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Behavioral Targeting, Conversion Psychology, Content Personalization, and Privacy: How To Get The Right Message To The Right People at the Right Time Without Being Creepy

Behavioral Targeting, Conversion Psychology, Content Personalization, and Privacy: How To Get The Right Message To The Right People at the Right Time Without Being Creepy | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Don't look now, but someone - in fact, lots of "someones" - are watching you. While marketing companies have been collecting data on us long before the age of the Internet, they were limited in the...
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BehaviourWorks threads
Interesting articles on behavioural economics and related topics
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Investigating Emotional Spillover in the Brain

Investigating Emotional Spillover in the Brain | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Scientists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are discovering what happens in the brain when emotions from one event carry over to the next.
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5 Ways You Can Use Gestalt Principles for Powerful Imagery

5 Ways You Can Use Gestalt Principles for Powerful Imagery | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Gestalt principles describe the way our brain organizes visual information. This article explains how to use gestalt principles in your visual marketing.
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If You Are Bad at Reading Facial Expressions, Perhaps This Is Why

If You Are Bad at Reading Facial Expressions, Perhaps This Is Why | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
In a new book, a psychologist questions the assumption that facial expressions can always be neatly matched to a discrete emotion.
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How East and West think in profoundly different ways

How East and West think in profoundly different ways | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Psychologists are uncovering the surprising influence of geography on our reasoning, behaviour, and sense of self.
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Does the Language We Speak Affect Our Perception of Reality?

Does the Language We Speak Affect Our Perception of Reality? | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
The results of one Stanford study has implications for art, politics, law, even religion. 
 
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Babies’ gazes suggest we are born understanding color

Babies’ gazes suggest we are born understanding color | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Some color categories may be hardwired in infants
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The ‘untranslatable’ emotions you never knew you had

The ‘untranslatable’ emotions you never knew you had | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Learning to identify and cultivate these feelings could give you a richer and more successful life
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Why We Can’t Look Away From Our Screens

Why We Can’t Look Away From Our Screens | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
In a new book, the social psychologist Adam Alter warns that our devotion to digital devices has morphed into something very much like addiction.
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Lemonade Is Using Behavioral Science To Onboard Customers And Keep Them Honest | Fast Company

Lemonade Is Using Behavioral Science To Onboard Customers And Keep Them Honest | Fast Company | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Fintech startups like Lemonade are betting big that behavioral economics will give them an edge over incumbents.
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What's the Difference Between Sympathy and Empathy?

What's the Difference Between Sympathy and Empathy? | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Both 'sympathy' and 'empathy' come from the word 'pathos' ('feelings, emotion, or passion'), but they have slightly different meanings.
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The psychology of punishment is key to why people vote against their own interests

The psychology of punishment is key to why people vote against their own interests | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Donald Trump would not be US president without the votes of many, including Obamacare enrollees and immigrants, who are likely to find themselves worse off because of his policies. To some Democrat supporters, this widespread voting against self-interests can seem impossible to understand. To Molly Crockett, a neuroscientist and experimental psychologist at Oxford University, it makes perfect sense
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The Making Of Emotions, From Pleasurable Fear To Bittersweet Relief

The Making Of Emotions, From Pleasurable Fear To Bittersweet Relief | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Since ancient times, philosophers and scientists have viewed emotions as innate. In the latest Invisibilia, a psychologist argues that emotions spring from the sum of our experiences, not just wiring.
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Self-entitled, moi? Teens, narcissism and why 'special' and 'unique' are different things | Lea Waters

Self-entitled, moi? Teens, narcissism and why 'special' and 'unique' are different things | Lea Waters | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
The fear that all kids are budding narcissists has caused a damaging counter-reaction to making our children feel good about themselves
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Inspector Insight » Is Anger the Emotion of the 21st Century?

“Anger makes dull men witty, but it keeps them poor” – Elizabeth I Why is there so much anger in the world today? Anger has been cited as playing a part in the often strange and surprising politics of the last year (by myself among others), and only today I switched on the news to see that a...
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The Glossary of Happiness

The Glossary of Happiness | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Emily Anthes reports on the Positive Lexicography Project, an attempt by the positive psychologist Tim Lomas to catalogue foreign terms for happiness.
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Why We Shut Ourselves Off From Opposing Viewpoints

