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Looking Ahead: The Future of the Internet

Looking Ahead: The Future of the Internet | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
What will the internet look like in the near future, 20 years, 100 years? We explore the possibilities in this illustration.

Via Lauren Moss
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|\/|ichae|_ \/\/hette|\|'s curator insight, August 1, 9:47 AM

Interesting article - beware of Skynet though!

Jim Doyle's curator insight, August 17, 6:37 AM

The Future of the Internet

Idris Grant's curator insight, August 25, 3:31 PM

With all the talk of "The Internet of Things," and the rapid advances we're seeing with all-things web, smart devices and hyper-connected world, we found this Infographic goes a long way to tell the story.

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Digital Curation Among Key Future Jobs: TheFutureShow with Gerd Leonhard

This is episode #3 of The Future Show (TFS) with Gerd Leonhard, season 1. Topics: In the future, most repetitive or machine-like tasks and jobs will be large...

Via Robin Good
Miloš Bajčetić's insight:

Very interesting video, but regarding point 3. that "We are moving to right-brain work-jobs" I must note there are no "right-brain" jobs. This left-right brain distinction is oversimplified neuromyth.

 

“The latest findings from the real neuroscience of creativity suggest that the right brain/left brain distinction does not offer us the full picture of how creativity is implemented in the brain.* Creativity does not involve a single brain region or single side of the brain.” (http://t.co/3l5nM7IsEi)

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Robin Good's curator insight, May 26, 2:57 PM



Media and technology futurist Gerd Leonhard outlines his vision of the future of work given the many profound changes shaping the planet during the coming decades.


Key highlights: 


  1. We will be able to offload tedious, repetitive work to computers and robots who will replace rapidly many of our present jobs

  2. At the same time entirely new jobs will be created - for example:
    Digital Curation 
    Social Engineering
    Artificial Intelligence Designers 

  3. We are moving to right-brain work-jobs - that is: storytelling, emotions, creativity and imagination, negotiation 

  4. Education prepares us by having us learn things that we may need later. But in most cases we don't need those things but we rather need to know how to learn new things.

  5. More craftmanship-type of jobs like cooks, makers, hackers, coders, will fluorish as computers-machines cannot replicate such skills (yet)



Original video: http://youtu.be/X-PnJblNJng 


Full episode page: http://thefutureshow.tv/episode-3/ 




Stephen Dale's curator insight, May 28, 5:46 AM

The future of work. 

Bettina Ascaino's curator insight, June 9, 10:53 PM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Media and technology futurist Gerd Leonhardoutlines his vision of the future of work given the many profound changes shaping the planet during the coming decades.

 

Key highlights: 

 

We will be able to offload tedious, repetitive work to computers and robots who will replace rapidly many of our present jobs

At the same time entirely new jobs will be created - for example:
Digital Curation 
Social Engineering
Artificial Intelligence Designers 

We are moving to right-brain work-jobs - that is: storytelling, emotions, creativity and imagination, negotiation 

Education prepares us by having us learn things that we may need later. But in most cases we don't need those things but we rather need to know how to learn new things.

More craftmanship-type of jobs like cooks, makers, hackers, coders, will fluorish as computers-machines cannot replicate such skills (yet)

 

 

Original video: http://youtu.be/X-PnJblNJng ;

 

Full episode page: http://thefutureshow.tv/episode-3/ ;

 
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Cambrian Explosion of Technology: Stephen Wolfram Wants To Inject Computation Everywhere

Cambrian Explosion of Technology: Stephen Wolfram Wants To Inject Computation Everywhere | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

At the 2014 SXSW Conference, Stephen Wolfram introduced the Wolfram Language, a symbolic language.  His video presentation shows some of  the profound implications of this new technology.


Imagine a future where there's no distinction between code and data. Where computers are operated by programming languages that work like human language, where knowledge and data are built in, where everything can be computed symbolically like the X and Y of school algebra problems. Where everything obvious is automated; the not-so-obvious revealed and made ready to explore. A future where billions of interconnected devices and ubiquitous networks can be readily harnessed by injecting computation.


That's the future Stephen Wolfram has pursued for over 25 years: Mathematica, the computable knowledge of Wolfram|Alpha, the dynamic interactivity of Computable Document Format, and soon, the universally accessible and computable model of the world made possible by the Wolfram Language and Wolfram Engine.


"Of the various things I've been trying to explain, this is one of the more difficult ones," Wolfram told Wired recently. What Wolfram Language essentially does, is work like a plug-in-play system for programmers, with many subsystems already in place.  Wolfram calls this knowledge-based programming.

