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Being an Australian and Global Citizen
Teaching the rights and responsibilities of Australian citizenship and global citizenship to Stage 3 students
Curated by Lucy Whelan
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Clean Up Australia

Clean Up Australia | Being an Australian and Global Citizen | Scoop.it
Lucy Whelan's insight:

As the nation's largest community-based environmental events, Stage 3 students might already be familiar with this project. The website gives a detailed insight into the origins of the organisation, as well as variety of campaigns it runs through the year. It lists a number of ways for people to become involved in its campaigns and offers interactive resources for students to use.

In particular, it has created a recycling game, which engages students in learning how to recycle their waste. The value of this program is that students may have identified earlier in the topic that looking after the environment is something a good citizen might do; thus, this is a practical example of how students can live out their citizenship. Students can be encouraged to 'clean up' their homes, classroom, school playground and local areas.

As 'leaders' in their primary school, Stage 3 students can also be encouraged to take the lead in implimenting clean up programs at school. You might set them a project to investigate how the school recycles, and to see if they can improve the ways the school cares for the environment. You could also assign environmental roles, and give students responsibilities as 'environment officers' to oversee that the classroom and school playground are kept clean.

And of course, you can motivate your students to participate in Clean Up Australia Day. If this is done at the end of the topic, you can ask students to evaluate their experience in being involved, and how they feel it related to being a good citizen. 

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What is a Global Citizen?

What is a Global Citizen? | Being an Australian and Global Citizen | Scoop.it
Want to join thousands of others raising their voices for change? Register as a Global Citizen, and start taking action to fight extreme poverty today.
Lucy Whelan's insight:

This is a short video clip which depicts a number of people voicing what they believe a global citizen is. Often the speaker is a voice over, accompanied by images and video footage of people and places around the world. The content of the video is centred around the idea of universal rights, and each speaker identifies his or herself as a citizen of the world who is entitled ot those rights. 

As a resource for Stage 3 students, the video could be used as a minor text, to start discussions about the question of what is a global citizen. Teachers would have to combine it with another activity, such as group work around the themes identified in the video e.g. health, freedom of speech. 

Since it's a short video, you could watch it two or three times during the lesson and set a task of note taking. The purpose of this would be to improve Stage 3 students ability to listen and selectively identify key points.

An interesting assessment for the teacher would be to observe the reaction of different students in your class, particularly students who are from different parts of the world. In listening to their responses, you can gauge what sort of understanding they have of people in other parts of the world. 

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primary_school_teaching_resource.pdf

Lucy Whelan's insight:

The Department of Immigration and Citizenship has created a teaching resource manual for Upper Primary, which details learning outcomes, assessment tasks and activities, and curriculum links to state and territory documentation for teaching the topic of Australian citizenship. It also includes a number of resource sheets for students, providing background information on the topic, and activity sheets, which are linked with the learning activities outlined in the document. Included are links for electronic copies, which can be used by teachers via Smartboards.

For teachers, this is an informative resource, as each activity lists a step by step approach to ther lesson, and includes references to teaching tools and stategies that should be used e.g. interactive whiteboards, model the plus minus interesting (PMI) strategy. It also incorporates activities which moves students out of the classroom, such as conducting interviews and organising community events to celebrate Australia Day. 

This resource is helpful for teachers, because it cultivates the teacher's understanding of what the students should be learning at each point in the activity. It helps the teacher to be able to asses the students level of understanding and interaction throughout the topic, rather than at the end. This encourages teachers to adjust aspects of their lessons, depending on what they've observed about their students learning needs.  

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Australian 1967 Referendum - Creative Spirits

Australian 1967 Referendum - Creative Spirits | Being an Australian and Global Citizen | Scoop.it
The 1967 referendum made history: Australians voted overwhelmingly to amend the constitution to include Aboriginal people in the census and allow the Commonwealth to create laws for them.
Lucy Whelan's insight:

This webpage gives a detailed and interactive understanding of the 1967 Referendum from the perspective of Aboriginal people. It unpacks sections of the Australian Constitution that were under question under the referendum, for their failure to include Aboriginal people as members of the Australian society. It also includes interviews with Aboriginal people who were involved in the referendum, including a video clip, and part of an article written by Charles Dixon, Manager of the Foundation of Aboriginal Affairs, who explains the mixture of emotions felt when the referendum was passed. The webpage includes a link to an Aboriginal history timeline, which can be used as a resource in correlation with teaching about Aboriginal citizenship. 

This webpage would be a valuable resource to use within the context of a broader, historical view of Aboriginal Australian citizenship, perhaps using the timeline, and in particular, using it alongside the more recent apology from then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd. It is important to highlight the Referendum in particular because it demonstrates to students the long struggle that Aboriginal people endured in their fight for recognised and equal citizenship in Australia.

It would also be a good resource to encourage reflection amongst students about the history of Australian citizenship. Students could create a timeline of important events which impacted the development of Australian citizenship, in particular highlighting those events which relate to Aboriginal people. Students should also reflect on the position of Aboriginal people today in society, and whether or not they believe they have been given equal citizenship with other Australians. 

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Greta Maree's comment, May 2, 2013 8:45 AM
This article explores a detailed and interactive understanding of the 1967 Referendum from the perspective of Aboriginal people. Under the unit of history in the Queensland Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Framework, this webpage unpacks sections of the Australian Constitution and explores the failure to include Aboriginal people as members of the Australian society. This article would be a valuable resource to use within the context of a broader, historical view of Aboriginal Australian citizenship and to encourage reflection amongst students about the history of Australian citizenship.
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Leah Davies, M.Ed. - 20 Ideas for Teaching Citizenship to Children - Teachers.Net Gazette

Leah Davies, M.Ed. - 20 Ideas for Teaching Citizenship to Children - Teachers.Net Gazette | Being an Australian and Global Citizen | Scoop.it
Lucy Whelan's insight:

Leah Davies writes about why it is important to teach citizenship to children, and how teaching the values and characteristics of citizenship at a level that children can understand will encourage them to take a greater interest in their freedoms. She argues that inspiring an appreciation of their country will possibly lead children to eventually become responsible and active citizens in their communities, nation, and the world. At the end of the article she includes a list of 20 idea for activities designed to engage children in the concept of citizenship, which help foster their understanding and encourage them to become active citizens.

Many of the activities encourage students to be proactive, which offer great ideas for excursions. For Stage 3 students, many of the concepts introduced by citizenship, such as the privilege to the right to vote and obeying the law, can be connected with their understanding of Federal and State Parliament. If you were to use this after a Stage 3 trip to Canberra, you could ask students to recall what they learnt about the democratic processes of Australia, and how these encourage citizenship.

There are also some more creative activities mentioned, such as the use of technology to create a video on a topic related to citizenship. Students could be asked to investigate acts of good citizenship, or highlight a local community project they can get involved in. This can be used to foster students understanding of technology, and it engages students because it is recording their voices and opinions.

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