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Iceland with the Fuji XE1 / Fuji Travel Photography | Colin Nicholls

Iceland with the Fuji XE1 / Fuji Travel Photography | Colin Nicholls | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

At last count I had visited Iceland a total of three times, the first I was an amature photographer and went with a Nikon D60 + 18-105 lens, the second I had got better and went with a D90 +24/50/135 lenses, the last time was after I fell for Fuji and went with 2 XE1's; 8mm, 18mm, 35mm, 60mm and 50-230mm lenses. I've blogged about my time in Iceland before but have decided to put this post together to keep it all in one place and show you some photography of this awesome place! One thing that keeps me coming back to Iceland is the quick changing nature of the weather and the raw unspoilt landscapes that greet you around every bend, as this was my third time out I was very much ready for what would be in store and some very good ideas of places I wanted to visit. All the photos here were shot on 2 Fuji XE-1's the size and weight of these cameras make them great for travel and the image quality is just incredible, at no point did I feel the need for anything more that the gear I had and would be happy to travel anywhere in the world with just this small bag of gear.......

 

 


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FUJIFILM XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS | Yodobashi

FUJIFILM XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS  | Yodobashi | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

Google Translater (JP -> ENG)

XF lens Fujifilm's whole body. This is why a standard range zoom and prime lenses some have been line-up so far, telephoto zoom system was released finally. Because it had been published previously in the lens roadmap Fujifilm-provided, of course, but also for everyone currently under consideration, all of you are using the X-Series feel lens that have been waiting for that me appeared or would not be. Lens attractive does have XF lens, but in the scene you want drawn to the subject at hand, it was the place I want a telephoto system still. Has a zoom range of 305mm from 84mm in 35mm format, because it is a spec of camera shake correction function with the 4.5 stage of Furthermore, it can you make it possible to shoot without being bound to the situation and time zone more than ever will. I did what you said I tried shooting in various conditions this time, depiction with the three-dimensional impression and dense and the strength of the backlight to the expected. It is in the presence of slightly larger certainly in the XF lineup of lenses, but also have this capability, and much more compact compared to the lens of the same class of single-lens reflex. I can say us to enable new shooting style, and reliable lens.


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Thomas Menk's curator insight, June 11, 2013 5:28 AM

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http://bit.ly/18rjnss

 

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The trinity: Fujifilm X-Pro1 vs. X-E1 vs. X100 (Part 2) - Autofocus | Alexander Sasha Starcevic

The trinity: Fujifilm X-Pro1 vs. X-E1 vs. X100 (Part 2) - Autofocus | Alexander Sasha Starcevic | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


It took a while for my second post in my comparison. The last couple of days have been busy. I've had the chance to shoot the three cameras at some social events here and there - running into many low-light situations. So my next point of comparison is:

Autofocus:
I love the way all three cameras look and handle with all those external controls. And I love the excellent lenses - particularly the Fujinon 35mm 1.4. However, I am again and again frustrated by the performance of the autofocus. From my experience, there is no difference between the Fujifilm X-E1 and the X-Pro1 in terms of autofocus performance with the latest firmware on both cameras. Similar findings have been made elsewhere. Autofocus struggles in low light and with backlit subjects. I came from using manual lenses on a Sony Nex-7, so I am not a "spoiled" DLSR-user, but I somehow feel I am missing much more shots with the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 than with manual focussing on the Nex-7 (using focus peaking). I had several situations where the AF (slowly) hunted and my subjects were getting impatient. Of course I am really talking low-light here - shooting around ISO 1600 to 6400 with the lens at 1.4. Quite surprisingly, my impression is that the Fujifilm X100 actually seems to struggle less with autofocus than the other cameras (comparing those with the 35mm 1.4). Maybe the reason is just that the X100 needs to move less glass, so hunting is possibly quicker. Nevertheless, I felt less frustrated with the X100 than with the other two cameras. I would be very interested hearing other peoples thoughts on this.

From the point of view of autofocus performance, I would definitely keep the X100, because the main purpose of that camera (to me) is that it can always with me. For such a camera, I don't expect lightning fast AF performance. However, I would expect a little more from the X-Pro1 and the X-E1.

Autofocus for me is really the one reason that sometimes makes me doubt, whether switching to Fujifilm X system was really the right decision, considering that a small DSLR (e.g. Pentax K-5 II) would just give me much more reliable autofocus. Autofocus is perfectly OK if you shoot outdoors and shoot mainly static or slowly moving subjects. So for one part of my photography this is perfectly OK. However, shooting my children outside, at home or at events is currently another big part of my photography. So I would really like to own a main camera system that can cover both needs......


