Best Quality Mirr...
Follow
Find tag "Fuji X-Pro1"
2.7K views | +2 today
Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras
The best out there light carrying.
Curated by Lainer
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Black and White Sydney | Daniel Incandela

Black and White Sydney | Daniel Incandela | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

In all my travels, Sydney has been the toughest opponent when it comes to jet lag. It will lull you to sleep, then dump cold water on you at 2am. This time I played it differently. You can’t fall asleep if you don’t stop moving. I landed in Sydney from LAX at 7am. I grabbed my camera and walked around a very quiet city, and for some reason, I chose to only shoot in black and white. I guess I wanted to see the city in a new way. There is something special about a city just waking up......


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

X-Pro1 Using Custom Settings | For RAW Shooters and Film Fanatics | Adam J Piper

Custom settings can be an extension of the film simulations, adding another layer to your jpgs, or they can be set up to give you the best preview of your RAW files, enabling you to make better exposure decisions. I show you how to set them up, use them effectively and some of my favourite settings for your Fuji X cameras....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Leo GM's comment, June 12, 2013 6:07 AM
this is very helpful!
Paul Presnail's comment, June 14, 2013 7:27 AM
Thank you!
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Streets of NY | Karim Haddad

Streets of NY | Karim Haddad | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


A week ago at this time, I was on a train heading to New York. I was going on business and unfortunately, I was only staying for two days. Despite being off Sunday through Tuesday, I had to rush back for a Saturday shift that none of my colleagues were willing or able to pick up. I would have loved to stay in NYC for a few more days. Although I’ve been recently trying my hand at street photography, I wouldn’t call myself a street photographer. I prefer landscapes and other subjects. Perhaps a big part of that is the city that I’ve done most of my urban photography in – Washington, DC. Anyone who knows me well will tell you that after 20+ years, I’ve had enough of this place. I’m long overdue for a change and hope to end up in a ‘new’ and colorful city very soon. The next chapter of my life likely won’t be played out in New York City. But being on the streets there with my Fuji X-Pro1 – even if only for a few rushed hours – was a real pleasure. I could see myself indulging in street photography everyday if I lived there. A marvelous stage with a plethora of various characters. I must go back soon.....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

FUJIFILM XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS | Yodobashi

FUJIFILM XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS  | Yodobashi | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

Google Translater (JP -> ENG)

XF lens Fujifilm's whole body. This is why a standard range zoom and prime lenses some have been line-up so far, telephoto zoom system was released finally. Because it had been published previously in the lens roadmap Fujifilm-provided, of course, but also for everyone currently under consideration, all of you are using the X-Series feel lens that have been waiting for that me appeared or would not be. Lens attractive does have XF lens, but in the scene you want drawn to the subject at hand, it was the place I want a telephoto system still. Has a zoom range of 305mm from 84mm in 35mm format, because it is a spec of camera shake correction function with the 4.5 stage of Furthermore, it can you make it possible to shoot without being bound to the situation and time zone more than ever will. I did what you said I tried shooting in various conditions this time, depiction with the three-dimensional impression and dense and the strength of the backlight to the expected. It is in the presence of slightly larger certainly in the XF lineup of lenses, but also have this capability, and much more compact compared to the lens of the same class of single-lens reflex. I can say us to enable new shooting style, and reliable lens.


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Thomas Menk's curator insight, June 11, 2013 2:28 AM

Google Translater (JP -> ENG)
http://bit.ly/18rjnss

 

Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

The Fuji X pro 1 and Legacy Glass | Nick Lukey

The Fuji X pro 1 and Legacy Glass | Nick Lukey | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


When I replaced the X100 with the X pro 1, I began to explore the possibilities of using legacy glass, being able to use pretty much any lens from any system is such a bonus with the Fuji X series. As I didn't own a 60 mm I wanted something with a little more throw, a lightweight telephoto and believe me you have hundreds to choose from. Therein lies the difficulty which one do you choose. My choice was based around image quality, a nice wide aperture, and finally portability. I settled on the Zuiko, as it ticked all the boxes for me, Image quality is great, punchy colour with  good contrast and its sharp. The bonus is that its tiny a little over 2 inches tall. It balances well in the hand, and adds very little weight. The great thing about the old zuiko lenses is that the aperture ring is toward the front of the lens, making aperture adjustments is easy. Since the latest firmware additions, manual focus is achieved quite quickly and feels much more positive, using the evf and a magnify setting of 3x allows pretty accurate focus. Although you need to allow for evf wobble. Nice and sharp with a nicely rendered background bokeh is very pleasant on this lens. Colour is very natural, with no obvious colour casts, contrast is excellent, and cannot find any evidence of colour fringing. I need to get a nice lens hood for it though. Overall the lens is a decent performer, and for around £120 for the lens and adapter, gives great bang for the buck. Al I need do now is to save my pennies, for either the 14mm or the Voigtlander 12mm. All the images apart from the lens on camera shots, were shot in raw and converted using the new capture One software, more on this later.....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Findings | X-Pro1 is ready to go underwater! | Asylum Photo

Findings | X-Pro1 is ready to go underwater! | Asylum Photo | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

DiCAPac WP-S3 Waterproof case for Mirrorless Camera

 


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Fujifilm XE1 vs Fuji XPro1 Camera | Ben Evans

 

English Photographer Ben Evans compares the Fuji XE1 and XPro1 cameras in Barcelona. Hand-on photography with several photographs made with the cameras during the review.

