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University student engagement using digital curation and career goal setting

University student engagement using digital curation and career goal setting | Best practices | Scoop.it
Around the world, participation rates in tertiary education are on the rise and one of the key challenges facing educators is finding ways to engage these students. We present the results of a project that assesses the impact of an engagement strategy in which a cohort of students entering their first year of university (1) establish and maintain a clear goal of their ideal future career and (2) make use of a web-based digital curation tool to research and present their findings.

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Karen Dunlap's curator insight, January 24, 9:18 AM

Extremely insightful.

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, January 26, 3:25 PM

Some interesting findings here. Curation is a useful teaching tool.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, January 27, 6:52 AM

University student engagement using digital curation and career goal setting | @scoopit via @NikPeachey http://sco.lt/...

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The Digital Writing Process

The Digital Writing Process | Best practices | Scoop.it

Now, with nearly 20 years of middle and high school teaching behind me, I still respect the writing process approach and its benefits. I also recognize that the nature of writing has changed tremendously over those two decades due to the significant influence of digital tools and sources. Of course, today’s composers still must meet the commonly accepted conventions of the genre in which they are engaged, but our visual digital culture creates different demands than did the primarily print text-based world.


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Digital Communication Students's curator insight, December 4, 2015 7:00 AM

"The nature of writing has changed tremendously over those two decades due to the significant influence of digital tools and sources". We completely agree with this phrase. Our way of writing is changing more than we notice. I figure that adults notice this more than young people, because this last group were born with the Internet. Nevertheless, its very important to learn how to write properly, this article provides the tools and the practice we need.

Annenkov's curator insight, December 5, 2015 9:14 AM

Algorythm SOARS:
    Survey
Organize
    Address:
Revise:
    Survey Again:

Akili Nzuri's curator insight, July 24, 3:06 PM

I chose this one because it is important for me to understand how the writing process has become digital, considering how my students learn it through the computer. 

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Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class

Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class | Best practices | Scoop.it
Use these ten reflective questions at the end of class to help learners deepen their understandings of themselves and their work.

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MARÍA JOSEFINA AGUILAR LEO's curator insight, March 19, 2015 2:10 PM

añada su visión ...

Richard Varey's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:15 AM

L

Mary Cunningham's curator insight, April 4, 2015 12:35 PM

These would be great questions for the end of any and all PD sessions we do!

Maybe they should take the place of the surveys we usually do?

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3 Tips for Teaching Great Question Writing | Teach.com

3 Tips for Teaching Great Question Writing | Teach.com | Best practices | Scoop.it

"What if you could design questions that engage students at this level in your classroom? What if you could do so without the burden of having to make the subject matter relevant or relatable to every single student?

The secret to writing good questions or problems may surprise you. The key, according to Willingham, is to pose questions or problems that can be solved. That means questions or problems that are not too hard and not too easy, but just right. Think Goldilocks."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 10, 2015 9:06 AM

How do you teach students to write good questions (or how to ask good questions)? This post suggests that good questions have to be at the right level of difficulty and provides three tips that will help you and your students learn how to write good questions (and I suspect how to ask them as well).

What are the three tips?

1. Shore up the students' prior knowledge

2. Lighten students' cognitive load

3. Un-situate students' learning

Each of these tips is described in more detail int he post and some additional links are also provided.

Teaching students how to question, either in writing or verbally, is a critical skill and this post provides some great ideas on ways to help students with the cognitive load so they are supported in the process. You might also want to check out the post Socrative Smackdown which has students learn discussion strategies, some of which are helpful with questions (and that is geared to students in grades 6 - 12).

Andrew Blanco's curator insight, February 5, 2015 10:57 AM

how to respond to great questions

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25 Practices That Foster Lifelong Learning - InformED

25 Practices That Foster Lifelong Learning - InformED | Best practices | Scoop.it

"Is your capacity for learning is fixed or fluid? Can you improve your intelligence and talents through hard work and practice, or are you stuck with the brains you’ve got? Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck says most of us have either a “fixed” or “growth” mindset when it comes to learning. Most of us can get through sixteen years of schooling regardless of which mindset we have, but when it comes to lifelong learning–learning for the sake of learning, without outside pressure–only a growth mindset will cut it."


