Behaviour Management
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Discipline by Design

Discipline by Design | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it

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Molly Carlson's curator insight, December 2, 2013 7:31 PM

This is a website with eleven different techniques on how to manage a classroom. These techniques are focusing, direct instruction, monitoring, modeling, non-verbal cuing, environmental control, low-profile intervention, assertive discipline, assertive I-messages, humanistic I-messages, and positive discipline. Each of these techniques is explained in a very understandable way and there are even examples for all of them.  

I do not think I agree with one of the methods used for low-profile intervention. “While lecturing to her class this teacher makes effective use of namedropping. If she sees a student talking or off task, she simply drops the youngster’s name into her dialogue in a natural way. ‘And you see, David, we carry the one to the tens column.’ David hears his name and is drawn back on task. The rest of the class doesn’t seem to notice.” In my schooling year, if a teacher said a student’s name at any point it meant they were being called out and all attention went on them. If I was ever called out in a “natural way” I would become thoroughly embarrassed and my attention would move further away from the teacher. I feel like students need a way to be corrected that does not bring about attention from others, especially if the problem is a very minor one. I also do not like the nickel bell example used for non-verbal cuing. As a student hearing the bell brought fear into my heart. I feel like there are better methods for getting student’s attention then ringing a loud bell. I do agree that non-verbal cuing is important, but the way in which that is done can determine the successfulness of it.

I really like the idea of positive disciple. I have been a part of and observed too many schools in which the teachers are always yelling at their students and loudly telling students everything that they are doing wrong. I personally believe that a positive classroom experience allows the student to feel safer so they can learn better. I like the quote that says, “Instead of ‘no-running in the room,’ use ‘move through the building in an orderly manner.” I feel like this still gives the same message, but the one is spoken in a very understanding and kind way as the other seems like an order and more rules to follow. 

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Report: Teachers Aren't Trained to Praise Their Students

Report: Teachers Aren't Trained to Praise Their Students | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
A new study finds that education schools aren't teaching classroom management strategies in a focused way.

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Molly Carlson's curator insight, December 10, 2013 1:51 PM

This article is about how teachers are taught and encouraged to do things other than encourage their students and there is a lack of proper training. One study written about here says that they, “studied the curricula at the 122 undergraduate and graduate teaching programs and found that nearly all address classroom management, but that most do not do some comprehensively… ‘Instruction and practice on classroom management strategies are often scattered throughout the curriculum, rarely receiving the connected and concentrated focus they deserve.’” I find this very scary and worrisome that the schools are not relaying the management information to their students but rather throwing tidbits here and there. I feel like if classroom management is seen as such a huge issue in today’s schooling then why not put a greater emphasis on it when the students are in schools.

 

Another major part of this article is how encouraging students is not being emphasized to teachers. “According to this chart, education programs put much more emphasis on showing new teachers how to make rules and routines than on how to encourage students for a job well done.” I think it is the most important job of a teacher to encourage the students while they are learning so they can gain a lifelong love of learning. If the teachers are not encouraging their students, I feel like then the students are just going to feel forced into doing the work and not actually like doing it. The joy of learning and school will be taken away from a young age. I think that teachers should put a major emphasis on this encouragement, even if it means taking some emphasis away from rules. 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:15 PM

Is this something we need to be trained for?

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Behavior Management Strategies, Lesson Planning, ADHD

Behavior Management Strategies, Lesson Planning, ADHD fEh: .Reu http://t.co/qkR0z3Up...

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Child Behavior Management: Positive Behaviors - ChildUp ...

Child Behavior Management: Positive Behaviors - ChildUp ... | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it

ChildUp - online parenting class helps children develop highly valuable habits necessary to live a well balanced, happy and social life. Author: amethder.


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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, March 19, 11:22 AM

THANK YOU FOR VIEWING SHARING AND RESPONDING THANK YOU FOR CARING

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Students with Disability and School-wide Behavior Programs

Research has also shown that positive behavioral interventions are more effective if they are used for all students; not only for students who experience forms of disabilities. Positive behavioral interventions should be applied ...

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Positive Discipline Strategies Yield Quick Results

Positive Discipline Strategies Yield Quick Results | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
Positive Discipline Strategies Yield Quick Results ([Video Break] Watch how positive discipline strategies yield quick results: http://t.co/jeOSNYgnd4 #classroom #behavior)...

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Classroom Discipline Resources

Many teachers, especially new teachers, struggle with classroom discipline. Here are great techniques and resources to help educators out with classroom management.

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Should I use a class-wide reward system?

Should I use a class-wide reward system? | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it

Reward systems have generated a great deal of controversy.  They may not be needed if:  the teacher is seasoned; the classroom management, discipline and organization plan is “tight”; most of the kids do well most of the time.  If this is NOT the case, a system for acknowledging the RIGHT behaviors may be warranted. 

 

It is advised, however, that teachers using a class-wide system consider FIRST looking at the relationships they have formed with the individuals; second, review   the classroom management, discipline and organization plan.  Fixing the real problem will be needed sooner or later if things are going to get better. 


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Classroom Management and Discipline

This section covers all the major discipline strategies for teachers. Assertive Discipline, Reality Therapy, Discipline with Dignity, and Transactional Analysis are some of the theories that are covered.

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The Classroom Discipline Blog

The Classroom Discipline Blog keeps you up to date with all the additions and changes to the teaching-strategies-for-classroom-discipline.com Web site. Subscribe here.