The balance is that the Fuji XE1, while lacking the hybrid optical/electronic viewfinder makes up for this with a cheaper price, upgraded EVF (electronic viewfinder), built-in flash and slightly smaller size. It was therefore the 'winner' in this little hands-on camera test.

Many thanks to Hiromi from www.HiromiTorres.com for shooting this video! If you'd like to get in touch and contribute to a microphone for her so that future tutorials and reviews sound better, she'd really appreciate it!....



Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Just get it! (Fujinon XF 14mm F2.8) | Olaf Sztaba

Just get it! (Fujinon XF 14mm F2.8) | Olaf Sztaba | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Since I sold my SLR gear and started shooting exclusively with X-series cameras I have started enjoying photography once again. I spend less time playing with menus and settings and focus instead on light and composition.

The biggest drawback of the system so far has been the lack of wide-angle lenses – my favourite perspective. But my problem has been solved. This weekend I picked up the latest Fuji lens – XF 14mm F2.8. What a lens it is!

I came from the pro-level Nikon and Canon gear and after one day of shooting, this lens has impressed me. In fact, after my initial assessment this is the best wide-angle lens I have ever shot with. (To make it even more interesting, the very same day I borrowed a Nikon D800 with the AF-S 14-24mm 2.8 zoom lens and used it along with my Fuji X-Pro1 and XF 14mm F2.8. You will find the whole story of my “Camera Fever” episode in the next post. For now all I can say that the Nikon D800 and its super-heavy lens is back in a store). Having said that, I am not going to give a scientific review (I prefer to spend time photographing); instead I would like to share a few images I shot yesterday with this newest lens. Please note that these are sample images without any distortion correction applied. Processed in Capture One 7 and Lightroom 4.


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Goa, India - X-Pro1 and VSCO Film Emulation | Tim Steadman

Goa, India - X-Pro1 and VSCO Film Emulation |  Tim Steadman | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


I haven't gone out and photographed much personal work since returning from Europe a month ago with one less appendix. Couple the appendectomy recovery with a bit of "nesting syndrome" (my wife is about to give birth to our first child any day now), I've spent most of my time organizing my home and streamlining my Lightroom catalogue (guided by Gavin Gough via his great eBook w/video tutorials - A Photographers Workflow). The south end of Bogmalo Beach, Goa, India.  Fuji X-Pro 1, 18mm (wishing there was a wider lens available from Fuji). Whilst keywording my library, I came across some images I took last October in Goa.  To break the metadata monotony, I decided to run the images through some Lightroom presets I just acquired from Visual Supply Company called VSCO Film Emulation 01 & 02.  I've never been a big preset user, but have always liked the way these presets have worked with photos I've seen from other photographers. These images were photographed in RAW with the Fuji X-Pro1.  They were then imported into Lightroom to develop.   When I started applying some of the VSCO Film presets to these RAW files, I didn't like what I was seeing at all.  I didn't understand why the presets looked so terrible compared to when I used them on some of my Pushkar Camel Fair photos.  I realized a few minutes later that the only difference was that I was applying the presets to the JPEG files I photographed in Pushkar (I photographed RAW+Jpeg that week), not the RAW files. The rocks on the south end of Bogmalo Beach, Goa, India. 18mm lens

To see what would happen, I decided to put the 3 month old RAW images (whose names I've changed by now) back on my SD card in hopes to process them into JPEG images in camera.  Thankfully the images popped up on the back of the X-Pro 1 and I processed the RAW files into JPEGs with the Velvia film simulation applied in camera.  I then imported the JPEG files back into Lightroom and BOOM, it made a world of a difference.  I applied various VSCO Film presets and eventually settled on the look of the Kodak Protra 160 VC++.  Lightroom doesn't have camera profiles yet for the X-Pro 1 like it does for my Canon 5D Mark II.  Since buying the X-Pro 1, I've tried to tweak the Lightroom settings to try and create a profile to match the X-Pro 1 in camera Velvia film simulation, but haven't figured it out yet. So, long story short, these images were photographed with the X-Pro 1 in Raw and converted to Jpeg in camera with Velvia film simulation applied.  They were then imported to Lightroom where I applied the VSCO Film preset Kodak Protra 160 VC++.