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Tony Guzman's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:47 AM

I am a firm believer of lifelong learning and this

Li Banban's curator insight, October 20, 2014 8:23 PM

keep a growth mindset! its never too late to  learn.

Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, November 7, 2014 4:43 AM

These are excellent teaching and learning resources to add to your 21st Century learning environment to promote lifelong learning.

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6 Great tools for content curation - Daily Genius

6 Great tools for content curation - Daily Genius | Best practices | Scoop.it

"I read recently that content curation is dead. I have a few different arguments against this concept, but for now, I’ll keep it short and sweet: Content curation is not dead, and while the debate over curating content online vs creating new content will rage on and on, curating content for other reasons is still going strong.

 That said, there are a lot of different ways to go about content curation, so we’ve test driven a few different tools so you can figure out which might work best for you whether you’re curating content for work projects, assigning it as a school project, for your own professional development, or personal interests."


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magnus sandberg's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:31 AM

I'm rescooping this for three reasons. First, the term "curation" is fairly new to me and it is nice to see how different forms it can take. Secondly, I read so many blogposts entitled "10 tools for this" or "35 reasons for that". It is nice too see one of those where all of the 6 tools are actually great. Third, the fact that I actually have experience with three of the six tools makes me feel good. So enjoy :) 

Olga Boldina's curator insight, October 6, 2014 6:42 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Michail Darley's curator insight, October 9, 2014 1:32 AM

What sort of learning occurs when we curate content? Well it depends on how carefully, intelligently and awarely we do it. These tools provide the how.

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A Quick Comparison of Behaviorism, Cognitivism and Constructivism

A Quick Comparison of Behaviorism,  Cognitivism and Constructivism | Best practices | Scoop.it

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Rachel groff's curator insight, September 17, 10:24 AM

This chart is very helpful for showing the similarities and differences between these schools of psyxhology

Sharaya Baltimore's curator insight, September 20, 12:29 PM

I like that it gives a comparison of behaviorism, cognitism and constructivism (even though we aren't looking at that school) and it also gives information about the teachers, learner and techniques, etc.


 

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Seven Ways to Increase Student Engagement in the Classroom

Seven Ways to Increase Student Engagement in the Classroom | Best practices | Scoop.it

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, September 11, 2014 11:33 AM

Seven Ways to Increase Student Engagement in the Classroom

Lee Hall's curator insight, September 12, 2014 3:52 PM

I plan to use the 3-2-1 method in my very next class. Great ideas.

Mary Starry's curator insight, September 13, 2014 9:38 PM

Great graphic that summarizes things we've all heard before, but helps keep them in mind so we really do utilize them with students.

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Bloom's 'Digital' Taxonomy - Printable Reference Table

Bloom's 'Digital' Taxonomy - Printable Reference Table | Best practices | Scoop.it
This overview shows the progression of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy, how each thinking skill applies in practice, and examples of activities using digital tools.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 24, 2014 9:26 PM

This version of Bloom's Taxonomy has been extended with a sharing component for Bloom's Digital Taxonomy and is listed in the higher order thinking skills. The functional level of sharing is publicly sharing, publishing and broadcasting.

Along with this printable version of Bloom's Taxonomy you will also find links to five resources. Four of these look at Bloom's (in a variety of ways) and one is a research paper that looks at sustainable innovation in teacher practice.

Randy D. Nichols's curator insight, August 25, 2014 11:12 AM

Remediating Bloom for new literacies.

Helen Teague's curator insight, August 25, 2014 2:24 PM

This is a wonderful resource with a jpeg link and a description...thank you for scooping it, Beth!