Wolfram Language has a vast depth of built-in algorithms and knowledge, all automatically accessible through its elegant unified symbolic language. Scalable for programs from tiny to huge, with immediate deployment locally and in the cloud, the Wolfram Language builds on clear principles to create what Wolfram claims will be the world's most productive programming language.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide

The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
There is a evil side of Google which revealed itself in the Filter Bubble, invasion of privacy, the lack of transparency, in the monopoly induction of behavior and especially in what is happening in the search environment.

Via Robin Good
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Stephen Dale's curator insight, January 13, 5:58 AM

People who use Google are given the impression that they are interacting with the data out there, but they are actually interacting with Google and its view of the world.

 

"They are prediction engines that constantly refine a theory about who you are and what you are going to do or want next. Together, they create an universe of data for each one of us."

"In a 2010 paper published in the Scientific American journal, Tim Berners-Lee warned about companies developing ever more “closed” products and “data islands”.

"Morville, in his book Search Patterns, says that the first and second results receive 80% of attention. The vertical approach suggests to the user the idea of a single result that fully answers the question, enclosing possibilities and preventing alternative realization."


Or in other words, is our acceptance of what we see in search results eroding our ability (or willingness) to consider alternatives and employ critical thinking?

Lucy Beaton's curator insight, January 16, 8:21 PM

This is alarming.  We, as Teacher Librarians, need to be aware of the ramifications of this.

Mrs. Dilling's curator insight, February 13, 11:52 AM

My favorite statement, "we must always be aware and well informed about the intentions of companies, and never stop having multiple options for any service."

 

This article was an eye opener for me. I had never questioned Google before.

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The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part I

The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part I | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Content curation tools are in their infancy. Nonetheless you see so many of them around, there are more new curation tools coming your way soon, with lots of new features and options.

Via Robin Good
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Josep A. Pérez Castelló's curator insight, February 14, 4:01 AM

Si os dedicáis a gestionar y organizar contenidos que después compartís en la red (content curator) este post recomendado por el profesor J. Salinas es fenomenal. Hay que leerlo.

SMOOC's curator insight, February 20, 1:27 PM

Interesting write up on content curation tools from Robin Good (pt. 1)

TeresaSiluar's curator insight, April 12, 1:34 PM

Artículo de Robin Good en el que habla de las posibilidades de las herramientas de content curation.

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Technology 101: What Do We Need To Know About The Future We're Creating? - Hybrid Pedagogy

Technology 101: What Do We Need To Know About The Future We're Creating? - Hybrid Pedagogy | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
If we don't already know the answers to these questions, what do we need to know to design, deploy, control, and live humanely with the tools we are creating?

 

Where are we going? Do we want to go there? Is there anything we can do about it? I have written this because I hope we can think together about where these questions lead. Perhaps there are solutions that can only be found by many of us, working together.

Thinking critically about the technosphere we inhabit, which defines who we are and dictates how we live and die, is scary — like thinking about performing surgery on yourself. Your internal denial alarms are going off already, I know. But I urge you to repress the urge to rise to the defense of penicillin and civilization, and consider how I came to rethink my attitudes.

You’re reading this on the web, after all. I do all the HTML myself. I upload it to the server. I do a little PhotoShop, a little Unix. I’m not an archgeek, but neither am I totally unaware of how this new stuff works. It is possible to think critically about technology without running off to the woods — although, I must warn you, it is possible that you will never be quite so comfortable again about the moral dimensions of progress and the part we all play in it. I know that I’m not.

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Stephen Hawking: 'Implications of artificial intelligence - are we taking AI seriously enough?'

Stephen Hawking: 'Implications of artificial intelligence - are we taking AI seriously enough?' | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
With the Hollywood blockbuster Transcendence playing in cinemas, with Johnny Depp and Morgan Freeman showcasing clashing visions for the future of humanity, it's tempting to dismiss the notion of highly intelligent machines as mere science fiction. But this would be a mistake, and potentially our worst mistake in history.

 

Artificial-intelligence (AI) research is now progressing rapidly. Recent landmarks such as self-driving cars, a computer winning at Jeopardy! and the digital personal assistants Siri, Google Now and Cortana are merely symptoms of an IT arms race fuelled by unprecedented investments and building on an increasingly mature theoretical foundation. Such achievements will probably pale against what the coming decades will bring.

 

The potential benefits are huge; everything that civilisation has to offer is a product of human intelligence; we cannot predict what we might achieve when this intelligence is magnified by the tools that AI may provide, but the eradication of war, disease, and poverty would be high on anyone's list. Success in creating AI would be the biggest event in human history.

 

Unfortunately, it might also be the last, unless we learn how to avoid the risks. In the near term, world militaries are considering autonomous-weapon systems that can choose and eliminate targets; the UN and Human Rights Watch have advocated a treaty banning such weapons. In the medium term, as emphasised by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee in The Second Machine Age, AI may transform our economy to bring both great wealth and great dislocation.