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Thomas Menk's curator insight, December 19, 2012 3:30 AM

Part1:

 

http://www.fujifilm-x-opinions.net/2012/12/the-fujifilm-x-trinity-fujifilm-x-pro1.html

 

Jim Radcliffe's comment, December 19, 2012 5:19 PM
This has not been my experience with the X-Pro1 and I use all three of the lenses with the 18-55mm arriving tomorrow. I honestly had more AF issues with my (now sold) Canon 5D and 5D MKII.
Nick Lukey's comment, December 19, 2012 7:12 PM
Personally I think the X100 and the X pro are about the same in focus performance. I found that whilst a beautiful camera the real let down was the total kludge of a menu system. Which made any settings changes seriously slow. I'm loving the X Pro, it feels good in the hand and is far easier to operate, the images are stellar.
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A day in Georgetown with the Fuji X-E1 | Mark Hilliard

A day in Georgetown with the Fuji X-E1 | Mark Hilliard | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


I spent last Sunday in Georgetown, SC.  I had a gallery change out in a gallery that I am a member of (Co-Op).  The change out only took about an hour so I decided to take the rest of the day to scout new locations and just shoot! There are several places there that I love to visit.  As you drive North on Front Street out of the Down Town area you start passing several side streets on the right.  Each of these leads to a marina with several Shrimp Boats (and in 1 case many!).  I like walking around the docks and working each group of boats then moving in closer and doing detail images. These vessels are not long to be with us so if you have the chance to visit and photograph them you should youmake it a priority to do so! The choice between Color and B&W is a tough one for most photographers.  For me, I like B&W much better but I will porcess both for each and every image that I take.  So I will have the choice as to what I eventually use readily on hand! I do not normally shoot intentional lens flair but for this image I composed the image with it in mind! This generated such a perfect series of light beams that they were visible in front of the boats cabin door! Again, the choice between Color and B&W was a no brainer for me! ....


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Fujifilm X-E1: Black Reflective Product Photography | Mark Garbowski

Fujifilm X-E1: Black Reflective Product Photography | Mark Garbowski | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


A few weeks ago I saw a blog post tutorial that showed how to create black background with a reflective photo effect using a clear plate of glass and a black sheet.  The simple method was to put your subject on the glass, put the black sheet behind them both, shoot slightly from above, and when the flash light hit everything it would turn the clear glass into a reflective element that appeared solid black as it reflected both the subject and the black sheet behind it. The problem was I don’t have any panes of glass lying around. I was thinking of going to a glazier to get a small piece made for me so I could try this but as I googled around I discovered another option: black plexiglass acrylic sheets.  I was able to buy a 24″ x 48″ sheet that is 1/4 inch thick for $44, and I don’t think I could get a piece of glass that size for that little, and this weighs less. It arrived last week and I played with it last weekend, and was rather pleased with the results. I still used a black sheet in the background to minimize the chance that additional reflections would interfere with the clean surface. I had one Speedlight on a stand shooting through an umbrella, and metered using TTL auto settings. I had my camera on Aperture priority so I could control depth of field, and even at f/11 I see that it’s probably not broad enough to get the entire subject in focus so when I go back to this method I will adjust. Depending on the subject, I found that I would need to adjust the TTL metering sometimes within the range of +1.= to -1.0, but an even 0.0 usually came out right. The biggest issue was dust. If you try doing this I highly recommend getting a good dust cloth. The plastic company also recommend a specific cleaning agent I will look into. But don’t ignore that your subject will also have dust on it. In the shot above I was able to make most of the dust that accumulated on the plastic surface  disappear using a simple black brush in Photoshop, but removing dust spots from the subject is harder – I managed to get about half of the but cannot do much about the rest. I would recommend carefully cleaning everything before you start, and several times along the way on a long shoot. As I look at the images I took over the course of maybe an hour, there is visibly more dust on the plastic at the end of the session than there was at the beginning.  Unless you are doing your shoot in a technological Clean Room where they make computer chips or something similar, I think it is likely that having a dust fee surface when you start will be no guarantor of a dust free surface when you are done. Finally, my subject above is my fairly new Fujifilm X-E1, which is an absolutely gorgeous camera. Here it is sporting the 35mm f/1.4 Prime Lens and original strap. I recently sold my Micro Four-Thirds Gear to switch over to the Fuji system.  Explaining that decision would require doubling the length of this post, so I will defer it to another day, but for now I’ll just make it clear that I still love the Micro 4/3s system and note that it could very well be the right solution for you....


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Fujifilm XE1 Review | Kale J. Friesen

 

I joined the Fujifilm X-Photographers team at the beginning of 2013 so I decided it would be great do a quick hands on review, and talk about the things I love and don't love about the Fujifilm X-E1. Although it's not the perfect camera there are a lot of things that make this camera great for users that want good photographs, retro/clean styling and a variety of lenses to invest in.


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Thomas Menk's curator insight, February 15, 2013 3:37 AM

Visit Kale´s website on:
www.kalejf.com/

 

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The Fuji X-E1 is awesome | Brian T. Adams

The Fuji X-E1 is awesome | Brian T. Adams | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


So, a little bit about myself… I became a camera enthusiast about one year ago. What I mean by this is I, unwittingly, purchased my first DSLR. Mostly, because I thought this is what you had to do if you wanted to get into digital photography and come up with “awesome” results. Aside from the past year, my photography experience is limited to my junior and senior years of high school some 18 years ago or so. While I did learn how to develop film and make prints – which were pretty rough – my efforts were mostly focused on shenanigans. Obviously, a lot has changed in nearly two decades of technological advancement and digital post processing. My point: I was the perfect consumer that fell right into the huge DSLR marketing trap. And, man, did I drop some of my hard-earned dough on DSLR what-have-you.