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The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies | Best practices | Scoop.it
How to use open-ended, close-ended, and a double question technique to inspire deeper thinking in your students.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 11, 2014 9:38 PM

Teaching students to ask questions is not an easy task. This is the first in a series of two posts that will explore ways that teachers may ask questions to help their students "learn more from text and from the world around them." He is using the book Goldilocks and the Three Bears to model a number of strategies to use in the classroom

* Tell - Read the story or have them read the story. Ask questions that refer back to the text

* Suggest - Provide "children with choices about what might happen next or possible opinions they might have."

* Ask a closed question - "These questions generally elicit yes or no answers. They can bring students to different temporal areas or elaborations of details, but the extent of this is structured by the question."

* Ask an open ended question - questions that provide lots of options.

* The two-question rule - follow the first question with a second question allowing students to probe more deeply (and sometimes a third question).

Find examples of questions for each area listed above as well as the reasoning behind why the two-question rule is a good one to use.

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Intrinsic Motivation for the Classroom

Intrinsic Motivation for the Classroom | Best practices | Scoop.it
Bring on the i. I just finished reading several books about intrinsic motivation. None of the research is new, so why aren't we incorporating intrinsic motivation into the classroom more? Here are ...

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Agisa Abdulla's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:44 PM

authentic learning can happen with intrinsic motivation

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, June 27, 2014 2:34 AM

I love this break down! Which motivation technique inspires learners  the best? Can both be meaningful and why? Which technique do you feel Common Core applies most heavily?

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, July 2, 2014 7:01 PM

ahhh...esse tal MOTIvo para AÇÃO... vale a pena conhecer mais a respeito para auxiliar os aprendizes a encontrarem o seu próprio caminho: interiormente ou exteriormente ?


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21 Ways to Check for Student Understanding

21 Ways to Check for Student Understanding | Best practices | Scoop.it

"The ultimate goal of teaching is to do just that – teach, not stand up in the front of the room and talk.

But sometimes it’s easier to talk than to teach, as we all know, especially when we need to cover a lot of material in a short amount of time. We hope students will understand...

The problem is, we rely on these tests to measure understanding, and then we move on. Few of us take the time to address weaknesses and misunderstandings after the tests have been graded."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 1, 2014 10:00 PM

How do you go about checking for understanding? Exit slips may be too late to correct misunderstandings. This post provides 21 suggestions on ways to check for students' understanding. A few of them are listed below. Click through to the post for more information on them as well as additional suggestions.

* Avoid yes/no questions

* Ask students to summarize

* Misconception check

* Peer instruction

WEAC's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:04 PM

These are all great, but I particularly like this one: 

3-2-1: Students consider what they have learned by responding to the following prompt at the end of the lesson: 3) things they learned from your lesson; 2) things they want to know more about; and 1) questions they have. The prompt stimulates student reflection on the lesson and helps to process the learning.
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7 Ways Teaching Has Changed

7 Ways Teaching Has Changed | Best practices | Scoop.it

"Teachers are the arbitrators of knowledge and culture.

Knowledge and culture are each dynamic, endlessly crashing and churning.

This makes teaching significantly important and difficult work, and can leave teaching—as a craft—wide-eyed and nonplussed in response.

Worse, those outside the bubble of education can understandably struggle to understand the problem.

What are the teaching in those schools anyway? How is it any different from when I was in school?"


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 28, 2014 10:13 PM

How has teaching changed? Below are the seven key ideas. .

1. A culture of emerging literacies

2. A society that is mobile

3. A world where equity is a central theme

4. A society of constant connectivity

5. A world where the technology learns, too

6. A context that demands new credibility in an era of information

7. A culture that can seem, well, distracted

Many teachers may be overwhelmed with these changes and may require professional development to help them develop new skills that technology brings. But change has happened before and will continue to happen. The question is how are we adapting to the changes and how can we assist our students in becoming independent  learners in this new age of learning?