Please share feedback or any of your own experiences....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Fujifilm X-Pro1 Six Week Update | Rodney Boles

Fujifilm X-Pro1 Six Week Update | Rodney Boles | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


It seems that there is a ton of interest in the Fuji cameras, which is a good thing. There should be. I thought I’d offer an update now that I’ve had the camera for 6 weeks. Since the earlier post, I’ve used the X-Pro1 for 2 model shoots (for portions of the shoots, anyway), Christmas snapshots, a foggy day landscape shoot, as a second body for a concert at a local club, a photowalk around the NC State University campus, and carried it with me on various family outings (“just in case”). I would have shot more, but I spent a big chunk of the last month dealing with the flu and its aftermath. But, all in all, a good cross section of the sort of shooting I like to do. One thing I noticed (when I wasn’t sick), something about having this small camera makes me want to get out and walk around and shoot. I can’t wait to take a trip to NYC with this thing. I always felt so conspicuous with a big camera. I thought it best to divide my comments up in terms of the specific type of shoot. Photos from each (except my holiday snapshots) are included in the gallery.....

 


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

FujiFilm X-Pro1 | Dave Kai Piper

FujiFilm X-Pro1 |  Dave Kai Piper | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

Fashion + Art + Commercial + Photography by Dave Kai Piper


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Dave Kai-Piper's comment, January 27, 2013 2:17 AM
I can clear up this problem - All of the photos in the gallery had been placed onto a template in photoshop ( all of the photographs in my portfolio have been laid out this way ) This is why all the exif data matches. You will also note that some of the 'photos' are doubled up. At the moment, I am un aware of a jpeg being about to hold two sets of exif data. I really would not look into this that much.
Carsten Bockermann's comment, January 27, 2013 2:42 AM
Thanks for the clarification. I noticed that the EXIF was the same in all of the pics and didn't match the lighting situation at all (you don't shoot at f/2.2, 1/200 at ISO 200 in a subway station).
Dave Kai-Piper's comment, January 28, 2013 4:26 PM
http://www.davepiper.org.uk/blog/fujifilm-x-pro1 - So I have gone head and updated the Gallery also :)
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Capture One 7.0.2 (Support for FujiFilm X-Trans Files) | Terrance Lam

Capture One 7.0.2 (Support for FujiFilm X-Trans Files) | Terrance Lam | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Today Phase One released an update for Capture One to support the FujiFilm X-Trans formats. This includes both the X-Pro1 and the X-E1 cameras.

I've been testing them out the last couple of weeks and been very pleased by the results. Although I'm hesitant to call it perfect (my own workflow still yield slightly better results in resolution) I'm pleased at least to say that there's a professional raw processor that supports the FujiFilm X-format that has the same workflow efficiencies as Adobe Lightroom. It resolves much of the nagging issues that some users complain about using Adobe Camera RAW or Lightroom, and yields the professional and user friendly software of Capture One.

I've also used the latest Capture One (7.0.2) for several weeks with my Canon EOS 5Dmk3 files as well and there were no real surprises there, however the support for full tethering has been improved which was one of the earlier problems with the initial release of Capture One 7.0.

Adding support for the FujiFilm file format seemed to be a top priority by Phase One and this is certainly welcome considering the detail smearing that seems to plague any processor that seems to use the traditional processing on the FujiFilm files.

With this new player on the game, we now have all but DxO Optics as major raw processing engines that fully support the format, however rumour has it that Adobe is working on a new ACR 7.3 that will introduce some improvements to the X-Pro1 and X-E1 files in the coming months.

Regardless, the results speak for themselves. I found that Capture One not only improves in details, but also prevents some colour smearing which seems to be another issue in the Lightroom files (look especially at the log on the lower left where the log has lost a lot of wood grain details).

The dynamic range controls have also been improved from Capture One 6 to Capture One 7 which is a big upgrade, but also in comparison to Adobe Lightroom seems to have less clipping and noise issues when pushing those functions to extremes.

Now not everything is perfect here. There's still issues with Capture One and the details. Moire seems to be an issue that causes an unusual maze like pattern to appear in specific textures and still some smearing of details happens. However the great news is that it smears at a much higher detail rate over Adobe's implementation of these files.

I discussed the issues with Phase One over the past couple of weeks and have been sharing my own findings, and one of the simple ways to combat this issue is to turn off the Details slider in Noise Reduction Advanced (or reduce this). This seemed to correct for some of the smearing of details that is set by default.

I'm hopeful these minor issues will be resolved in the next version of Capture One, but for now, it's very nice to have a professional RAW processor that at leasts matches the output quality of the JPG files out of camera, with far more flexibility found in RAW processing.