Digital Single Lens Reflex cameras certainly have their place in the world. I’ll never contest that. In fact I still love mine. However, for me, something wasn’t quite right. I genuinely don’t like carrying mine around with me in public. It’s huge, heavy, and I feel like I stick out like a sore thumb with it. In contrast, one of the reasons I bought it in the first place was to capture those seemingly random moments in life when you think to yourself “man, I wish I had a camera right now.” The other reason I bought it was in an attempt to get into landscape photography…which has proven to be significantly harder than I expected. I suppose that’s part of a different story, though. Either way, if I wasn’t on a planned photo outing, the camera stayed at home. I quickly realized I was at least partially defeating the purpose of getting it in the first place. Then I found stevehuffphoto.com. Fast forward several months, and I am now the proud owner of the Fuji X-E1 teamed up with the Fuji 35mm F1.4. Sure, I’d like to score a Leica M9 or the new RX-1 but the cost was just too unreasonable for me. A couple of weeks ago, my fiancé and I returned from a week and a half long road trip pulling our vintage Airstream trailer up and down the Northern California Coast. It turns out that trailer camping in the winter is barely fun. However, it gave me a chance to put my new rig to the test. Please don’t confuse this write-up as a technically based review of any sort. It isn’t. I aim to let everybody know what my experience with it has been like thus far. A quick recap: my camera experience is limited to approximately one year of DSLR work, much of which has been on the tripod. The X-E1 is the first camera of its kind that I’ve ever used. Here goes…

Compared to a DSLR, the X-E1 is tiny. I have girl hands and I still found myself fumbling around with it at first. I quickly got over this and, now, really like its ergonomics. Plus, I’d trade discreetness for a little fumbling any day of the week. Even still, I still sometimes accidentally end up pressing the AE-L/AE-F and Q buttons from time to time being that they’re located right where my thumb naturally ends up…not a big deal though. The X-E1 is very easy to use. The menus seem intuitive and straight forward and I can get into them and out again quickly without feeling like smashing the camera to bits because I forgot where a setting was located. Obviously, one of my biggest frustrations with the DSLR experience is all the menus and settings and adjustments and blah, blah, blah…sometimes I just want to take pictures. The X-E1 allows me to do exactly this. The only thing I typically adjust on it is aperture, ISO (I’ve assigned ISO to the FN button), and exposure compensation. Side note: I LOVE the little knob Fuji uses for exposure comp. I’m sure this isn’t exclusive to Fuji, but it’s the first time I’ve seen it. Perfect. I’ve tried auto ISO a few times, but in low light it tends to try to make the shutter speed 1/50 sec and then just adjust ISO around this. For 50mm focal length equivalent, this speed is marginal for those of us with shaky hands. So, I tend to sacrifice higher ISO to get a higher shutter speed. This just means I need to be paying attention to shutter speed. This was actually a challenge for me since I’m used to shooting almost exclusively at wide angles where you can get away with slower shutter speeds, especially if you’ve got Image Stabilization. Needless to say, I botched several shots do to slowish shutter speeds. My fault, not the camera’s.....


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Hotel New York in Rotterdam, The netherlands | René Mossinkoff

Hotel New York in Rotterdam, The netherlands | René Mossinkoff | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Another series, during the same weekend as the China Light event.

This hotel is a beauty and a good place to test the X-E1.....


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Review: Updated: Fuji X-E1 | Technology News

Review: Updated: Fuji X-E1 | Technology News | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Verdict

Overall, the Fuji X-E1 is an extremely interesting proposition that we can see being incredibly successful. Combining the fantastic technology of the Fuji X-Pro1 with a more consumer-friendly price and a smaller, more streamlined CSC body will surely appeal to a wide range of people. Adding a new 18-55mm kit lens to the lineup of the X range is also a smart move, which is again likely to appeal to a new crowd looking for something a little more versatile. It’s nice to see that Fuji’s premium quality and build has gone into the design of the kit lens, elevating it far above the realms of the usual bundled optic.


We liked


The improved autofocus speeds that Fuji’s new firmware brings, coupled with the 18-55mm kit lens, make this a fantastic camera to easily take on its DSLR rivals.


We disliked


There’s not many things to dislike about the camera, with just a few small niggles keeping it from perfection. It would be nice to have seen a touchscreen, while the autofocus speed when using other lenses could do with being improved.


Final verdict


The premium end of the compact system camera market is now looking extremely interesting. This new camera competes much more closely with the Olympus OM-D and Sony NEX-7 than the Fuji X-Pro1 was able to. As such, other manufacturers are likely to carefully watch Fuji’s proposition. Currently, Nikon and Canon don’t have anything in this niche segment of the market, while Panasonic’s cameras arguably sit just underneath. It’ll be interesting what kind of responses we see to the camera in the coming year. With the X-E1, Fuji has brought the next evolution of the X series of interchangeable lens cameras. As the system is set to grow in the coming year, we can see this camera appealing to a large group of people.


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Augsburg's comment, February 2, 2013 1:48 PM
Careful, this webpage runs some kind of script that pops up an Amazon webpage. Even when you close the popup, it keeps opening a new one over and over!
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The Fujifilm X-E1 is The One | Rey Spadoni

The Fujifilm X-E1 is The One | Rey Spadoni | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

 

I wanted to like the Fujifilm X-Pro 1 (see my review here).  I really did. The fit and finish.  The metallic heft.  The reminiscent styling.  And the new x-trans sensor mojo with image quality rivaling bigger sensor systems.  They were on to something here with this no anti-aliasing filter wizardry and whether concocted by the pinstripe suit marketing executives or fashioned in the basement by doctorate scientists, no matter.  My eyes didn’t lie.  Me like.