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, March 29, 2014 9:09 AM

7 Ways Teaching Has Changed

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Colleges need to teach healthy digital boundaries

Colleges need to teach healthy digital boundaries | Best practices | Scoop.it
Nielsen Media Research has dubbed those born after 1990 and who have lived their adolescent years after the 2000s Generation C, in large part because of their constant connectivity to all digital things. Students who are now entering our colleges' and universities' doors simply don’t know life without cellphones, iPads and laptops. And cellphones are not all bad. These gadgets help college students easily keep in touch with families who may be far away and give students access to campus resources to help navigate the complexities of their new college life.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, December 23, 2015 12:43 AM

Interesting article. I particularly like this "Cellphones have become the new-age security blankets."

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Making the most of Bloom's Taxonomy

Making the most of Bloom's Taxonomy | Best practices | Scoop.it
Sadly when most educators think of Bloom’s they think of just the single domain, the Cognitive, that rules so much of what we do in education. Had we focused on all three domains equally we may have better understood the part we do use and be much closer to a holistic view of education where the ‘Affective’ and ‘Psychomotor’ domains are viewed as equals to the cognitive. It is a shame that partly due to our obsession with Bloom’s we ignore the important aspects of our student’s feelings (hearts) and their doings (hands) despite these clearly playing a part in the taxonomy.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, September 14, 2015 12:35 AM

Some food for thought.

Gary Harwell's curator insight, September 14, 2015 6:52 AM

Sounds good in theory.

Jim Barentine's curator insight, September 15, 2015 1:32 AM

So important to work in the upper tiers with students!

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Questions to Ask Oneself While Designing Learning Activities

Questions to Ask Oneself While Designing Learning Activities | Best practices | Scoop.it
I absolutely love planning lessons from scratch.  I just got a job teaching technology units for a summer camp for elementary age students. I can design and teach whatever I want - planning for a d...

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Marisol Araya Fonseca's curator insight, February 8, 2015 12:19 PM

Excellent guide to follow when planning our classes.

Robyn Jay's curator insight, August 4, 2015 9:47 PM

Jackie Gerstein shares nine questions that you might consider asking yourself as you design new units. Two are listed below. The infographic she designed, with nine questions is in the image above, and you can access a list of the nine questions as well as the infographic in her post.

* Will the learners get the chance to share their work with other learners with a more global audience?

* Will the learners find the learning activities engaging? interesting? relevant? useful?

Gerstein's questions help you focus on the learner.They may help you transform lessons in ways you had not envisioned.

Dalia Rodriguez's curator insight, February 17, 10:12 PM

This image provides questions to to ask yourself when you want to plan learning activities,. You want to ensure that the activities are age appropriate. 

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3 Tips for Teaching Great Question Writing | Teach.com

3 Tips for Teaching Great Question Writing | Teach.com | Best practices | Scoop.it

"What if you could design questions that engage students at this level in your classroom? What if you could do so without the burden of having to make the subject matter relevant or relatable to every single student?

The secret to writing good questions or problems may surprise you. The key, according to Willingham, is to pose questions or problems that can be solved. That means questions or problems that are not too hard and not too easy, but just right. Think Goldilocks."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 10, 2015 9:06 AM

How do you teach students to write good questions (or how to ask good questions)? This post suggests that good questions have to be at the right level of difficulty and provides three tips that will help you and your students learn how to write good questions (and I suspect how to ask them as well).

What are the three tips?

1. Shore up the students' prior knowledge

2. Lighten students' cognitive load

3. Un-situate students' learning

Each of these tips is described in more detail int he post and some additional links are also provided.

Teaching students how to question, either in writing or verbally, is a critical skill and this post provides some great ideas on ways to help students with the cognitive load so they are supported in the process. You might also want to check out the post Socrative Smackdown which has students learn discussion strategies, some of which are helpful with questions (and that is geared to students in grades 6 - 12).