 

Looking further ahead, there are no fundamental limits to what can be achieved: there is no physical law precluding particles from being organised in ways that perform even more advanced computations than the arrangements of particles in human brains. An explosive transition is possible, although it might play out differently from in the movie: as Irving Good realised in 1965, machines with superhuman intelligence could repeatedly improve their design even further, triggering what Vernor Vinge called a "singularity" and Johnny Depp's movie character calls "transcendence".

 

One can imagine such technology outsmarting financial markets, out-inventing human researchers, out-manipulating human leaders, and developing weapons we cannot even understand. Whereas the short-term impact of AI depends on who controls it, the long-term impact depends on whether it can be controlled at all.

 

So, facing possible futures of incalculable benefits and risks, the experts are surely doing everything possible to ensure the best outcome, right? Wrong. If a superior alien civilisation sent us a message saying, "We'll arrive in a few decades," would we just reply, "OK, call us when you get here – we'll leave the lights on"? Probably not – but this is more or less what is happening with AI. Although we are facing potentially the best or worst thing to happen to humanity in history, little serious research is devoted to these issues outside non-profit institutes such as the Cambridge Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, the Future of Humanity Institute, the Machine Intelligence Research Institute, and the Future of Life Institute. All of us should ask ourselves what we can do now to improve the chances of reaping the benefits and avoiding the risks.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Tekrighter's curator insight, May 19, 9:58 AM

Do we need to control it, or learn to coexist with it?

oliviersc's comment, May 19, 4:01 PM
Partagé dans la Revue de blogs : Olivier-SC = http://oxymoron-fractal.blogspot.fr/2014/05/olivier-sc.html
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Bringing Together Learning Science and Technology to Envision “Education 3.0”

Bringing Together Learning Science and Technology to Envision “Education 3.0” | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it
Sharing Reflections and Fun Takeaways from Dr. Jeff Borden's Inspiring Keynote Presentation at NERCOMP 2014. Have you ever stumbled across an insight into how

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Where education technology will — and won’t — take us by 2024

Where education technology will — and won’t — take us by 2024 | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

Professor Larry Cuban:

 

With all of the above occurring, one would think that by 2024, age-graded schools and the familiar teaching and learning that occurs today in K-12 and universities  would have exited the rear door.

I do not think so. Getting access to powerful electronic devices for all students and teachers is surely a victory for those who believe in better technologies solving teaching and learning problems. But access does not guarantee use, especially the kind of use that vendors and ardent technophiles seek.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Steve Vaitl's curator insight, December 26, 2013 11:04 AM

Tech in education - enhancement not destruction, just my not-so-humble opinion.

Aunty Alice's curator insight, December 26, 2013 1:34 PM

Better technology to solve learning and teaching problems is a great thought but should not be seen as the bottom line. Identifying the problems accurately so they can be focussed  on with purpose, practicing to put into the long term memory, motivating  and rewarding the student...have to be in the  mix too, not to mention self discipline and good mental and physical health. 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 26, 2013 2:58 PM

"None of these incremental changes herald the disappearance of K-12 age-graded public schools or the dominant patterns of teacher-centered instruction. What these gradual changes will translate into is an array of options for teaching and learning available to both teachers and students."

 

This is particularly disconcerting. Without a shift away from the way we have always done things, will education really meet the demands of th 21st Century?

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This is how Learning Will Look Like in The Future ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

This is how Learning Will Look Like in The Future ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Learning & Mind & Brain | Scoop.it

It's really hard to anticipate what the field of education will look like in the next coming years. Technology and digital media have radically changed the entire learning ecosystem and this is only the beginning because the real impact wont be visible till decades later. This is exactly what happened with the invention of the printing press.

 

When Gutenburg first invented the printing press in the 15th century he did not have any idea of the transformative change this machine would bring to the entire humankind. A century later and after printing became a taken-for-granted part of life only then people realized the grandeur of such invention.

 

This is probably what will happen with learning too. Knowledge Works have taken a look into the future of education and learning ecosystem and prepared for you this awesome graphic which I came across in Mindshift. Have a look and share with us what you think of it. enjoy


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Sue Alexander
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Chris Carter's comment, July 28, 2013 6:49 PM
Thank you, Sue! You may want to check out Yasemin Allsop's curated Scoop.It account, too: http://www.scoop.it/t/technology-in-education-by-yasemin-allsop
Sue Alexander's curator insight, July 28, 2013 7:42 PM

The vision of learning presented in this infographic is so exciting. Even better, it will be my students who build this new learning structure. 

Chris Carter's comment, July 30, 2013 1:22 AM
Wonderful! Thank you for this!