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On vacation with Fujifilm X-T1 + 14mm + X100s | Lars Øivind Authen

On vacation with Fujifilm X-T1 + 14mm + X100s | Lars Øivind Authen | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

I recently spend one week camping in the southern and south western part of Norway, on the coast line from Kristiansand to Stavanger. It's a beautiful area of Norway I think, especially in the summer. You don't have the nice deep fjords of western Norway, or the mountains of North Norway that goes steep into the sea - but this part of Norway has its beauty of its own I think. I could have used a lower ISO and 1/60 sec and gotten a sharp image - but the wind made the grass swayed in the wind so I bumped the ISO to 800. Also I wanted to use f/16 to get it nice and sharp from front to back. I travelled together with my wife. She is pregnant, and that made some impact of what I could and could not do. Most of my photos were taken during day time, in harsh sun light. Not the best time of the day for taking pictures. Still, I managed to get out some mornings on my own and take som shots, while she was sleeping.....


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Millstones and Meadows with the Fuji 14mm | Nick Lukey

Millstones and Meadows with the Fuji 14mm | Nick Lukey | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


My new wide-angle has arrived, my 18mm was never really wide enough, so took the plunge and bought the 14mm F2.8.

The build quality as usual is first class, nice weight, all metal contstruction, feels nicely balanced when attached to the camera. The aperture ring has full and half click stops. First gripe, the aperture ring is way too loose, and can easily be caught whilst shooting. The manual focus ring is nice and has a great feel. A bonus with the ring is that it switches from Af to Manual focus by pushing the ring forward or pulling it back. Overall the quality feel of the lens, the distance markings and the depth of field scale, reveal a superb attention to detail by Fuji.

So whats it like to use in the field, one word FANTASTIC. It's pin sharp, with a great depth of field, shooting either in af or manual mode is easy, set it up for zone focus, or hyperfocal and it gives you the depth of field to make quick street shooting a breeze. A minor nitpick is the lens hood, just a little bit too big and shows up a little too much in the viewfinder, when shooting with the OVF. However minor niggles aside, it is a great lens, delivers punchy sharp images with great IQ. All I need now is the big zoom and I will be totally setup.  Some images taken with the 14mm and the Fuji Xpro 1.

 

 


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Zone Focus Test With the Fujinon 14mm Lens | Gene Lowinger

Zone Focus Test With the Fujinon 14mm Lens | Gene Lowinger | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Wow, was it ever cold in New York on Sunday! The wind chill was brutal, but I was itching to try some focus tests and I was blown away by the results. But first some clarification. Hyperfocal distance is the closest distance that a lens will be in focus and still be able to keep focus at infinity reasonably sharp. Zone focusing requires that the lens have distance indications on its barrel for each appropriate aperture setting, thus allowing the photographer to set the range of distances within which any objects will appear reasonably in focus. When I shot film in my Leica M6 I often used zone focusing, but rarely  the hyperfocal distance. With a very wide angle lens, such as the 14mm, I'm shooting to create a perception of great depth, I don't really care that objects in the far distance are out of focus. But when I shoot street, and especially when shooting from the hip, sometimes the autofocus on the camera either doesn't understand what I want to be in focus (it's often an object or person at one side of the frame, while the focus point for the sensor is set for the center of the frame) or the autofocus lag (even at 1/10th second) misses the shot. The first case scenario happens more than I'd like, the second case much less often - so much less that it's not even worth considering.

 When I decided to run this test I wanted to err on the side of caution, so I opted to shoot part of the afternoon in autofocus, just to make sure I'd get some good shots to show for my afternoon of braving the cold. The zone focus shots were taken at f8 (less than that would have narrowed the depth of field unacceptable for the test) and 1/250th second, which put my exposures in the high ISO range - not a problem for the X-Pro1 processor. Here's a calculator to play with to discover acceptable in-focus distances. Remember that this calculation has nothing to do with the quality of the lens, the parameters that affect the calculation are the lens focal length, the aperture setting, and the distances involved. All the rest is pure physics and math. If I set my 14mm lens at f8 and the focus at a distance of 4 feet, my nearest acceptable in-focus distance will be a tiny bit over 2 feet away and the farthest will be 243.5 feet. If I set the focus point for 1/2 foot closer, 3.5 feet, that range drops from 1.9 feet to 24.9 feet. So to achieve a difference of about 1/10 foot closer, I'd have to loose about 220 feet in distance. Given the way I shoot, in close, I'd go for the closest possible I can get and still bet some reasonable distance focus. Even at a focus point of 3 feet I can get an acceptable image from 1.75 feet to almost 10 feet. That last zone is probably the best for me. That's why I love using very wide angle lenses. I would suggest to anyone that they play with this calculator to get a feel for how the calculations work, so that out in the field there is a lot less guessing. If you happen to be a math wizard, you might want to make note of these formulae and when your out in the field do your own calculations (while I take the pictures)....