But alas…

Autofocus performance and overall sluggish performance made me think better of it.  And then there were the niggles, like no built-in diopter adjustment capability for these aging eyes.  No easy-on flash for quick fill for shady conditions. So, like Bogart and Bergman, we parted on the misty tarmac.  Ah, what could have been… what could have been…

OK, I’ll stop messing around.  The newest X-mount body from Fujiflm is a dream come true.  It solves just about every problem I encountered on the X-Pro 1 and then, for kicks, goes even further up the tickle-my-fancy meter.  This is the camera I had been waiting for.  This is The One.

Read on for some impressions.

 

The X-E1, available in a very X-Proesque black or more X100-like silver topped finish, is a smaller and lighter body.  I did find the X-Pro to be a bit heavy and oddly tall for my liking.  Most likely because there’s no need to house the mechanics of a full hybrid viewfinder, the X-E1 is squatter and without lens, especially, its lightness gives you the distinct impression that baby brother has been manufactured with a bit more plastic than the Pro version.

 

Did the loss of the nice hybrid viewfinder bother me?  Actually, it didn’t.  Don’t get me wrong, I love shooting with the X100 and you can’t beat having the ability to look through clear glass at the world in front of you.  But the higher resolution electronic version in the X-E1 is wonderful.  Much as been written about lag and it’s clearly not as snappy as the viewfinder in the Olympus OM-D (another camera I love – see here), but it’s more than adequate for my type of shooting.  If you’re someone who moves the camera all about in quick fashion, trying to see and capture what lies in front of you, especially in lower light conditions, then I think there are many more reasons why the X-mount system isn’t the one for you. How about the autofocus?  Much, much improved.  That’s a function of some software updates along with a built in motor within the exceptional, and I mean exceptional, kit lens.  It’s faster and sharper than any other kit lens I’ve used and so it’s almost a shame that Fujifilm had to package this lens with the X-E1 as many reflexively look down their noses at it, thinking, ha… it’s only a kit lens.  Well, look again.  Fast, sharp, and the ability to adjust aperture on the barrel is wonderful.  Manual focus, again because of firmware changes, is actually useful.  The upcoming X cameras have focus peaking and the X100s has a digital split-prism effect.  It would be wonderful if Fujifilm could backward add those features to the X-E1 now that the code is written.  That would make an outstanding camera even better.....


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Thomas Menk's curator insight, January 22, 2013 10:26 AM

2 Guys Photo is a website dedicated to emerging photographers everywhere.  The 2 Guys are Ed and Rey, brothers living in New England (United States) who fell in love with photography as young boys and who have continued to be in love with it since.

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Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS Lens Review | Patrick Leong

Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS Lens Review | Patrick Leong | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

When Fuji announced that they were coming out with the X-Pro1, it got many photographers out there excited because finally, there was a digital camera that reminded them of how cameras use to be built.  The Leica M digitals evoke the same feelings but they also cost a lot more.  The X-Pro1 was a camera that really allowed photographers to take an active role in the photographic process instead of letting the camera do everything for them but for several times less than something like an M9.  Furthermore, the X-Pro1 had many of the same attributes of a traditional rangefinder even though it was in the mirrorless class.  Many thought that just like a traditional rangefinder, only fixed focal length lenses could be used.  Then Fuji surprised us by announcing that they would be creating zoom lenses for the XF Series lineup.  The first of these zoom lenses is the XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R Lens, which is the lens that I have here today for review, and the lens that came with my X-E1 kit. Honestly, even I was a bit surprised when I heard the news that Fuji was coming out with zooms for the X-Pro1/X-E1.  First off, most people who are going to buy a camera like the X-Pro1 or the X-E1 are more interested in fast primes.  I know I was because I grew up with fixed focal lengths.  Optically, they’re just better, faster, and most importantly for a rangefinder type camera, smaller.  But as my interest grew for the Fuji X-E1, I began looking at the price of the new zoom.  If I bought the XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R Lens separately, I would have to cough up almost $700 for it.  However, if I bought it packaged as a kit with the X-E1, I would only be paying about $400 for it.

 

The Fuji X-E1 with XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R lens.

I’m pretty traditional in terms of what I like in photographic equipment, and everyone who knows me knows that I can be pretty stuck in my ways .  Look at my blog.  You’ll see Leica, and Fuji X series cameras, which are all cameras that rely heavily on user input.  I’m not trying to rat on anyone else’s preferences; that’s just my style.  I like these kinds of cameras because they’re basic, and the controls are manual allowing me to fully concentrate on the photo.  I really don’t like electronics getting in my way, and in terms of lenses, I really believe that all you need is a fast prime to take care of 90% of your shots.  For me, the ultimate setup to this day is a Leica M9 with a 50 Summilux ASPH.  So what made me try out this zoom?  Well, for me, the fact that the X-E1 had only an electronic viewfinder bothered me a bit because I like having an OVF.  But the features of the X-E1 got me to take the leap, and buy it so I figured that since I’m giving the EVF a chance, I might as well go for the zoom, and see what I’ve been missing .  Plus, again, the zoom cost me only an extra $400 if I bought the Fuji X-E1 kit, which to me was a great incentive to give the zoom a chance. Did I regret my decision?  No, not at all.  This is one awesome lens, and in my opinion, Fuji shouldn’t label it as a kit lens because that’s very deceiving.  I love using this lens.  Is it perfect?  No but it definitely expands the range, and usefulness of the X-Series system, and gives the X-Series system one more reason to love it.

