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Personal Learning Environments and the revolution of Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development

Personal Learning Environments and the revolution of Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Developmental psychologist Lev Vygotsky defined what the person or a student can do — or the problems they can solve — as three different stages:

 

1. What a student can do on their own, working independently or without anyone’s help.

2. What the student can do with the help of someone.

3. What it is beyond the student’s reach even if helped by someone else.

 

He called the second stage the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) which had, as said, two limits: the lower limit, which was set by the maximum level of independent performance, and the upper limit, the maximum level of additional responsibility the student can accept with the assistance of an able instructor. But Vygotsky believed that learning shouldn’t follow development, but rather should lead it. A student should constantly be reaching slightly beyond their capabilities rather than working within them.

...

In other words, and summing up, I believe that it is likely that we see a decreasing need of instructors as more knowledgeable others in order to learn something, but an increasing need of instructors as more knowledgeable others in order to learn how to learn something. With Personal Learning Environments to cover the ground of one’s Zone of Personal Development, learning how to learn, how to design one’s own learning process may be more relevant than ever and require more help from third parties. This is, I think, the most promising future of teaching today.

 

 

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Ken Robinson: How to escape education's death valley | Video on TED.com

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.

 

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence

 

 

Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

“The real role of leadership in education … is not and should not be command and control. The real role of leadership is climate control, creating a climate of possibility.”

 

Great Talk!

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Tatiana Kuzmina's curator insight, September 7, 2013 2:58 PM

Worth watching..

Laurent Picard's curator insight, January 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Une vidéo trés intéressante (et amusante) où Ken Robinson parle du système éducatif américain. Mais ses propos s'appliquent aussi au notre...

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Carol Dweck: The Two Mindsets - Farnam Street

Carol Dweck: The Two Mindsets - Farnam Street | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Carol Dweck studies human motivation. She spends her days diving into why people succeed (or don’t) and what’s within our control to foster success.

As she describes it: “My work bridges developmental psychology, social psychology, and personality psychology, and examines the self-conceptions (or mindsets) people use to structure the self and guide their behavior. My research looks at the origins of these mindsets, their role in motivation and self-regulation, and their impact on achievement and interpersonal processes.”

Via John Evans
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Three Critical Conversations Started and Sustained by Flipped Learning

Three Critical Conversations Started and Sustained by Flipped Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The flipped learning model of instruction has begun to make the transition from an educational buzzword to a normative practice among many university instructors, and with good reason. Flipped learning provides many benefits for both faculty and students. However, instructors who use flipped learning soon find out that a significant amount of work is sometimes necessary to win students over to this way of conducting class. Even when the benefits of flipped learning are made clear to students, some of them will still resist. And to be fair, many instructors fail to listen to what students are really saying.

Most student “complaints” about flipped learning conceal important questions about teaching and learning that are brought to the surface because of the flipped environment. Here are three common issues raised by students and the conversation-starters they afford.
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3 Ways Personal Learning Networks Are Evolving - TeachThought

3 Ways Personal Learning Networks Are Evolving  - TeachThought | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The concept of a Personal Learning Network (PLN) is a familiar concept these days. Yet, the nature of Personal Learning Networks is evolving as the range of tools available to support them increases, and our rapport with those tools becomes more sophisticated.

The aim of this post is to outline the changes that appear to be taking shape, and to offer some practical strategies for teachers to supercharge their Personal Learning Networks.

Via John Evans
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How can universities use MOOCs to recruit students? (essay) @insidehighered

How can universities use MOOCs to recruit students? (essay) @insidehighered | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

But just because there isn’t a viable business model doesn’t mean MOOCs can’t help universities advance their missions. MIT OpenCourseware was launched in 2002, after other universities had launched proto-MOOCs such as Fathom (Columbia, LSE, Chicago, Michigan) and AllLearn (Yale, Stanford, Princeton, Oxford). MIT OpenCourseware published all MIT course materials online and made them available globally. Currently, more than 2,000 courses are posted on the site, which has had more than 125 million visitors, helping to ensure that MIT remains the most searched university online.


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9 Most Powerful Uses of Technology for Learning

9 Most Powerful Uses of Technology for Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Regardless of whether you think every infant needs an iPad, I think we can all agree that technology has changed education for the better. Today's learne

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 1, 8:33 AM

Where will technology make the biggest impact on education? This post shares nine areas, based on research, where the use of technology is making an impact.