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Billingham Hadley Pro with Fujifilm's X-Pro 1 | Jon Adair

Billingham Hadley Pro with Fujifilm's X-Pro 1 | Jon Adair | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


It’s been over a year since I took delivery of my Billingham Hadley Pro. In that time, I’ve acquired a completely different camera system than the Canon 5D Mark II that I started out with: Fujifilm’s fantastic X-Pro 1, complete with the 18mm, 35mm, 60mm and 18-55mm zoom. Read on to find out how I use my Hadley Pro with the X-Pro 1. While the Hadley Pro was great with the 5D, it is simply perfect for the X-Pro 1. The body plus all four lenses, spare batteries, filter and lens pen all fit without the bag being full, leaving space for a few more small accessories and even an iPad mini. With everything in place, there is still space to work with this bag – changing lenses and batteries is no problem. My setup is to have the 60mm lens beneath the 18 on the left hand side with one of the small dividers that Billingham provides to separate them. I use the 60mm far less often than the other lenses as it’s quite slow to focus (but is incredibly sharp). In the central space, I have the 35mm (my favourite of the 4 lenses) and in the right hand side is the X-Pro 1 body with the 18-55mm lens mounted. The iPad mini fits comfortably in the space between the inner padding and the front left pocket. The batteries, filters, memory card and lens pen all fit happily in the two front pockets, leaving plenty of space for a few other accessories.

 

Overall, the Billingham Hadley Pro works fantastically well for this type of setup, as well as for much larger cameras. I can’t recommend it enough if you’re looking for a classically styled, extremely high quality, buy-it-once camera bag.

 


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Fuji XP1 and 35mm 1.4 ... Kills The Fuji XT1...) for Me! | Streetshooter

Fuji XP1 and 35mm 1.4 ... Kills The Fuji XT1...) for Me! |  Streetshooter | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

Let me start by saying that some of this was written yesterday and some of it today. Eh…who cares…. I had to get my Dreamcatcher stuff posted first because of such high public demand. Just kidding but not really. These images sell more than anything else from my artsy fartsy collection. These were all made with the XP1 and the 35mm 1.4. It’s a chore for me because I don’t like the 50mm FOV but yet with the XP1….it’s very natural. I use the OVF 90% of the time and the screen the rest and of course somewhere in my demented mathematical equation, the EVF works in. So there’s much talk about the new kid on the block. Oh yeah…it’s all over the net and all over the world. The Fuji XT1 is going to break records. I don’t know which records but I’m told big stuff…wait and see. Well….here in Northeast Philly on Montour Street, in the back room that’s converted to an office but nobody works in it just me and it ain’t work if you love it but anyway…..here…the XT1 will never make an entrance. It’s shunned and not allowed to make a presence. Andre’ the XP1 and Ding the XE1 have decided that …we doin’ need no stinking camera with a center mounted evf that looks like a SLR from the days long gone but they ain’t long gone cause many still like that form but here …. we don’t! .....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Photography Gear News
Scoop.it!

Fuji x100s Follow Up Review :: Life Without DSLRs

Fuji x100s Follow Up Review :: Life Without DSLRs | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it
I have been DSLR free for about two months and all is well. During the past two months I’ve been to Cuba, New York (x2), and Arizona. I feel I have hit just about every type, and kind, of job I do and my little Fujis have performed flawlessly.

Via Philippe Gassmann
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Fujifilm XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 lens | Tom Grill

Fujifilm XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 lens | Tom Grill | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

Conclusion:

Looks like Fuji produced another winner with the 55-200mm for its line of zoom lenses. It shows true professional qualities: no distortion, solid build, high resolution, image stabilization, and quick focus. This is a lot for a lens with a $699 price tag, much better than most zooms I have tested in this price range, and even better than some costing several times as much....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

The trinity: Fujifilm X-Pro1 vs. X-E1 vs. X100 (Part 2) - Autofocus | Alexander Sasha Starcevic

The trinity: Fujifilm X-Pro1 vs. X-E1 vs. X100 (Part 2) - Autofocus | Alexander Sasha Starcevic | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


It took a while for my second post in my comparison. The last couple of days have been busy. I've had the chance to shoot the three cameras at some social events here and there - running into many low-light situations. So my next point of comparison is:

Autofocus:
I love the way all three cameras look and handle with all those external controls. And I love the excellent lenses - particularly the Fujinon 35mm 1.4. However, I am again and again frustrated by the performance of the autofocus. From my experience, there is no difference between the Fujifilm X-E1 and the X-Pro1 in terms of autofocus performance with the latest firmware on both cameras. Similar findings have been made elsewhere. Autofocus struggles in low light and with backlit subjects. I came from using manual lenses on a Sony Nex-7, so I am not a "spoiled" DLSR-user, but I somehow feel I am missing much more shots with the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 than with manual focussing on the Nex-7 (using focus peaking). I had several situations where the AF (slowly) hunted and my subjects were getting impatient. Of course I am really talking low-light here - shooting around ISO 1600 to 6400 with the lens at 1.4. Quite surprisingly, my impression is that the Fujifilm X100 actually seems to struggle less with autofocus than the other cameras (comparing those with the 35mm 1.4). Maybe the reason is just that the X100 needs to move less glass, so hunting is possibly quicker. Nevertheless, I felt less frustrated with the X100 than with the other two cameras. I would be very interested hearing other peoples thoughts on this.

From the point of view of autofocus performance, I would definitely keep the X100, because the main purpose of that camera (to me) is that it can always with me. For such a camera, I don't expect lightning fast AF performance. However, I would expect a little more from the X-Pro1 and the X-E1.

