a lot more engaging while appealing to the different learning styles. Instructional designers can embed assessment in instruction and accordingly steer the course to bridge the gaps between the desired outcome and what learners already know. As opposed to summative assessment where learners will only be evaluated from a pool of questions in the form of a test, formative assessments can be used to keep e-learners engaged throughout the course by regularly testing various parameters by various methods on a continuous basis.


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Do Your Kids Need to Learn to Code? YES! But Not for the Reasons You Think

Do Your Kids Need to Learn to Code? YES! But Not for the Reasons You Think | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

"So, exactly why do kids need to learn to code? Grant Hosford, CEO at codeSpark, shares his personal and profession stories of why."

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The more research I did, the more computer science looked like the perfect gateway to 21st century skills. The logical problem solving and algorithmic thinking at the core of computer science force kids to think about thinking – a process referred to as meta-cognition that has proven benefits related to self-monitoring and independent learning.

 

But aren’t there many other ways to teach concepts like creative problem solving beyond computer science and programming? Yes, absolutely. However, as I’ve come to appreciate deeply, the study of computer science elegantly teaches ALL of the concepts I’ve outlined above and has the huge added benefit of transforming children from consumers of technology to creators of technology. This means that no matter what a child’s core skills are, an understanding of computer science allows them to leverage those skills beyond what they could achieve on their own.


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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Tools for Teachers & Learners
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ITNedu - The leading source of educational video content

ITNedu - The leading source of educational video content | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Incredible video from real world events designed to engage learners, whether making a ‘dry’ subject fun, or helping students to relate their studies to real life situations.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, Today, 2:32 PM

This looks like a great resource for educational video. Register now and get updates.

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The Future of Online Testing with MOOCs

The Future of Online Testing with MOOCs: An Exploratory Analysis of Current Practice Eamon Costello (National Institute for Digital Learning, Dublin City University) Jane Holland (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) Mark Brown (National Institute for Digital Learning, Dublin City University)


Via Lucas Gruez
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If you want teachers to innovate, don't train them using a sage on a stage

If you want teachers to innovate, don't train them using a sage on a stage | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
It’s hard to be creative in the profession when training is limited to formal workshops. We need to learn more from eachother through social media debates

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Future of Education 2020 Summit

Future of Education 2020 Summit | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
At a Stanford education conference this morning, speakers made presentation after presentation without once involving the audience, not even asking for questions. For the first couple of hours ther...

Via Peter Mellow
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The Basics of Making Engaging Flipping Videos * Flipped Learning Network

The Basics of Making Engaging Flipping Videos * Flipped Learning Network | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The very basics of what to do when making educational videos for flipping a class. Many thanks to Jaclyn Pessel @chempessel, Meghan Klement @klemistry and Cara Johnson @AHSAnatomy for volunteering to be in this video!

Content Times:
0:12 Turn off your phone
0:36 Silence extraneous noises
1:00 Post a “Do Not Disturb” sign
1:26 Make sure you are actually recording
1:41 Look at the camera
2:08 Think about the video background
2:30 Remain stationary
2:52 Use big text
3:44 DON’T USE ALL CAPS!
3:55 Use drop shadow
4:20 Video length
4:53 Speak at a normal pace
5:22 Summary

Via Jim Lerman
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Why companies are moving to microlearning platforms for training ?

Why companies are moving to microlearning platforms for training ? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

... Demand is growing for MOOCs and alternative learning options online as companies recognize the alarming and ever-shifting skills gap. The four-year degree is no longer the only answer for a lifelong career — and possibly is not the answer for any relevant career for many graduates. Microlearning platforms help fill in the gaps for the estimated 50 percent of learners who are working adults in this country.

http://www.scoop.it/t/easy-mooc


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English Majors Can Be Doctors Too: Medical School Rethinks Pre-Med

English Majors Can Be Doctors Too: Medical School Rethinks Pre-Med | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
You can’t tell by looking which students at Mount Sinai’s school of medicine in New York City were traditional pre-meds as undergraduates and which weren’t. And that’s exactly the point.

Most of the class majored in biology or chemistry, crammed for the medical college admission test and got flawless grades and scores.

But a growing percentage came through a humanities-oriented program at Mount Sinai known as HuMed. As undergraduates, they majored in things like English or history or medieval studies. And though they got good grades, too, they didn’t take the MCAT, because Mount Sinai guaranteed them admission after their sophomore year of college.

Adding students who are steeped in more than just science to the medical school mix is a serious strategy at Mount Sinai.

Dr. David Muller is Mount Sinai’s dean for medical education. One wall of his cluttered office is a massive whiteboard covered with to-do tasks and memorable quotations. One quote reads: “Science is the foundation of an excellent medical education, but a well-rounded humanist is best suited to make the most of that education.”

The HuMed program dates back to 1987, when Dr. Nathan Kase, who was dean of medical education at the time, wanted to do something about what had become known as pre-med syndrome. Schools across the country were worried that the striving for a straight-A report card and high test scores was actually producing sub-par doctors. Applicants — and, consequently, medical students — were too single-minded.

Kase, according to Muller, “really had a firm belief that you couldn’t be a good doctor and a well-rounded doctor — relate to patients and communicate with them — unless you really had a good grounding in the liberal arts.”
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Another angle on the Human Brain Project

Another angle on the Human Brain Project | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
An important interview with the neuroscience laboratory manager from the Human Brain Project revealing some previously unknown details about the running of this important scientific endeavour.
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Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Moodle and Web 2.0
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10 Ideas For Upgrading Your Teaching This Summer

10 Ideas For Upgrading Your Teaching This Summer | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
10 Ideas For Upgrading Your Teaching This Summer

Via juandoming, Juergen Wagner
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Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, May 31, 2:02 PM

Another great way to learn during summer:  get a few teachers together and chose a book to read.  Create a blog to share insights.  This could help reinforce technology skills and allow more to participate as they sit at the pool or take care of children.  This might be something that could continue into the school year.

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Trends 2015 - Learning and Teaching in European Universities


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Paula King, Ph.D.'s curator insight, May 31, 7:57 PM

Saving this to read later.

Татьяна Фокина's curator insight, Today, 8:57 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Rescooped by Miloš Bajčetić from Digital Delights
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Open Door Classroom

It’s important to know what open educational resources are and how we might use them. But it’s just as important to pause and take stock — to think carefully about when and why we might have students working openly on the web. This presentation focuses on the ethical and pedagogical considerations in having students using open resources but also on learning in public, doing public work, and engaging with open learning communities.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Will New Technology Replace Jobs and Result in Greater Economic Freedom?

In the history of technology, emerging technologies are contemporary advances and innovation in various fields of technology. Various converging technologies ...

Via Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, May 30, 7:21 AM

A historical perspective on the promise and perils of technology in the workplace. 

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How to Get 40 Hours of Work Done in 16.7

How to Get 40 Hours of Work Done in 16.7 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
If you’re anything like I used to be, you work a lot – 60, 80, or even 100 hours a week. You let your work be a big part of how you define yourself. You wear those insane hours like a badge of honor, though in 100 years, or even next year, nobody will remember how many hours you worked this week, nor care.

So why do we do it? Looking back to when I worked like that, I realize I used my work to try and fill a void in myself. The problem was that this void was like a black hole. No matter how many hours I worked, it never seemed to fill it up. If anything, it made me feel worse.
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