Andrew Blanco's curator insight, February 5, 2015 10:57 AM

how to respond to great questions

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What is 21st century education? - YouTube

"Our world is changing at an unprecedented pace. To prepare our students, lessons must go beyond the "3 R's" and foster 21st century skills. Skills like critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity will be essential for students to take on the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead."


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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, October 13, 2014 6:24 AM

Entièrement d'accord. Entre autre pour la pensée critque par rapport aux informations reçues. 

Tony Guzman's curator insight, October 13, 2014 11:52 AM

This short video presentation challenges educators with the question: What is 21st century education?

Audrey's curator insight, October 15, 2014 3:22 PM

All this is true  so where do we start?  Children do not start learning when they go to school.  They start learning the moment their eyes open.  Parents can help their children activate their brains and create fantastic neural networks.  All children can encompass all the different styles of learning; Visual:; Auditory; Verbal; Kinaesthetic: -Using touch and taste to explore the information; Logical: a  mathematical approach to concepts; Interpersonal -Learning in groups; Intrapersonal - Learning  alone. Try some of the early learning from home school resources.

 curating for http://www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

 

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The Changing Face of Early Literacy – Digital is Different - Primary Preoccupation

The Changing Face of Early Literacy – Digital is Different - Primary Preoccupation | Best practices | Scoop.it
I’ve spent a lot of time lately reflecting on the way I teach literacy in my classroom and about the ways that the digital text I often use to teach now is inherently different from the text I used to teach reading ten years ago. In an earlier post, I talked about some of the ways that I think using digital text in shared reading, such as when reading projected blog comments or tweets, is actually superior to the traditional text we have long used.

Even if you are not convinced that digital text can work better than traditional text, it is difficult to argue that digital text is not here to stay or that it is not becoming increasingly important. It is and will be a significant part of our students’ lives both now and in the future. If this will be true, it only makes sense to begin to teach children strategies for reading this new form of text.

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David Smart's curator insight, October 4, 2014 12:46 PM

Literacy and mobile content. 

Toby Grosswald's curator insight, October 5, 2014 7:22 AM

Use for Nov. SMORE

Read last 2 paragraphs to reflect.

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There's a Better Way to Teach Critical Thinking: 9 Rules of Thumb

There's a Better Way to Teach Critical Thinking: 9 Rules of Thumb | Best practices | Scoop.it
Critical thinking is the study of clear and unclear thinking. A simple definition, maybe, but that's how it should be. The term was popularised long ago-

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Kathy Lynch's curator insight, September 14, 2014 1:32 PM

Thx Beth Dichter!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 22, 2014 12:03 PM

I suspect critical thinking predates the Ancient Greeks. Without critical thinking, humans might not have gotten to that point in history. A great take away from the article is the importance of questioning. A second take away, perhaps hidden away, is the importance of questioning what we think critical thinking is and is not and engaging in conversations.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Need Help Picking the Right Learning Game? Some Things to Consider

Need Help Picking the Right Learning Game? Some Things to Consider | Best practices | Scoop.it

What criteria matter when considering learning games? First, ask the broad questions: How and when a game can be used? Then, be more specific: What kind of game is best suited to particular learning objectives?

 


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, September 2, 2014 10:55 AM

Games are valuable teaching and learning tools.

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, September 3, 2014 1:19 PM

Great article! 

Training in Business's curator insight, September 4, 2014 5:22 AM

Need Help Picking the Right Learning Game? Some Things to Consider 

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Shouldn't Education and Learning Be the Same Thing?

Shouldn't Education and Learning Be the Same Thing? | Best practices | Scoop.it

"Schooling and institutionalized education have become removed from true, instinctual, and human/humane learning.  Humans have been learning since the beginning of time with major discoveries and innovations historically and currently emerging in spite of school.  This is the biggest problem I have with schools – most are contrived and coercive and do not honor the innate human need and desire to learn, discover, and evolve."