Autofocus for me is really the one reason that sometimes makes me doubt, whether switching to Fujifilm X system was really the right decision, considering that a small DSLR (e.g. Pentax K-5 II) would just give me much more reliable autofocus. Autofocus is perfectly OK if you shoot outdoors and shoot mainly static or slowly moving subjects. So for one part of my photography this is perfectly OK. However, shooting my children outside, at home or at events is currently another big part of my photography. So I would really like to own a main camera system that can cover both needs......


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Thomas Menk's curator insight, December 19, 2012 12:30 AM

Part1:

 

http://www.fujifilm-x-opinions.net/2012/12/the-fujifilm-x-trinity-fujifilm-x-pro1.html

 

Jim Radcliffe's comment, December 19, 2012 2:19 PM
This has not been my experience with the X-Pro1 and I use all three of the lenses with the 18-55mm arriving tomorrow. I honestly had more AF issues with my (now sold) Canon 5D and 5D MKII.
Nick Lukey's comment, December 19, 2012 4:12 PM
Personally I think the X100 and the X pro are about the same in focus performance. I found that whilst a beautiful camera the real let down was the total kludge of a menu system. Which made any settings changes seriously slow. I'm loving the X Pro, it feels good in the hand and is far easier to operate, the images are stellar.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

How to get the most from the Fuji X-Pro1: Using Capture One and Photoshop | Paul Archer

How to get the most from the Fuji X-Pro1: Using Capture One and Photoshop | Paul Archer | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


So as day 50 feels like an achievement I thought I would use a couple of photos I took today and discuss my process, from taking the photo to uploading it on my blog! I am by no means an accomplished street photographer having only done it since I started this blog, but I thought some people may like an insight into the way I work my images. I will start by posting today’s two images as they were SOOC (straight out of camera) with no adjustments at all. So here they are!

As you can see from the movement between the two images I saw my subject from across the street and approached. I snapped the first shot and incorrectly guessed my range, I could have been closer, the 18mm lens does give you a lot of space, I think sometimes the 35mm would yield me more shots as you can stay further away. As I rounded the corner I fired off another shot. Here I will highlight a mistake, I failed to change my shutter speed from my previous shots in my rush to capture this. This is why they are so dark, although I will say that this high speed shutter helped as I was walking and shooting from the hip. I now shoot all my street photography with the X-Pro1 set to manual focus, effectively setting a focus trap, its usually between 3-4ft. I have found this distance gives the greatest results, especially if I can get my f-stop around 5.6. Another bonus of the X-Pro1 great photos from the ISO range enabling faster shutters and better f-stops. After I was a safe distance from the subject I had a look at the spoils on my screen, I knew instantly i had some images for today’s post. At first glance they may not seem great, especially the first one, but i could see something in there I could pull out! This is where the Fuji X-Pro1 file quality really helps. You need the right tools for the job and I always use Capture One Pro, it has its frustrations and yes it does crash a lot but its worth your patience. The process engine is superior to that of Adobe Lightroom in my opinion. I have worked for the last 6/7 years retouching and assisting on the sets of huge advertising campaigns and have never seen or heard of anyone using LR, Capture One would appear to be the industry standard alongside Apple and Eizo products. So from here I get my RAW files into Capture One and begin to see where they want to go and how far I can push and pull them. I would usually process out a file really flat and neutrally balanced and I always disable sharpening too as find it damages the file quality. I will share with you the settings I applied to the shots, I took them in the direction I wanted to go, nothing complicated at all, just exposure adjustment, contrast and desaturation. Keeping it simple seems to work for me! ....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Walking around town taking pictures | Karim Haddad

Walking around town taking pictures | Karim Haddad | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

 