What are the ten areas? Below is a list of the top five. Find additional information on each by clicking through to the post, as well as links to other resources.

1. Critical Thinking - In this area four kinds of thinking are discussed: Analogical, Expressive Experiential, and Problem Solving.

2. Mobile Learning

3. Access to Education

4. Continuous Feedback

5. Unlimited and Immediate Learning

Please note that the title on the post days there are ten areas, but number four is missing in the document (or there are only nine areas). I renumbered the areas above so that they are consecutive.

Norton Gusky's curator insight, March 2, 7:27 AM

Ten examples of how technology makes learning more impactful. Examples include : critical thinking, mobile learning, learning to learn, continuous feedback, and global awareness.

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5 Ways You Can Revolutionize Education - Brilliant or Insane

Is feedback for learning revolutionary? Is a Twitter chat about a novel revolutionary? A Smart board? A Learning Management System? What makes something revolutionary in education?

After lengthy consideration, it occurred to me that it’s not things that revolutionize education. Rather, it is people, their ideas and their actions. As educators, we’re “called” to help–to impact lives. Many aspire to this honorable calling, and they all make a difference in some way.

However, only a few will reform a profession that so desperately needs to be reshaped. Only a few will be revolutionaries. You can be one of the few; here’s how.
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[Infographic] Summative and Formative Assessments in eLearning

[Infographic] Summative and Formative Assessments in eLearning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

In eLearning courses, two types of assessments are used – formative and summative. Formative assessments are conducted after completing each topic. On the other hand, a summative assessment is conducted at the end of the course. In formative assessments, feedback is given after each question is answered. The goal of a formative assessment is to reinforce the learning. Whereas, the goal of summative assessments is to evaluate the learner. A summative assessment is similar to a final exam where feedback is not provided and results are shown at the end of the course. This info-graphic shares some information about formative and summative assessments, used in eLearning courses.


Via Edumorfosis, juandoming, Pedro Ramalho, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Armando's curator insight, March 1, 7:02 AM

[Infographic] Summative and Formative Assessments in eLearning

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Steps to Create the Conditions for Deep, Rigorous, Applied Learning

Steps to Create the Conditions for Deep, Rigorous, Applied Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Many school administrators, teachers and parents want the education provided to children to be high quality, rigorous and connected to the world outside the classroom. Teachers are trying to provide these elements in various ways, but a group of schools calling itself the “Deeper Learning Network” has codified some of what its members believe are essential qualities of deep learning (check out how students lead parent teacher conferences in this model). Some of the goals include learning designated content, critical thinking, communication skills, collaborating effectively and connecting learning to real-world experiences.

To better understand what schools in the Deeper Learning Network were doing differently, Monica Martinez and Dennis McGrath visited several schools and wrote a book about what they found: “Deeper Learning How Eight Innovative Public Schools Are Transforming Education in the Twenty-First Century.” They’ve also put together a guide to help interested educators create the conditions necessary to make this model thrive. As the infographic below shows, the model requires a big shift from traditional school and rests on positive school culture and collaborative professional teams of teachers who are committed to the vision of the school.

The introduction to the guide makes the immensity of the task clear: “The Guide offers a framework for planning that addresses the reality that school transformation is an incredibly challenging task that will not work as a top-down mandate and requires time, collective effort, and a shared focus on vision and goals.” The authors hope it will be a resource for educators looking to start this type of transformation, but who are uncertain how to get started.
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Stephen Downes: Half an Hour: Ten Key Takeaways from Tony Bates

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour: Ten Key Takeaways from Tony Bates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Like pretty much everyone else in the field I've been immensely enjoying Tony Bates's work-in-progress, an online open textbook called Teaching in a Digital Age.

Having said that, I think my perspective is very different from his, and this summary post offers me an opportunity to highlight some of those differences. So in what follows, the key points (in italics) are his, while the text that follows is my discussion.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 23, 1:18 AM

Two strong points of view: bound to trigger your thinking!

Cheryl Frose's curator insight, February 26, 12:35 PM

Lots to think about!

Ann Luzeckyj's curator insight, February 26, 5:26 PM

Not strictly related to first year but interesting 

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Faculty, Mobilize for Equity! - Hybrid Pedagogy

The whole theory of modern education is radically unsound. Fortunately in England, at any rate, education produces no effect whatsoever. If it did, it would prove a serious danger to the upper classes, and probably lead to acts of violence in Grosvenor Square. What is your income?” ~ Oscar Wilde’s formidable Lady Bracknell in “The Importance of Being Earnest,” Act I.