 


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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, August 22, 2014 10:41 AM

Interesting post which discusses how to pull schools out of the 20th century. 

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, August 22, 2014 10:49 AM

Interesting post which discusses how to pull schools out of the 20th century. 

Ian Lowe's curator insight, May 24, 2015 3:55 AM

student at the heart of learning. problem based and context based learning key for this. students will often ask " why are we doing this?" if they can apply the lesson to their life it then becomes obvious why they are learning

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A Quick, No-Nonsense Guide to Basic Instructional Design Theory

A Quick, No-Nonsense Guide to Basic Instructional Design Theory | Best practices | Scoop.it

"Of the many eLearning theories that influence the practice, three of them are used by professionals on a daily basis...Practice and theory actually goes hand in hand. This is true not only in instructional design but in any other field or discipline. Theory, far from crippling your practice, will actually help you improve the quality of your eLearning material. While a learning theory won't answer all of your design problems, it offers clarity throughout your process and directs you toward finding solutions."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 4, 2014 10:02 AM

Learn more about three learning theories of instructional design in this post:

* Constructivism

* Cognitivism

* Behaviorism

Why? Each theory looks at "HOW" students learn. Understanding the theories helps you design activities that will help learners move forward in their learning process.

The infographic provides a definition for each of the theories and then provides ideas on what each theory helps the learner practice.

As with most infographics from SHIFT's eLearning Blog, this post also provides additional information on each of the three theories as well as links to additional resources.

Explore this post to better understand why these theories are important to all teachers, in online learning, blended learning and face2face situation.

Progressive training's curator insight, July 4, 2014 10:32 AM

A Quick, No-Nonsense Guide to Basic Instructional Design Theory

Lina Heaster-Ekholm's curator insight, July 10, 2014 4:41 PM

Great graphic and good general overview

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“50 Best iPad Apps for Reading Disabilities” - teacherswithapps

“50 Best iPad Apps for Reading Disabilities” - teacherswithapps | Best practices | Scoop.it

" Whether you’re the parent of a child with a reading disability or an educator that works with learning disabled students on a daily basis, you’re undoubtedly always looking for new tools to help these bright young kids meet their potential and work through their disability. While there are numerous technologies out there that can help, perhaps one of the richest is the iPad, which offers dozens of applications designed to meet the needs of learning disabled kids and beginning readers alike. Here, we highlight just a few of the amazing apps out there that can help students with a reading disability improve their skills not only in reading, writing, and spelling, but also get a boost in confidence and learn to see school as a fun, engaging activity, not a struggle. Here are “50 Best iPad Apps for Reading Disabilities:”

 


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WEAC's curator insight, April 21, 2014 2:34 PM

If you work with students with learning disabilities, you will definitely want to browse through this list of helpful iPad apps.

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, April 22, 2014 7:29 AM

Hagamos uso del clic derecho traducir , es muy  intresante

Pam Furney's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:33 PM

This appears to be a useful list, not only for those with reading disabilities but for beginning readers, as well. 

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Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century

Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century | Best practices | Scoop.it
One of the take aways from the Curriculum Mapping Institute this past week was that it brought an upgrade to THE trusted KWL (Know, What to Know and Learned) Chart to the forefront. It seems a no b...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 23, 2014 9:57 PM

Not too long ago I posted an article that suggested we move from the KWL chart to the KWHL chart...and here is another post that suggests we make it more in-depth by adding the letters A and Q.

What do all these letters stand for?

K - What do I know?

W - What do I want to know?

H - How do I find out?

L - What have I learned?

A - What action will I take?

Q - What new questions do I have?

More in-depth discussions of these new letters are included in the post.

The Rice Process's curator insight, April 24, 2014 6:55 AM

Taking the KWL chart to the next level.

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:43 AM

I love this idea - it fits beautifully with the concept of Inquiry-based learning and students assuming ownership of the research process - Yay ACTION! The idea that learning and research are ongoing - and active - is a key element to new learning models. Very exciting!