It’s not something I’m used to doing. But every now and then, it’s good to get out of your comfort zone. Most of my photography so far has been rooted in travel. I’ve taken quite a few pictures in the DMV, but the majority of them have been urban landscapes near tourist spots. I took my new Fuji out with my 5D recently to the Lincoln Memorial. Both performed splendidly, but there was something special about the look of my Fuji photos, even the ones that weren’t necessarily  the best of the shoot. I can’t wait to take my new camera with me on a trip overseas. Although the X-Pro1 is not pocket size, it’s a lot easier to carry around with than a dSLR. Even after I buy new lenses, I can still carry the whole kit around in a small bag. It also makes me want to take pictures of the most mundane things in my neighborhood that I hadn’t bothered to look twice at before. I’ve started to look around more. I’m not a street photographer by nature, but I can see myself moving further in that direction. It’s different. Usually I like to take my time composing shots and exerting as much control as possible. On the streets you have to react quickly and you have very little control over anything. It’s not just about shooting in the streets…especially not walls and windows. It’s about shooting anywhere in public, anywhere that gives a sense of what life might be like in that time and place. One of the best places for that is any city’s public transport system. But for those used to framing photos without people in them, this can all be quite a challenge sometimes. Getting shots of people is tougher than you might think. First and foremost, you need to know your camera – using it should be second nature, as if it was a part of your body. Luckily, the X-Pro1 helps with that. It’s only big draw back is the clumsy focal point selection system. Framing shots and getting them in focus can be difficult when you need to move fast. I need to work on my stealth, so I can do my thing without coming off as a weirdo. I don’t know whether to smile more, or focus on discretion. The key to taking pictures of people publicly is doing so smoothly. Whether your shooting faces or silhouettes, you need to be like a shadow in the corner. Ideally, you don’t want your subject to notice until it’s too late. But stealth isn’t the only challenge. Movement can also stand between the shooter and the shot he seeks.You can be walking down the street and notice the perfect shot in your peripheral; by the time you get your camera up and fram your shot, it’s either too later or you’ve blown your cover. Other times, your subject is moving in a way that makes it difficult to get the shot. Every now and then you have no control over your motion, like when you’re in a moving vehicle. Timing becomes crucial. One of the funnest things about shooting in the streets is the unexpected result. Any shot that conveys the feeling of the moment is usually a keeper (at least in the eyes of the photographer). Not all memorable shots are perfectly framed or well focused. A close up candid of an old wrinkly face is nice, but sometimes a more abstract shot can be just as powerful, especially when it tells a story… no matter how vague........


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

And So It Begins: Two Weeks With The X-Pro1 | Jeffery Saddoris

And So It Begins: Two Weeks With The X-Pro1 | Jeffery Saddoris | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


As you know if you listen to On Taking Pictures (and if you don’t, now is a perfect time to start), I had been looking for a new camera since I sold my Nikon D300 several months ago. What I’ve realized, is that it wasn’t just a new camera that I was looking for, but rather a renewed connection to and excitement for making pictures. I started with photography in high school at a time when the only way to learn photography was with film. Actually, we had to work up to film, starting instead with photograms, which, looking back, were a wonderful introduction to the medium. A blank sheet of paper, a few leaves or twigs and light; then it was into the darkroom to see the magic. Bathed in the amber glow of the safelights that would become my second home for years to come, I will never forget seeing the image appear before me in the tray of developer. Alchemy. For me, beginning in the darkroom bound me to photography as a process, rather than merely an outcome, something that I think has been lost to a large degree with the advent of digital.

 

Going back to move forward.

 

I had looked at all of the DSLR offerings in my price range, but nothing really impressed me. Originally, I had sold my D300 in anticipation of getting the D600. Unfortunately, once I actually got a chance to play with one, it just felt like a full-frame D7000, not that there’s anything wrong with that, in fact Nikki does gorgeous work with hers, it just didn’t feel like what I was after. A friend suggested the Fuji X-E1, which, on paper, looked very interesting. The Fuji X-series cameras have fantastic sensors, tack sharp lenses and vintage-inspired styling that really appealed to me. After reading far too many reviews and pixel-peeping far too many photographs (not to mention multiple “should I?” or “shouldn’t I?” conversations with Bill and Nikki), I ordered an X-E1 with the 35mm f/1.4 and the 18-55mm f/2.8 from B+H. A few days later, I opened the package like a four-year-old on Christmas. Thankfully, there was a little charge on the battery, so I popped on the 18-55mm and started snapping away around my apartment. I liked the styling of the camera straight away, though, if I’m being honest, it did feel a little plasticky; not flimsy, but just not as solid as I was expecting, based on the look of it. The body also felt a little small to me; small enough that my pinky dragged across the baseplate, which I didn’t like. Weight and ergonomics aside, the image quality is gorgeous. The JPGs straight out of camera are clean, sharp and, depending on what Film Simulation mode you use, vibrant, smooth, punchy or dramatic. Unfortunately, the unit that I received was defective, only locking focus about 30-40% of the time. At first I thought it was just me or one of the focusing quirks that I had read about that affected both the X-E1 and it’s big brother, the X-Pro1 (XP1). But, apparently, this was not the case. Repeated tests on a tripod under constant light with stationary subjects yielded wildly inconsistent results, both in focus and in metering. So, back it went. I was hesitant to simply get another X-E1 for several reasons, so I decided to have a look at the XP1. I think I knew the moment I looked through the viewfinder (and heard the shutter sound) that it would be my next camera.....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

A cold crisp light | Montreal. Winter. X-Pro1. | Patrick La Roque

A cold crisp light | Montreal. Winter. X-Pro1. |  Patrick La Roque | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Montreal winters aren't just cold: they tend to throw humidity into the mix as well. And that's a much different kind of cold, one that seeps in and freezes your bones to their very core no matter what you do. It's like being pushed into a pool of ice water. And when the wind joins in on the party, well...