And how about traditional higher education in America? What is our income?
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Human-machine symbiosis: Software that augments human thinking

Human-machine symbiosis: Software that augments human thinking | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The IBM computer Deep Blue’s 1997 defeat of world champion Garry Kasparov is one of the most famous events in chess history. But Kasparov himself and some computer scientists believe a more significant result occurred in 2005—and that it should guide how we use technology to make decisions and get work done.


In an unusual online tournament, two U.S. amateurs armed with three PCs snatched a $20,000 prize from a field of supercomputers and grandmasters. The victors’ technology and chess skills were plainly inferior. But they had devised a way of working that created a greater combined intelligence—one in which humans provided insight and intuition, and computers brute-force predictions.


Some companies are now designing software to foster just such man-machine combinations. One that owes its success to this approach is Palantir, a rapidly growing software company in Palo Alto, California, known for its close connections to intelligence agencies. Shyam Sankar, director of forward deployed engineering at the company, says Palantir’s founders became devotees while at PayPal, where they designed an automated system to flag fraudulent transactions. “It catches 80 percent of the fraud, the dumb fraud, but it’s not clever enough for the most sophisticated criminals,” says Sankar.


PayPal ended up creating software to enable humans to hunt for that toughest 20 percent themselves, in the form of a suite of analysis tools that allowed them to act on their own insights about suspicious activity in vast piles of data rather than wait for automated systems to discover it. Palantir, which received funding from the CIA, now sells similar data-analysis software to law enforcement, banks, and other industries.


Sankar describes Palantir’s goal as fostering “human-computer symbiosis,” a term adapted from J.C.R. Licklider, a psychologist and computer scientist who published a prescient essay on the topic in 1960. Sankar contrasts that with what he calls the “AI bias” now dominant in the tech industry. “We focus on helping humans investigate hypotheses,” says Sankar. That’s only possible if analysts have tools that let them creatively examine data from every angle in search of those “aha” moments.

 

In practice, Palantir’s software gives the user tools to explore interconnected data and tries to present the information visually, often as maps that track to how people think. One bank bought the software in order to detect rogue employees stealing or leaking sensitive information. The detective work was guided by when and where employees badged into buildings, and by records of their digital activities on the company’s network. “This is contrary to automated decision making, when an algorithm figures everything out based on past data,” says Ari Gesher, a Palantir engineer. “That works great. Except when the adversary is changing. And many classes of modern problems do have this adaptive adversary in the mix.”


Palantir’s devotion to human–computer symbiosis seems to be working. The nine-year-old company now has 1,200 employees and is expanding into new industries such as health care. Forbes estimated that it was on course for revenues of $450 million in 2013.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff - Edutopia

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff - Edutopia | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved.

However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff.

Via John Evans
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Carol Dweck: The power of believing that you can improve

Carol Dweck: The power of believing that you can improve | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Carol Dweck researches “growth mindset” — the idea that we can grow our brain's capacity to learn and to solve problems. In this talk, she describes two ways to think about a problem that’s slightly too hard for you to solve. Are you not smart enough to solve it … or have you just not solved it yet? A great introduction to this influential field.

 

 

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Open Badges in All Directions

Open Badges in All Directions | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Do you a badge sitting in your Mozilla Backpack that you'd like to share on your Credly profile? Already curating badges from many different sources on Credly and want to showcase other open badges there, too? No problem. Use the "Import Open Badges" menu option in Credly.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Technology upends higher education paradigm

Technology upends higher education paradigm | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Experts across the world agree that online learning is heralding a wave of change in education.

Last month, the Korean government announced it will launch its first platform for massive open online courses, or MOOC, within this year, jumping on the global bandwagon of providing higher education courses online.

It is crucial for the present education system to get off the traditional path because different skill sets are required for the 21st century, said Blackman, who is visiting Seoul for a conference. He pointed out that the so-called “21st century skills” include digital literacy ― knowledge, skills and behaviors used in a broad range of digital devices.

Via Peter Mellow
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

Blended learning will increasingly become the new norm in tertiary education, said the head of a higher education institute whose founding principal was to provide nontraditional learning avenues.

