Best of Photojournalism
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Best of Photojournalism
Some of the best photo from today reporters.
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World War II: The Fall of Imperial Japan

World War II: The Fall of Imperial Japan | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"After Germany surrendered in May of 1945, Allied attention focused on Japan. The island-hopping strategy adopted by the U.S. Navy successfully brought long range B-29 bombers within range of Japan's Home Islands, and massive bombing attacks took place involving high explosives, incendiary bombs, and finally the two most powerful weapons ever used in war, the newly-invented atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. After more than 80 days of fighting, Allied forces had captured the Japanese island of Okinawa by June, but at a horrible cost, with more than 150,000 casualties on both sides, and tens of thousands of civilians dead as well (many by their own hand). Okinawa was seen as a painful preview of a planned full invasion of Japan, and Allied generals predicted massive casualties if it took place. At the same time as the atomic bombings, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, invading occupied Manchuria with a force of more than one million soldiers, quickly defeating Japan's Kwantung Army. Six days after the bombing of Nagasaki, and after much internal struggle, Japan surrendered on August 15, 1945. World War II was over. Next week, in the final entry in this series, we'll take a look at what came next in a new post-war era. (This entry is Part 19 of a weekly 20-part retrospective of World War II)"

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Images of Libya from a Fallen Photographer

Images of Libya from a Fallen Photographer | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
Tim Hetherington changed lives and journalism. A friend reflects on that enduring legacy, and how it inspired an exhibition opening this weekend in New York.
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World War II: The Holocaust

World War II: The Holocaust | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"One of the most horrific terms in history was used by Nazi Germany to designate human beings whose lives were unimportant, or those who should be killed outright: Lebensunwertes Leben, or "life unworthy of life". First applied to the mentally impaired, later to the "racially inferior", or "sexually deviant", or merely "enemies of the state" both internal and external. From very early in the war, part of Nazi policy was to murder civilians en masse, especially targeting Jews -- which later in the war became Hitler's "final solution", the complete extermination of the Jews. Beginning with Einsatzgruppen death squads in the East, killing some 1,000,000 people in numerous massacres, later in concentration camps where prisoners were actively denied proper food and health care, and ending with the construction of extermination camps -- government facilities whose entire purpose was the systematic murder and disposal of massive numbers of people. In 1945, as advancing Allied troops began discovering many camps, they found the results of these policies: hundreds of thousands of starving and sick prisoners locked in with more thousands of dead bodies. Evidence of gas chambers, high-volume crematoriums, thousands of mass graves, documentation of awful medical experimentation, and much more. The Nazis killed more than 10 million people in this manner, including 6 million Jews. (This entry is Part 18 of a weekly 20-part retrospective of World War II)


Warning: All images in this entry are shown in full, not screened out for graphic content. There are many dead bodies. The photographs are graphic and stark. This is the reality of genocide, and of an important part of World War II and human history."


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Oil Spill Disaster on New Zealand Shoreline

Oil Spill Disaster on New Zealand Shoreline | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"Nine days ago, a Liberian-flagged container ship called the Rena ran aground on Astrolabe Reef, 14 miles offshore from Tauranga Harbor on New Zealand's North Island. In addition to the 2,100 containers aboard, the Rena was carrying 1,700 tons of fuel oil and another 200 tons of diesel fuel. A cracked hull and rough seas have dislodged more than 80 containers and spilled some 300 tons of oil already, fouling Tauranga beaches and reportedly killing some 1,000 birds so far. Salvage teams are racing to offload as much remaining oil as possible while cleanup crews are hard at work, coping with New Zealand's worst environmental disaster in decades."

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The Oakland-Berkeley Fire Revisited

The Oakland-Berkeley Fire Revisited | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
One week after a deadly wildfire killed 25 people and destroyed more than 3,000 homes in Oakland and Berkeley, California, photographer Richard Misrach photographed the aftermath.
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Jack Delano's American Sonata

Jack Delano's American Sonata | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
Over the course of a life that was as compelling as any of his subjects, Jack Delano's eye was matched only by his heart. Photographer, illustrator and composer - a tropical Renaissance man.
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Worst Flooding in Decades Swamps Thailand

Worst Flooding in Decades Swamps Thailand | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"Heavy monsoon rains have been drenching Southeast Asia since mid-July, causing mudslides and widespread flooding along the Mekong River. Parts of Thailand are now experiencing the worst floods in half a century, as water inundates villages, historic temples, farms, and factories. At least 281 people have been killed in Thailand, and another 200 in neighboring Cambodia. Rescue workers are scrambling to prevent a humanitarian disaster, and Thailand's prime minister is warning businesses not to use the flooding as an excuse to raise prices. About 8.2 million people in 60 of Thailand's 77 provinces have been affected by the flooding, and economic losses are so far estimated to top $2 billion. Collected here are recent images of the crisis in Thailand as some 10 million residents in Bangkok keep a wary eye on the approaching surge of floodwater, due to reach the capital in a few days."