 


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Capture One 7.0.2 (Support for FujiFilm X-Trans Files) | Terrance Lam

Capture One 7.0.2 (Support for FujiFilm X-Trans Files) | Terrance Lam | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Today Phase One released an update for Capture One to support the FujiFilm X-Trans formats. This includes both the X-Pro1 and the X-E1 cameras.

I've been testing them out the last couple of weeks and been very pleased by the results. Although I'm hesitant to call it perfect (my own workflow still yield slightly better results in resolution) I'm pleased at least to say that there's a professional raw processor that supports the FujiFilm X-format that has the same workflow efficiencies as Adobe Lightroom. It resolves much of the nagging issues that some users complain about using Adobe Camera RAW or Lightroom, and yields the professional and user friendly software of Capture One.

I've also used the latest Capture One (7.0.2) for several weeks with my Canon EOS 5Dmk3 files as well and there were no real surprises there, however the support for full tethering has been improved which was one of the earlier problems with the initial release of Capture One 7.0.

Adding support for the FujiFilm file format seemed to be a top priority by Phase One and this is certainly welcome considering the detail smearing that seems to plague any processor that seems to use the traditional processing on the FujiFilm files.

With this new player on the game, we now have all but DxO Optics as major raw processing engines that fully support the format, however rumour has it that Adobe is working on a new ACR 7.3 that will introduce some improvements to the X-Pro1 and X-E1 files in the coming months.

Regardless, the results speak for themselves. I found that Capture One not only improves in details, but also prevents some colour smearing which seems to be another issue in the Lightroom files (look especially at the log on the lower left where the log has lost a lot of wood grain details).

The dynamic range controls have also been improved from Capture One 6 to Capture One 7 which is a big upgrade, but also in comparison to Adobe Lightroom seems to have less clipping and noise issues when pushing those functions to extremes.

Now not everything is perfect here. There's still issues with Capture One and the details. Moire seems to be an issue that causes an unusual maze like pattern to appear in specific textures and still some smearing of details happens. However the great news is that it smears at a much higher detail rate over Adobe's implementation of these files.

I discussed the issues with Phase One over the past couple of weeks and have been sharing my own findings, and one of the simple ways to combat this issue is to turn off the Details slider in Noise Reduction Advanced (or reduce this). This seemed to correct for some of the smearing of details that is set by default.

I'm hopeful these minor issues will be resolved in the next version of Capture One, but for now, it's very nice to have a professional RAW processor that at leasts matches the output quality of the JPG files out of camera, with far more flexibility found in RAW processing.


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Fuji X-E1 …OMG what have I done!! | Simon Peckham

Fuji X-E1 …OMG what have I done!! | Simon Peckham | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

Yep that’s what thought just at the start of my first pro shoot with the Fuji X-E1.


So, the time came to use my new Fuji X-E1 for the work that it was intended, as some of you know if you read my blog I have recently sold my Nikon DSLR kit and moved to the Fuji X-E1. This was not an easy decision, but having owned and fallen for the fabulous image quality of the Fui X100, I felt I could take a gamble sell the Nikon gear work with the Fuji system. The X-E1 arrived 28th December so I had some time learning the X-E1, it had some new software, menus and setups that needed me to spend some time with the camera. I had an extremely important portrait session of a group of three company directors to a new and chain of Boutique Hotels. So no pressure then !! At the very start of the first few test shots having set up the lighting ready for the head shots I thought Oh no what I have done, I have made a huge mistake I wish I had my D300s in my hand right now and all this worry would disappear ….. Why !. It started with a massive defect visible on the test shots, at first I thought I was picking up a shadow from something in the room, nope, its on the lens then …. Nope ….panic starting to set in …. How did I not see this, I tested with speed-lights in my house, taken dozens of family test shots …why I had I not see this before… Ok it must be the sensor, sure enough taking off the 18-55 lens reveal a large dust particle causing me a minor heart attack 5 mins before some of the most important clients turn up….yeah ok so now your thinking why did I not have a back up camera …. I did it was the Fuji X100 it would have got me through the session but I would have had to make some serious compromises. Ok grabbing my dust blower the offending item was removed, a test shot taken and that warm friendly feeling of relief started to prevent the blood completely draining from my body when the defect had gone from the image…phew! But my worries and woes didn’t stop there… This shoot took place on a building sight ….literally. It was planned for the early evening due to working commitments from me and my clients, therefore but the time we were ready to start taking some “serious shots” it was starting to get dark… ok not normally a worry as I had set up the lighting anyway…but the room was lit only by puny site safety lighting and was very dim and I soon ran into problems with low light focus….Arrrhggg… Not only did the EVF become very grainy due to the dim light it was very difficult to gain focus manually too,thinking quickly I remembered I had thrown in my mains powered continuous ring light into my kit case PHEW stoke of luck…..finding an extension lead I was soon back up and running, but now shooting one handed and partially on the tripod lighting the clients with a combination of speed flash and continuous ring light the other hand in order to nail the auto focus….

 

“STOP” I hear you shouting are you nuts this is your own entire fault … and yep it is. Thinking why I did I not take a breather at this point, set the ring light on stand in front of me and work with manual focus ….. No reason and that’s exactly what I would do if it happens again but with all the adrenalin running, thinking on my feet and needing to make sure the client was happy I carried on regardless and hey I was making progress, so I just keep going.
Its called the swan syndrome and I was in full speed … no one noticed .....