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A New Toy | Gene Lowinger

A New Toy | Gene Lowinger | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Oh goody! I just received my Fujinon 14mm f2.8 lens today. I'd been waiting for it since September. Hopefully, if the temperature is not too brutal for my old bones, I'll get out and shoot with it this weekend. When I was shooting film with my Leica M6 my favorite lens to use was the Leica 21mm, the equivalent to the Fuji lens in focal length. So I'm going to have a chance to dig deep into my bag of tricks (that's a euphemism for trying to remember old techniques). We shall see.....

Both these shots were made with the 18-55mm zoom lens. I would like to have been able to zoom out wider for the first image, but street happens so fast that's not always possible. Would have been a much better shot with some space at the top of the frame. But I still like her expression. I caught this gentleman with the very cool beard on 34th Street just after leaving a critique session at B&H Photo. There's just something about facial hair, whether on a man or woman, that's so much fun to shoot.


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Fuji x100s Follow Up Review :: Life Without DSLRs

Fuji x100s Follow Up Review :: Life Without DSLRs | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it
I have been DSLR free for about two months and all is well. During the past two months I’ve been to Cuba, New York (x2), and Arizona. I feel I have hit just about every type, and kind, of job I do and my little Fujis have performed flawlessly.

Via Philippe Gassmann
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How to never miss another shot with the Fujifilm X-E1: Zone focusing | Mike Kobal

How to never miss another shot with the Fujifilm X-E1: Zone focusing | Mike Kobal | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

 

This is a quick guide on how to set up your Fujifilm X-E1 for general street photography: Amazingly easy with the 14mm, since all we have to do is switch to manual focus mode, and check the “zone of acceptable sharpness”, indicated on the DOF scale for the chosen aperture. This caused confusion because the digital indicator does not correspond to the markings on the 14mm and some of you emailed, wondering if you were reading the markings incorrectly. For a given image format, depth of field is determined by three factors: the focal length of the lens, the aperture and the camera-to-subject distance. On the Fujinon 14mm, at F16, when focused near the 1m mark, the markings on the lens barrel indicate an acceptable focus zone from infinity to approximately 0.5m. This covers quite a range and I found it to be a realistic estimation of what I consider “sharp enough”, your mileage may vary, since the acceptable circle of confusion varies relative to the amount of magnification of your image. The digital DOF indicator shows a much shorter zone when focused near the 1m mark, from about 0.75m to approx 2.5m. (If you are super critical or make huge prints or projections, this might be the scale to go by) which corresponds roughly to the f8 on the lens barrel. When shooting with the 18mmat f5.6 for instance, I found the DOF indicator very conservative and in general assume when focused around the 3m mark to get everything from 2m to approx 5m in focus, the digital scale indicates about 1/2 of that. The only gripe when zone focusing on the 18mm is the lack of a focus lock, see the image below for my solution:) It is very easy to accidentally turn the focus ring and ruin your capture, the rubber band holds the focusing ring in place. Not a problem on the 14mm, since we can check the focus setting right on the lens and don’t have to look at the LCD or through the EVF, which allows us to set focus BEFORE we lift the camera to frame the shot. The way Fuji implemented manual focus, in addition to the small size and light weight, makes the Fujinon 14mm a real winner in practical shooting situations.....


Via Thomas Menk
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Just get it! (Fujinon XF 14mm F2.8) | Olaf Sztaba

Just get it! (Fujinon XF 14mm F2.8) | Olaf Sztaba | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Since I sold my SLR gear and started shooting exclusively with X-series cameras I have started enjoying photography once again. I spend less time playing with menus and settings and focus instead on light and composition.

The biggest drawback of the system so far has been the lack of wide-angle lenses – my favourite perspective. But my problem has been solved. This weekend I picked up the latest Fuji lens – XF 14mm F2.8. What a lens it is!

I came from the pro-level Nikon and Canon gear and after one day of shooting, this lens has impressed me. In fact, after my initial assessment this is the best wide-angle lens I have ever shot with. (To make it even more interesting, the very same day I borrowed a Nikon D800 with the AF-S 14-24mm 2.8 zoom lens and used it along with my Fuji X-Pro1 and XF 14mm F2.8. You will find the whole story of my “Camera Fever” episode in the next post. For now all I can say that the Nikon D800 and its super-heavy lens is back in a store). Having said that, I am not going to give a scientific review (I prefer to spend time photographing); instead I would like to share a few images I shot yesterday with this newest lens. Please note that these are sample images without any distortion correction applied. Processed in Capture One 7 and Lightroom 4.


Via Thomas Menk
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