This week is like that. Biting. I've been in the city for the past two days waiting on some test prints for an upcoming project and ended up with some hours to kill. Needless to say I haven't really felt like aimlessly roaming the streets with my camera, waiting for the shot; it's been more of a sit in a café and drink coffee kinda mood. But February is a peculiar month. It brings back a different kind of sunlight behind all that cold, a teasing warmth, as though it's trying to let us know this arctic air won't be around forever; almost hinting at spring. If you can find a sheltered spot filled with sunshine and close your eyes, you can almost imagine it, you can almost taste those warmer days ahead. When I was a kid my parents would even build a "snow fort" in the backyard around this time of year; just two big mountains of snow pushed against the house to shield us against the wind. On weekends they'd lounge in there on lawn chairs, their faces up to the sun as though they were on a beach, chilling — literally. Filling up on vitamin D.  In a lot of ways the light at this time of year reminds me of Southern France, of Nice specifically. It's like this huge unrelenting spotlight that makes colours pop like crazy, a few hours each day. And since it stays a bit lower in the sky, it creates slightly more angular shadows than your usual awful midday sun. I didn't spend a lot of time shooting, admittedly. Maybe 45 minutes give or take. I'm not that crazy. But I do love the colour and the crispness of these images. All shot with the X-Pro1 and 35mm f/1.4 at ISO 200, using a mix of Pro Neg Lo/Hi and Velvia simulations....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Liverpool Sunrises with the Fuji X-Pro 1 | Liverpool Photographer

Liverpool Sunrises with the Fuji X-Pro 1 | Liverpool Photographer | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


For me, taking the time to watch the sunrise is a spirit-lifting experience in itself.  Every day is new, untold and full of possibilities.  To be out there facing that iconic view, seeing the day being born out of the darkness and lighting up the city where I’ve spent my entire life is quite an evocative thing to witness. That said, it’s not always such a calming experience because as the sun rises and its rays dance over the clouds, occasionally, and perhaps only for a few fleeting seconds, the sunlight skims the atmosphere at just the right angles and your eyes are treated to a fantastic explosion of colour.  It’s at those times when my sleepy mind is suddenly very alert and I’m most likely darting between two cameras I’ve got set up on tripods making sure their shutters are firing and the exposures are looking good.  And when I see those rear LCD previews glowing with same radiance, well, that’s when I don’t mind losing a bit of sleep so much. My usual kit for these sunrise shoots has been a Nikon D700, Nikon 24-70mm with an assortment of Lee filters (ND grads and a Big Stopper), a Fuji X-Pro 1 with the 35mm and 18-55mm XF lens and B&W 10-stop filter.  Let’s not forget the many layers of warm clothing, a flask of something hot and many hours to stand around waiting! The 4-year old D700 still has a place in my heart despite higher resolution offerings from younger siblings and rivals.  It’s reliable and predictable in so much as I know I can get extremely satisfying results from it.  Like a faithful old dog who knows where my favourite slippers, newspaper and pipe are. The Fuji X-Pro 1 on the other hand is still a very new camera, fashioned with classic and retro lines, but underneath its cool, dark exterior lies technology  which would make the Borg salivate.  The X-Trans sensor is innovative with its lack of anti-aliasing filter and funky colour array filter, but software companies have had decades to perfect their algorithms to render ‘traditional’ Bayer pattern sensor data so it’s no surprise there are still improvements to be had.  It’s not all bad news, though, and the X-Pro 1 still has a legion of fans with me being one of them.  Personally, I don’t find the raws that bad when processed in Lightroom.  Certainly, not as bad as some might claim. The styling is great, the handling is great, the autofocus is decent for a contrast detection based system, the sensor is relatively huge for such a small body and in my opinion packs just the right number of megapixels (16).  Crucially, the lenses are excellent (aherm, Sony) which makes the XF system such a great one.  To me, great lenses are the foundation of any system because they’re the pieces of equipment you carry over from one body to the next.  The JPG processing in-camera is good, but I’m still going to continue shooting raw because that leaves me the option of processing in-camera afterwards and because I believe raw support will improve. With all that said, what matters is the end result and whether I like it. I do. Very much so.


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

A New Toy | Gene Lowinger

A New Toy | Gene Lowinger | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Oh goody! I just received my Fujinon 14mm f2.8 lens today. I'd been waiting for it since September. Hopefully, if the temperature is not too brutal for my old bones, I'll get out and shoot with it this weekend. When I was shooting film with my Leica M6 my favorite lens to use was the Leica 21mm, the equivalent to the Fuji lens in focal length. So I'm going to have a chance to dig deep into my bag of tricks (that's a euphemism for trying to remember old techniques). We shall see.....

Both these shots were made with the 18-55mm zoom lens. I would like to have been able to zoom out wider for the first image, but street happens so fast that's not always possible. Would have been a much better shot with some space at the top of the frame. But I still like her expression. I caught this gentleman with the very cool beard on 34th Street just after leaving a critique session at B&H Photo. There's just something about facial hair, whether on a man or woman, that's so much fun to shoot.