 


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Fuji x100s Follow Up Review :: Life Without DSLRs

Fuji x100s Follow Up Review :: Life Without DSLRs | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it
I have been DSLR free for about two months and all is well. During the past two months I’ve been to Cuba, New York (x2), and Arizona. I feel I have hit just about every type, and kind, of job I do and my little Fujis have performed flawlessly.

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Fuji X-E 1 Camera Review | Craig Litten

Fuji X-E 1 Camera Review | Craig Litten | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


The Fuji X-E1 is the camera that started it all, and ended it all for me. When the Fuji X100 was announced two years ago, I immediately thought that it was the camera that I’d been longing for. It was small and light, housed an ample APS-C image sensor and offered a built-in, fixed 35mm (equivalent) f/2 lens (my favorite focal length). I thought it was perfect, and I was keen to the fact that it was made with metal parts as well as physical dials and levers like cameras of old. At the time though, I had wished that it came in black. Ultimately, I did not buy the Fuji X100 because of all the jumbled reviews, and I began to look elsewhere.....

Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

I started this informal review with the statement: “The Fuji X-E1 is the camera that started it all, and ended it all for me.” The X-E1 (Jan) is the camera that got me into the Fuji X system. I bought it first along with the 18-55 zoom. I’m not really a zoom guy except by necessity, and the flexible 18-55 will be an excellent stand-by lens for me for various assignments. I also bought the XF 18mm f/2 lens along with the XF 35mm f/1.4 lens (a 28mm and a 50mm for all intents and purposes) to carry most of the burden. In other words, the two prime lenses will be the lenses I turn to the most. I have decided that the X-Pro 1 is more suitable for me though, so I bought two X-Pro 1 bodies and sold my X-E1. The deciding factors include the amazing hybrid viewfinder, the larger, more substantial build, the missing flash (I don’t really like flash anyway, and it’s just one more thing to break), the superior rear LCD, the preferable rear command dial, the locking shutter speed dial, and finally, and most importantly, a play button that is in the CORRECT place. The X-E1 is a fine camera with some talents of it’s own, but at the end of the day, for professional work, I much prefer the bigger sister, the Fuji X-Pro 1 (Marcia).


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Fuji X-E1 in Montana with 18mm lens | Troutisme on Facebook

Fuji X-E1 in Montana with 18mm lens | Troutisme on Facebook | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

Sample Shots from Montana


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How to never miss another shot with the Fujifilm X-E1: Zone focusing | Mike Kobal

How to never miss another shot with the Fujifilm X-E1: Zone focusing | Mike Kobal | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

 

This is a quick guide on how to set up your Fujifilm X-E1 for general street photography: Amazingly easy with the 14mm, since all we have to do is switch to manual focus mode, and check the “zone of acceptable sharpness”, indicated on the DOF scale for the chosen aperture. This caused confusion because the digital indicator does not correspond to the markings on the 14mm and some of you emailed, wondering if you were reading the markings incorrectly. For a given image format, depth of field is determined by three factors: the focal length of the lens, the aperture and the camera-to-subject distance. On the Fujinon 14mm, at F16, when focused near the 1m mark, the markings on the lens barrel indicate an acceptable focus zone from infinity to approximately 0.5m. This covers quite a range and I found it to be a realistic estimation of what I consider “sharp enough”, your mileage may vary, since the acceptable circle of confusion varies relative to the amount of magnification of your image. The digital DOF indicator shows a much shorter zone when focused near the 1m mark, from about 0.75m to approx 2.5m. (If you are super critical or make huge prints or projections, this might be the scale to go by) which corresponds roughly to the f8 on the lens barrel. When shooting with the 18mmat f5.6 for instance, I found the DOF indicator very conservative and in general assume when focused around the 3m mark to get everything from 2m to approx 5m in focus, the digital scale indicates about 1/2 of that. The only gripe when zone focusing on the 18mm is the lack of a focus lock, see the image below for my solution:) It is very easy to accidentally turn the focus ring and ruin your capture, the rubber band holds the focusing ring in place. Not a problem on the 14mm, since we can check the focus setting right on the lens and don’t have to look at the LCD or through the EVF, which allows us to set focus BEFORE we lift the camera to frame the shot. The way Fuji implemented manual focus, in addition to the small size and light weight, makes the Fujinon 14mm a real winner in practical shooting situations.....


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Fujifilm XE1 vs Fuji XPro1 Camera | Ben Evans

 

English Photographer Ben Evans compares the Fuji XE1 and XPro1 cameras in Barcelona. Hand-on photography with several photographs made with the cameras during the review.

The balance is that the Fuji XE1, while lacking the hybrid optical/electronic viewfinder makes up for this with a cheaper price, upgraded EVF (electronic viewfinder), built-in flash and slightly smaller size. It was therefore the 'winner' in this little hands-on camera test.

Many thanks to Hiromi from www.HiromiTorres.com for shooting this video! If you'd like to get in touch and contribute to a microphone for her so that future tutorials and reviews sound better, she'd really appreciate it!....