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World War II: The Fall of Nazi Germany

World War II: The Fall of Nazi Germany | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

After the successful Allied invasions of western France, Germany gathered reserve forces and launched a massive counter-offensive in the Ardennes, which collapsed by January. At the same time, Soviet forces were closing in from the east, invading Poland and East Prussia. By March, Western Allied forces were crossing the Rhine River, capturing hundreds of thousands of troops from Germany's Army Group B, and the Red Army had entered Austria, both fronts quickly approaching Berlin. Strategic bombing campaigns by Allied aircraft were pounding German territory, sometimes destroying entire cities in a night. In the first several months of 1945, Germany put up a fierce defense, but was rapidly losing territory, running out of supplies, and running low on options. In April, Allied forces pushed through the German defensive line in Italy, and East met West on the River Elbe on April 25, 1945, when Soviet and American troops met near Torgau, Germany. Then came the end of the Third Reich, as the Soviets took Berlin, Adolf Hitler committed suicide on April 30, and Germany surrendered unconditionally on all fronts by May 8 (May 7 on the Western Front). Hitler's planned "Thousand Year Reich" lasted only 12 incredibly destructive years. (This entry is Part 17 of a weekly 20-part retrospective of World War II)

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Pictures of the Day: Greece and Elsewhere

Pictures of the Day: Greece and Elsewhere | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
Photographs from Greece, the Philippines, Russia and Afghanistan.
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Oktoberfest 2011

Oktoberfest 2011 | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"The taps were flowing and the oom-pah bands were oom-pahing again in Germany. It’s Oktoberfest time, and the world’s largest festival celebrating beer reportedly attracted some 6 million visitors this time around before the taps ran dry earlier this week. The origin of the event dates back to 1810 when Crown Prince Ludwig was married to Princess Therese and the people of Munich were invited to attend the festivities. Only beer brewed within the city limits of Munich can be served at the festival."

-- Lloyd Young

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Tyler Hicks: A Decade in Afghanistan

Tyler Hicks: A Decade in Afghanistan | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
For the New York Times staff photographer Tyler Hicks, war is no more and no less than who is near and whatever happens. C. J. Chivers reports on Mr. Hicks's photographs from the Afghan war over the past decade.
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Pictures of the Day: Israel and Elsewhere

Pictures of the Day: Israel and Elsewhere | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
Photographs from Israel, Greece, California and South Africa.
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Libya: The End of Qaddafi and the Fall of Sirte

Libya: The End of Qaddafi and the Fall of Sirte | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"Muammar Qaddafi has been killed in fighting in Sirte, according Libya's National Transitional Council. Anti-government fighters had been closing in on Qaddafi's final stronghold in Sirte, and reportedly attacked a convoy carrying the former leader today, capturing him. Qaddafi was apparently alive at the time, but died soon afterward. The uprising that began in February and built to an armed revolution has now claimed control of the country, the death of Qaddafi, and the capture of one of his sons today. Collected here are images from Sirte over the past ten days, and of the events surrounding the death of Qaddafi."

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As Water Rises, There's No Place Like (or for) Home

As Water Rises, There's No Place Like (or for) Home | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
Amelia Holowaty Krales spent 10 months on a disappearing island in the South Pacific. What she found was a tight-knit community that refuses to give up on its land.
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A simple day in the life...

A simple day in the life... | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"Often in the Big Picture we feature "slice of life" photography originating from around the world, brought to us by photographers based in those countries who work for the Associated Press, Reuters and Getty Images. The photographs are often simple and show daily life in many places that we might not be able to experience in any other way except through those photographers' documentation. The images themselves are somewhat universal - they show us where people live and how people live, sometimes not so differently than we do ourselves."

-- Paula Nelson

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Pictures of the Day: New York and Elsewhere

Pictures of the Day: New York and Elsewhere | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
Photographs from New York, Libya, Thailand and Tunisia.
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Pictures of the Day: Libya and Elsewhere

Pictures of the Day: Libya and Elsewhere | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
Photographs from Libya, Myanmar, Bhutan and Washington.
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The Occupy Wall Street movement spreads

The Occupy Wall Street movement spreads | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"What started in NewYork City in mid September, a call to "flood lower Manhattan, set up tents, kitchens, peaceful barricades and occupy Wall Street," has continued to feed similar groups around the United States taking up the name and cause. Groups have gathered to bring attention to many issues, with a central focus on the economic hardships and inequality they say many Americans face."