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Fujifilm’s X-PRO 1 – In the Studio | Joel Addams

Fujifilm’s X-PRO 1 – In the Studio | Joel Addams | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


I have enjoyed the Fujifilm X-PRO 1 more than I anticipated. After having it hang out in my bag for a few months, thinking that it was my “fun” camera that I would pull out when I wanted to go to dinner and just have something small, I slowly started incorporating it into daily use, both on the street and then in the studio. I was pretty blown away by the very aperture (f/1.4) on the 35 mm lens, and I knew that this lens was highly regarded among the reviews on all the major techie sites. But for the price, (now $1399 for the body and still $599 for one of these lenses), I believe the X-PRO 1 (or X E1) with a 35 mm or 60 mm lens to be one of the best deals for a very wide aperture on a professional APS-C sensor. The results have been phenomenal for me, and now I think of the X-PRO 1 as less of a “fun” camera and more of a serious camera. In fact, I look for opportunities to use it. (But wait, aren’t you supposed to look more professional with bulkier, heavier cameras in your bag? Don’t you want to be the guy to show up at the most famous location with the longest lens?) Whatever floats your boat. If you hand me a metal, well built camera with a killer lens and sensor, I will suddenly start planning my next backpacking trip or walk across Europe around it. Thank you, Fujifilm. And by the way, if you put a full frame sensor in one in the future, I will buy that one, too....


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

How to win and loose the 2012 National Geographic Photo Contest with a Fuji X PRO-1 | Harry Fisch

How to win and loose the 2012 National Geographic Photo Contest with a Fuji X PRO-1 | Harry Fisch | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


For a short period of time, one week perhaps, I have felt the pleasure and sorrow of being the winner of the 2012 National Geographic Photo contest and being later disqualified.If you are interested here is the story: "National Geographic, how I won and lost the contest in less than one second"

 
In any case this proves that the FUJI X-pro 1 is more than capable of reaching all kind of high summits in the photographic world.

This photograph was taken at Asi Gaht, Varanasi, more or less 5:45 am. I usually stay next to this precise Gaht when in Varanasi. I just had finished my leading my last expedition to India with Nomad Photo Expedition. This said, I obviously know the place :-) . The extraordinary thing about the ghats is their tremendous transformation which lies on the level of the Ganges. On this opportunity - one month ago- the level was low and, unfortunately, the image, from the steps of the Gaht, was not very pleasant: mud, garbage, etc... I decided to go down, next to the Ganges.

Even with the  XPRO-1 outstanding low light performance, I did not want to risk the picture and decided not to go beyond 2.500 ISO. This shot was done with the 18mm (27 mm equivalent) 1/8th of a second , 2.0 f.  As you will surely understand, the low speed made the things even more difficult. As well as the mixture of lights: I had to put together threee sources of light, a moving scenario and all this with only twenty minutes of "good" lighting. My main concern was to decide on the exposure. In theory I should have set everything to a right hand side histogram to prevent the grain should I need to work later on the picture with LR or PS. My decision was -and I think that it was, for once, the right one- to underexpose (you do not have time for a serious measuring) two stops less than what my "multi-I don't knowwhat " exposure setting was telling me, in order to prevent as much overexposure on the candle lights as possible. I knew that the candles would be out of range if I did not underexpose.  The different sources of light were a bit tricky: candels, lamps from a nearby street, the night. And the fog, wich is also an issue as it reflects the light, normally fools the meter readings which will, again underexpose. I keep visiting the Gaht each morning, early in the morning and at dawn, with my camera, a Fuji X-pro1, and two prime lenses: a 18 mm  and the 35 mm. I feel more at ease with the wide. 

  At this early time, before dawn, you have barely time for, perhaps, four to five different framings as the light that I want lasts for no more than 20 minutes. It is quite stressing to decide the setting depending on the things that are happening around you: lights, candles, people, specially knowing  that there is not much time left and everything will disappear as people move and change position continuously.

On this opportunity, suddenly, a big group of pilgrims, obviously coming from villages (they are more prone to be photographed) came into the Gaht. I literally run to fight for my position in the middle of the mass. I have lately discovered that the " I am a professional photographer" approach works far better than the "shy" approach: cameras, tripods, lens bags, an Indiana Jones hat :-) . With the poor light and the mass, people have little time to care about me: they came to Varanasi for their ritual morning bath, they are not in the mood of loosing their time arguing or discussing with an -obvious- foreigner in disguise (disguised as a photographer). All this to advance that I was well before the "final" shot at the place. Probably at 5:00 am for the "final" shot taken at 5:45 am.

This was possibly the 6th shot in the same position. I set the tripod, decided on the frame and light and, using my mechanical shooter, (Fuji Xpro1 does not have an electronic shooter !), and not looking through the camera, (as in old good time) I shoot..


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Thomas Menk's curator insight, January 9, 2013 1:07 AM

Harry Fisch, polyglot and originally a lawyer and businessman, has been a photographer for more years than he cares to remember. He has photographically documented more than 27 countries through which he has traveled , concentrating since 2002, on Asia, especially Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Nepal and India.

Harry Fisch's comment, January 9, 2013 7:36 AM
Wow ! Looks great on your site :-)