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The Fuji X-E1 camera review | Alexander Hessentswey

The Fuji X-E1 camera review | Alexander Hessentswey | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


First time I worried – can I shoot with Fuji X-E1 just like I can with the Panasonic G1? Maybe I can’t shoot good enough with anything but the Panasonic (I’ve gotten used to it) and that means I have to stay in the system and get a GH2 or GH3. I know there is compatibility much like it happens with lovers or friends or co-authors. There can be a camera or lens incompatible with me  (as Jupiter-37A) — it can be great or high-grade but I can’t do anything with it. But when I saw pictures from X-Pro1 and X-E1 in reviews I was blown away like several years ago with Lumix G1 and later with Panaleica 25mm f:1.4. So X-E1 couldn’t come out of my mind. And I feel this is the time to try anything else and to be clear — this Fuji. At first it was clear that Panasonic with its pro DSLR-like controls is superior in ergonomics. But most of the Fuji’s annoyances disappeared in about a week or two when I tried to know the camera better. Some things were done in the other way, some were not so important.

 

So the things that stayed are: slow autofocus and operations (not so slow in some conditions — see below), a lack of 3-4 buttons for quick access to important settings, and… mostly unusable auto-ISO that have lost custom shutter speed limit somehow. (At the moment of writing we were waiting for the 1.04 firmware, by now autofocus accuracy and speed were improved, read below.) ....


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Fujifilm X-E1 | Digital Camera Review

Fujifilm X-E1 | Digital Camera Review | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Conclusion

The X-Pro1 was 2012’s most fun new camera, but if you’re one of those people that thinks saving money is fun too, Fujifilm has the answer. By reducing the X-E1’s footprint and stripping out the novel—but unhelpful—hybrid viewfinder, the company has shaved $400 off the X-Pro1’s already-reduced price tag, all without sacrificing much of that model’s stellar performance. For better or worse, our most enthusiastic praise is reserved not for the camera itself, but for the new kit lens. When the X-mount debuted, Fujifilm showed a commitment to high quality glass with its first three prime offerings, but many wondered if this performance would extend to a zoom lens. Now we know the answer. The X-E1’s 18-55mm kit lens is almost exactly as sharp as the XF 35mm f/1.4, which is really quite amazing for a zoom lens. We only wish the aperture and focus rings were mechanical. As for the most important tests, many scores match the X-Pro1’s numbers. Noise reduction is almost as strong, and white balance is nearly equivalent between the two. Dynamic range is also roughly equal, although the X-E1 is able to carry its performance further down the ISO range. We were surprised by the camera’s just-okay color accuracy score, and our high weighting of this test will drag the overall score down, however this is but one blemish against a backdrop of impressive results. Minus the X-E1’s smaller frame, hardware is also similar, most notably the “X-Trans” APS-C sensor, which omits a low-pass filter to trade video moire for sharper stills. Video is sort of an afterthought on this camera anyway, but at least continuous shooting speed is still a respectable 5.5-ish frames per second. Of course the X-E1 is still a lot of fun too. All of the retro mechanical dials are back, and they turn everyday photography into an empowering, hands-on experience. Apart from these dials, the button layout is not without its quirks and problems, and we do wish Fujifilm had made at least some effort in this area, but rest assured the X-E1 has wholly carried over the X-Pro1’s distinct shooting experience. Autofocus is also fixed. The X-Pro1 got a lot of flak for its lackluster focus system, especially when compared to the Olympus OM-D E-M5, its close competitor. While the X-E1 is still no match for Olympus’ autofocus efforts, and the camera still probably isn’t appropriate for fast action, excessive hunting isn’t nearly the problem it was for the X-Pro1. The Fujifilm X-E1 is all of the fun and none of the frivolity of the X-Pro1. The decision to exchange the hybrid OVF for lower costs will make a lot of consumers happy, but keeping performance at basically the same level is the real achievement here. We loved having this camera in-house and hate to see it go. Anyone who’s been watching this series but put off by the price should take a second look. We recommend this camera for those hoping to more fully enjoy the photographic process, or really anyone who wants to capture sharp photos and have a good time while doing so.


Overall Score: 7.6


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FujiFilm X-E1 Review | Palle Schultz

FujiFilm X-E1 Review |  Palle Schultz | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

Not too long ago I decided to buy the FujiFilm X-E1. I originally wanted to go full frame, but the Fuji was so impressive, that I went for that instead of questioning myself throwing money at a full frame, instead of the medium format camera that I really want, but not yet can afford.

To love or to hate
I have a love/hate relationship with my Fujifilm X100, and the X-E1 carries on that tradition. Autofocus is still, although better, not impressive. But the overall feel and manual approach you have to attack this camera with, is highly rewarding. When you get it right, and eventually you will get it right, then you'll start to love the X-E1 for what it is....

Conclusion
With the X-E1, YOU are the photographer and the artist. There are no Instagram magic, that makes a dull picture exiting. You have to think up what you want to show in the scene you capture, you have to be an artist and a photographer. And that is why I like it so much. I do believe it forces me to be a better photographer.

Some negative points
There are very few flaws with the camera. If you shoot pictures in an environment with strong side spotlights, and have the camera set to M, it can trick the viewfinder completely, and you can’t see what you are framing, because it is overly lit up. What to do then? I’m a left eye, and the rare times this happens, I shift to my right, look at the scene with my left, and release the shutter. If you are right eyed, open the left eye and your brain composes the two images together, and you can sort of frame your subject correctly.

Improvements
Maybe it would be a good thing, if Fuji let you set a lowest acceptable shutter speed, when using auto ISO. As it is now, if you use automatic ISO, the camera too often sets the shutter speed way to low. The camera doesn’t produce much noise at high ISO levels, so it renders the auto ISO function more or less useless, that you end up with blurry pics, because of a low shutter speed. Therefore, I don’t use auto iso in this camera. The X100 handles automatic settings superbly, and you can shoot almost blindfolded in any condition, and still get great pics. That is not an option with the X-E1, you have to be alert at all times.