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Pictures of the Day: Ukraine and Elsewhere

Pictures of the Day: Ukraine and Elsewhere | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
Photographs from Ukraine, Libya, Liberia and Switzerland.
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Occupy Wall Street Spreads Beyond NYC

Occupy Wall Street Spreads Beyond NYC | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"It's now been three weeks since the "Occupy Wall Street" protests began in New York City's Financial District, and the movement has grown, spreading to other cities in the U.S. Protesters have organized marches, rallies, and "occupations" from Boston to Boise, Los Angeles to New Orleans, Seattle to Tampa. Using social media, handmade signs, and their voices, they are voicing anger at financial and social inequality and protesting the influence of corporate money in politics. Seattle police recently arrested 25 protesters camping out in Westlake Park, following on the heels of 700 arrests on New York's Brooklyn Bridge last week. Collected here are a some of the scenes from these protests across the U.S. over the past week, as the movement moves forward with no signs of slowing."

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A View of Hunger in North Korea

A View of Hunger in North Korea | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
Damir Sagolj was part of a group of journalists invited to document the food crisis in North Korea's farm belt late in September. His images, captured on a government-led tour, present a stark view of a rarely-seen region.
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In a Private Light: Diana Walker’s Photos of Steve Jobs

In a Private Light: Diana Walker’s Photos of Steve Jobs | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it
I first met Steve Jobs on a photo shoot for TIME in 1982. I had no idea that he was going to be my friend or that he was going to be this incredible genius—a part of all of our lives, in what we do and what we see.
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World War II: The Allied Invasion of Europe

World War II: The Allied Invasion of Europe | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"Starting with the Invasion of Sicily in July of 1943, and culminating in the June 6, 1944 D-Day Invasion of Normandy, Allied forces took the fight to the Axis powers in many locations across Western Europe. The push into Italy began in Sicily, but soon made it to the Italian mainland, with landings in the south. The Italian government (having recently ousted Prime Minister Benito Mussolini) quickly signed an armistice with the Allies -- but German forces dug in and set up massive defensive lines across Italy, prepared to halt any armed push to the north. After several major offensives, the Allies broke through and captured Rome on June 4, 1944. Two days later, the largest amphibious invasion in history took place, with nearly 200,000 Allied troops taking 7,000 ships and more than 3,000 aircraft toward the coast of Normandy, France on D-Day, June 6, 1944. Some 156,000 troops landed, 24,000 by air and the rest by sea, meeting stiff resistance from well-defended German positions across 50 miles of French coastline. After several days of intense warfare, Allied troops gained tenuous holds on several beaches, which they were able to grow with reinforcement and bombardment. By the end of June, Allies were in firm control of Normandy, and by August 25, Paris was liberated by the French Resistance, with help from the French Forces of the Interior and the U.S. 4th Infantry Division. In September, the Allies launched another major invasion, Operation Market Garden, the largest airborne operation of its time, where tens of thousands of troops descended on the Netherlands by parachute and glider. Though the landings were successful, troops on the ground were unable to take and hold their targets, including bridges across the Rhine River. Despite that setback, by late 1944, the Allies had successfully established a Western Front, and were preparing to advance on Germany. (This entry is Part 16 of a weekly 20-part retrospective of World War II)"

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Afghanistan: September 2011

Afghanistan: September 2011 | Best of Photojournalism | Scoop.it

"Ten Years. Troops from the United States and other coalition forces have now been in Afghanistan for a decade, following the initial bombing raids carried out by the U.S. on October 7, 2001. My father served in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, and I remember a conversation I had with him shortly after the attacks of September 11, where he said to me, "Son, I really hoped your generation wouldn't have to go through something like this." There are teenagers now who were just toddlers when their parents first deployed to Afghanistan. As a photo editor, I've been curating an entry about Afghanistan once a month for the past two years, and plan to continue to do so. The U.S. and some 35 other coalition nations currently have more than 130,000 soldiers stationed in Afghanistan, and it's important for us to see what they are dealing with, what we've asked them to do for so long -- and to see those who are so directly affected by this long conflict, the Afghan people themselves. Although the U.S. has been involved for a decade, the people of Afghanistan have known nothing but war for more than 30 years now."

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