Why We Shut Ourselves Off From Opposing Viewpoints | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
New research points to some deep-seated psychological reasons we prefer to retreat into our ideological silos.By Tom Jacobs(Photo: Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images)Interested in an opportunity to earn easy money? All you have to do is spend a couple of minutes reading eight statements that challenge your point of view on a political issue. Who would turn down that offer?According to revealing new research, the answer is: most of us.Our desire “to avoid listening to people with opposing ideals” is stronger than we realize, writes a research team led by University of Winnipeg psychologist Jeremy Frimer. It reports this pull is equally strong for liberals and conservatives, is not limited to Americans, and is rooted in deep-seated psychological needs.It’s long been clear that politically minded people have a tendency to retreat into their respective ideological enclaves — which is all too easy to do today, thanks to cable television and the Internet. In the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Frimer and colleagues Linda Skitka and Matt Motyl explore the origins of this democracy-endangering impulse.They describe a series of experiments, the first of which featured 202 Americans recruited online. After indicating whether they supported or opposed same-sex marriage, participants were given two options.They could read a series of statements that supported their position, and answer some simple questions indicating they understood the basic arguments. Once they finished, they would automatically be entered into a drawing to win $7.Or they could read a series of statements supporting the opposite position, and complete the same simple procedure. In that case, they’d be entered into a drawing to win $10.“Sixty-three percent of participants chose to give up a chance at $3 to avoid hearing from the other side,” the researchers report. The numbers were quite similar for people on opposite sides of the issue: 64 percent of same-sex marriage supporters passed up the chance to read an opposing viewpoint, as did 61 percent of opponents.We need to acknowledge the depths of our differences, and accept the discomfort of having our assumptions challenged.The researchers repeated the experiment with another set of 245 Americans and got the same results: Sixty-one percent of supporters and 63 percent of opponents chose not to read the views of people on the other side, thereby passing up the possibility of winning more money.Additional studies found this same dynamic applied when asking about other issues and personalities, and among Canadians as well as Americans. What’s more, “we also found greater desire to hear from like- vs. unlike-minded others on questions such as preferred beverages (Coke vs. Pepsi), seasons (spring vs. autumn), airplane seats (aisle vs. window), and sports league (NFL vs. NBA),” the researchers write.So why do we have so little curiosity about how other people think? Primer and his colleagues addressed that question with a final study that returned to the same-sex marriage issue. Participants — 236 Americans — were asked “How interested are you in hearing someone tell you all about why he/she believes that same-sex marriage should (or should not) be legal?”After they gave their answer on a scale of negative 100 (very uninterested) to 100 (very interested), all were asked “Why do you feel that way?” To tease out an accurate answer, they were presented with a series of statements and asked the degree to which each reflected their feelings. These included the assertions that hearing an opposing viewpoint would “cause me to feel angry,” “require a lot of effort on my part,” “likely result in a fight,” and “harm my relationship with the speaker.”The researchers found participants avoided hearing out the other side for two basic reasons. They feared doing so “would create cognitive dissonance” — the psychological discomfort that arises from simultaneously holding two opposing beliefs. And they felt it would “undermine a shared reality with the speaker” — that is, disrupt the comforting delusion that we hold similar values.So, seriously considering the views of people whose views are shaped by different ethical frameworks requires us to step out of our comfort zones in a very real way. We need to acknowledge the depths of our differences, and accept the discomfort of having our assumptions challenged.The future of our democracy may depend on whether enough of us can summon the courage required to do just that.
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Self-esteem among narcissists is 'puffed up, but shaky'

Self-esteem among narcissists is 'puffed up, but shaky' | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Like a grotesque mask reflected in a pool, narcissism has two faces, neither of them attractive. Narcissists have an inflated sense of self-worth, seeing themselves as superior beings who are entitled…
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The True Meaning of Nostalgia

The True Meaning of Nostalgia | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
Michael Chabon on how nostalgia and history play into his work, especially in “Moonglow” and “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay.”
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Smell may shape human memories

Smell may shape human memories | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
The discovery may provide a means to detect early problems with memory formation and memory retrieval in the brain.
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Five pitfalls of behavioural economics - SmartCompany

Five pitfalls of behavioural economics - SmartCompany | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
I was recently interviewed for a piece on how businesses were using behavioural economics, and where they were going wrong. While there’s plenty of upside in applying behavioural science, there are five pitfalls that you should know about so you can enjoy the spoils and avoid the foils. 1. Thinking it only applies to customers …
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Social media: In praise of serendipity | The Economist

Social media: In praise of serendipity | The Economist | BehaviourWorks threads | Scoop.it
#Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media. By Cass Sunstein. Princeton University Press; 310 pages; $29.95 and £24.95.
LAST June Facebook announced a change to its newsfeed. Henceforth it would rejig the way stories were ranked to ensure that people saw “the stories they find most meaningful”.
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