Love & Hate
It keeps you on your toes, and you love the X-E1 for it….. and sort of hate it also, like an annoying sibling. :-)


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X-E1 is a great tool for street photography (images from Marrakech) | Marcus Beard

X-E1 is a great tool for street photography (images from Marrakech) | Marcus Beard | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


I've just spent 3 days in Marrakech on a business trip, and packed the Fuji X-E1 and 35mm in the hope of getting a few hours off to explore the old city. I'd been before with the 5D MkII and some lenses, but found photography very hard work owing to the local's distaste for having pictures taken. (At least some genuinely do not like it on the grounds of their religion, whilst the more tourist facing people don't mind if they are paid for having their photo taken). Like in any public place, the wielding of an SLR seems to scream "photographer" and make you conspicuous. So this time I tried with the little Fuji in my short time off (just two hours ). I found it a much better camera for this type of environment than the DSLR. I felt less embarrassed wielding a smaller camera, and it was clear to me that people were not as bothered about having their pictures taken even when they noticed I was there. It's funny how the size of the camera seems to make so much difference (I'm sure more seasoned street photographers than me will find this blindingly obvious). Of course, the most important thing is to treat the subject with respect, but I really did find that the camera also made a difference. Here are some shots - the camera and lens performed really well it what were often very low levels of light. Very few mis-focussed shots, excellent exposure and colour. I love the rendering from the XF35m F1/4 wide open too. This is not my particular forté in photography - I'm not well practiced in "street photography" so any comments more than welcome!


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SkullFilms Productions: CaptureOne 7.0.2 and the FujiFilm X-E1 short words.. | Daniel Blasko

SkullFilms Productions: CaptureOne 7.0.2 and the FujiFilm X-E1 short words.. | Daniel Blasko | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


So I wanted to try what the forum writers call imposible, shoot action with the X-E1. To make it even harder I only have a non-TTL flash and really crappy indoor (cave) lighting conditions. I called up a friend and a really good skater, Daniel Blasko and he was up for the task.

We headed over to Area 51 in Gothenburg and did a quick two hour session. Basically the rundown is simple, I´ve been shooting skate, snowboard and in short.. everything that goes fast for over a decade now so the motivation and knowhow is not totally f-cked from my side when it comes to actually produces somewhat good pictures in this scenario.

My quick thought are.. flash.. problems and issues and my knowhow of this specific camera.. well there is a lot to wish in the knowledge area for this camera and Im not quite there to say the least. Cant get the flash to sync at all.. tried to do the best but It seems to lock on other settings that I cant find out within the menu system (during the started shoot). The camera is sloooow on autofocus even with the AE-L/AE-F button and I winded up trying to shoot totally manual.

The flash was stuck on 2nd curtain when I finally got it to sync, and sync only worked full to 1/125 after that.. well there were sporadic symptoms ;)

So what came out?

Did a mix of lenses and even tried out the new adapter for a couple of the Canon lenses.


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Sony RX1 and the X-E1 | Andre Goosen

Sony RX1 and the X-E1 | Andre Goosen | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it


Hello world! I’m very excited to share this with all of you. There has been huge amounts of interest in my Sony RX1 post so i thought i would share 2 frames shot tonight for a lovely client who was nice enough to let me use 2 of the photos to show you what i mean by “Pro” quality from a small camera. The photo you see above was shot with the brand new Sony RX1 and i still can’t believe how spectacularly good it is… and it’s a total pleasure to use.

Here is a 100% enlargement from the Sony for the Pixel Peepers… (i don’t really care too much about this but i know people will ask)

The second image was shot with the Fuji X-E1 and is equally spectacular… these are two very different systems.. both have pros and cons… but man… i love them both!!!

 

Here is a shot to show the diffence in size between the two cameras. The Fuji on the Left and the Sony on the right… keep in mind that the Sony is a FULL-FRAME camera and the Fuji is not.

 

I am totally blown away by the quality and the sixe of these two cameras and you can expect a full writeup in the next few weeks once i’ve had enough time to fall in-love again....


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Pierre Andre Goosen's comment, January 22, 2013 7:00 AM
Update: i've just finished a food shoot using the RX1 Exclusively... i am very happy with the results and the versatility of the camera... So much so, i've sold all my DSLR gear.
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A few thoughts on the Sony Nex 6 and the Fuji X-E1 | Mike Kobal

A few thoughts on the Sony Nex 6 and the Fuji X-E1 | Mike Kobal | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

Better late then never. I finally had the chance to play with the Sony Nex 6 and the new collapsible 16-50mm kit lens. First thing I noticed was the size of the lens, retracted, it is about the same size as the Fujinon 18mm f2 and looked proportionally “correct” on the Nex body. There was no time for an in depth comparison between the Fuji X-E1 since I only had the camera for half a day. Instead, I will try to summarize my impressions of both cameras.....

 

As a purist with no interest in video, the choice is easy. Fuji X-E1. Anyone serious about video, the Nex 6 is a no brainer. I hope this helps some of you to make a decision. PS: I was also interested to find out how the 16-50mm collapsible lens performs, esp when compared to Sony’s monster flagship 18-200mm and managed to shot a quick test. Should have it up in a couple of days.


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