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SEQUENT Consultation Sessions | Opening Up Slovenia

SEQUENT Consultation Sessions | Opening Up Slovenia | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

EventSEQUENT Consultation Sessions

Monday 9 March 2015 at Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia

 

The event is part of a series of ‘SEQUENT Consultation Sessions’ being held around Europe, with the aim of informing educational organisations, particularly QA Agencies and Higher Education Institutions about the latest developments in Quality Assurance of online, distance and open learning, as well as more general innovations in education which may affect quality.

In particular, the events will cover:

Quality Assurance of Open, Flexible and Distance EducationQuality Assurance of Open Education and in particular Open Educational Resources and MOOCs within the main OFDL paradigmPolicy Support for Open and Distance Education Initiatives in the Western Balkans


Via Harvey Mellar
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George Siemens, University of Texas Arlington

George Siemens, University of Texas Arlington | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
“It’s kind of like the question ‘who completes a library?’ We don’t have that mindset toward a library; we take the book we want to read and bring it back. MOOCs are more like that”

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Children's hyperactivity 'is not a real disease', says US expert

Children's hyperactivity 'is not a real disease', says US expert | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
One of the world's leading neuroscientists, whose work has been acknowledged by work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith, has suggested that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not "a real disease".

On the eve of a visit to Britain to meet Duncan Smith and the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, Dr Bruce D Perry told the Observer that the label of ADHD outlined a broad set of symptoms. "It is best thought of as a description. If you look at how you end up with that label, it is remarkable because any one of us at any given time would fit at least a couple of those criteria," he said.
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Create Live Polls For Prezi Presentations With Sli.do

Create Live Polls For Prezi Presentations With Sli.do | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Sli.do is a web service which offers presenters with some very handy options for conducting live polls during presentations.

Via Maria Margarida Correia, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Brain myths busted

Brain myths busted | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Let’s look at some myths that have been circulating about the brain

 

These disciplines have been around in some form since ancient times, so you’d think that by now we’d know all there is to know about the brain. Nothing could be further from the truth. After thousands of years of studying and treating every aspect of it, there are still many facets of the brain that remain mysterious. And because the brain is so complex, we tend to simplify information about how it works in order to make it more understandable. Both of these things put together have resulted in many myths about the brain reports science.howstuffworks.com. Most aren’t completely off — we just haven’t quite heard the whole story. Let’s look at some myths that have been circulating about the brain, starting with, of all things, its colour.
Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, February 27, 8:12 PM

An Indian news site has a go at listing some contemporary brain myths.  It includes: learning through subconscious messages. listening to Mozart makes you smarter and alcohol kills the brain. Nice effort.

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Sign up for a new online course on interactive data visualization for the web using D3.js

Sign up for a new online course on interactive data visualization for the web using D3.js | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
If you want to go beyond the basics of working on pre-built charts and start to learn how to merge design and web development to create fully customized interactive visualizat

Via Peter Mellow
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New generation of teachers faces digital age that can be short on forgiveness

New generation of teachers faces digital age that can be short on forgiveness | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
"If we want to understand the world of our youth, we have to extend ourselves into their digital spaces," Couros said.

Safety and potential hazards only comprise a small chunk of total digital citizenship.

Other elements include communication, rights and responsibilities, etiquette and literacy.

Via Peter Mellow
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Will Professors teach differently in 10 Years?

Will Professors teach differently in 10 Years? | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
The universities must not only reward and promote innovations in the teaching methodologies, but must also provide teacher development programs, in order to cultivate and support new educational approaches.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 26, 5:17 PM

Good to think about this issue now and plan for it...

Tony Guzman's curator insight, March 2, 3:25 PM

This article shares some insights on the question of whether instructors will teach any differently in 10 years. Any surprises?

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What do we mean by quality when teaching in a digital age? | Tony Bates

What do we mean by quality when teaching in a digital age? | Tony Bates | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

The aim of this chapter is to provide some practical guidelines for teachers and instructors to ensure quality teaching in a digital age. Before I can do this, however, it is necessary to clarify what is meant by ‘quality’ in education, because I am using ‘quality’ here in a very specific way.

 

Definitions

Probably there is no other topic in education which generates so much discussion and controversy as ‘quality’. Many books have been written on the topic, but I will cut to the chase and give my definition of quality up-front. For the purposes of this book, quality is defined as:

teaching methods that successfully help learners develop the knowledge and skills they will require in a digital age.

- See more at: http://www.tonybates.ca/2015/02/23/what-do-we-mean-by-quality-when-teaching-in-a-digital-age/comment-page-1/#comment-1668810

 


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Browse articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience

Browse articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Browse a list of resources, articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience.

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