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Discipline Is the Problem, Not the Solution

articles by alfie kohn

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JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 12, 2013 2:46 PM

This article was written by Alfie Kohn for Learning Magazine in 1995.  His position is that teachers ask themselves the wrong questions and try to address the wrong problems when looking at student behavior.  Rather than asking himself or herself how do I get this kid to settle down and work, but what’s the task that's not engaging him?  Another area is when students demonstrate undesired behavior, teachers should reflect on the climate of the classroom they have helped to create.  Another way to discipline students that Kohn supports is engaging the students in the thinking for themselves by asking the children to think to themselves how long it takes them to get settled, why, and what we can do about that.  Kohn says the whole field of classroom management only amounts to various techniques for manipulating student behavior.

 

I am intrigued by Kohn's perspective.  His article isn't exactly opposed to discipline, rather he suggests the most effective way to get students to display desired behavior is to help them think through when they should act a certain way.  When the children think their behavior is their idea for the good of the classroom, they are more likely to comply.  I am just getting into discipline strategies and ideology of classroom discipline, so I can't speak to best practice for discipline, but I feel, in general, discipline has to be very individualized.

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School Discipline: How Are Happiness and Learning Connected?

School Discipline: How Are Happiness and Learning Connected? | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
We've all heard of the fight or flight response. We go into survival mode when threatened by something or someone.

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, October 9, 2013 12:13 PM

We need to cultivate a safe and harmonious learning environment that invites vulnerability and genuine inquiry

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Times editorial: Rethink 'zero tolerance' discipline policies

Times editorial: Rethink 'zero tolerance' discipline policies | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
Times editorial: Rethink 'zero tolerance' discipline policies
Syracuse.com
The task force, which meets behind closed doors, is operating under the shadow of an investigation by the state Attorney General's Office for its discipline practices.

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:59 AM

While zero tolerance is a broad blanket,  this and other studies decry specifically harsh punishment for small infractions. Keeping kids in school is the goal.

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Teaching Maths with Meaning: Why I Will Never Use A Behaviour Chart Again - Linky

Teaching Maths with Meaning: Why I Will Never Use A Behaviour Chart Again - Linky | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it

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Molly Carlson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 9:18 PM

This is a blog about how one teacher will never use a behavior chart. She explains how this is a one size fits all method for classroom management and did not work well for all children because some students never changed positions but once they did they would cry. She shows how this is not personal enough to make an actual impact because each student and class is different and has different needs. In this specific classroom, “we have a class essential agreement – we came up with together what we want our classroom to look like. Everything is listed in a positive way. We refer back to it when we need to.”  I really like how this method because it is now personal for the class and everyone is on board with the expectations. I love the fact that the expectations are written in a positive way. I think there is too much negativity in schools from teachers yelling and their not being enough encouragement, so this way the students can think about what they are supposed to do instead of what they are not allowed to do. I am currently tutoring at an elementary school and the teachers yell at the students too often causing the students to be afraid of the teachers instead of the teacher being seen as a supporter in the learning process. Because of how this is written, I think it positively reinforces good behavior instead of disciplining bad behavior. This related to the article explaining the different types of teachers who either manage or discipline through the way that the disciplining teacher just has sets of tricks to get the job done instead of actually relating to the students. This chart allows the teacher to be more of a managing teacher than a disciplining one.   

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Positive Reinforcement Examples In Shaping Kids Behavior | modernfamilylife.net

Positive Reinforcement Examples In Shaping Kids Behavior | modernfamilylife.net | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
Positive Reinforcement Examples In Shaping Kids Behavior shows you the various ways to implement positive reinforcement in encouraging good kids behavior.

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Sandra Duplisea's curator insight, July 14, 2013 10:44 PM

4.05 Positive Reinforcement

Audrey Prescott's curator insight, April 13, 2014 9:47 AM

This article is perfect in helping you better understand positive behavior management methods - awesome resource.

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Help For Kids With Behavior Problems – Tips And Strategies ...

By Robert Winterson. Defiant behavior is often a numbing experience for many parents. They are usually sucked into an argument or feel that they have lost control. This is just one of the many consequences of the fairly large ...


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What is SWPBS?

What is SWPBS? | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it

What is SWPBS? (Annual conference happening now!


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Audrey Prescott's curator insight, April 13, 2014 9:49 AM

SWPBS is a positive behavior management method, from this article I want you to answer:

 

What is SWPBS?

What is your role as a student in the SWPBS?

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The Hidden Power Of The Compliment | Internet Millionaire Articles

Positive reinforcement is a tactic every parent knows well, because recognizing someone's efforts and achievements is one of the simplest, yet most effective ways to reinforce positive behavior patterns and to empower them.

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5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline

5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
Something I have come to know is that effective schools take a thoughtful approach to student discipline. Admittedly, there are some who believe student behaviour will take care of itself; that we'...

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, June 10, 2013 9:50 PM

Great insight! 

JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:33 AM

Tom Schimmer shares five guiding principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline in his article posted February 7, 2013.  He starts out by stating that effective schools take a thoughtful approach to student discipline.  He says increasing overall level of student engagement will reduce negative behaviors.  The principles are as follows:

1. Every school-wide discipline plan is designed to be an instrument of support and inclusion, not removal and isolation.

2. Be clear about expected behaviors and what success can/should look like.

3. Be reasonable, consistent, and air when responding to inappropriate behaviors.

4. Pre-correct for anticipated behavioral errors.

5. Respect the uniqueness of each student, each incident, and each set of circumstances.

 

I really wanted to include this article because discipline in the schools is not limited to just the classroom.  The culture of the schools sets the tone for the way students and teachers act.  I appreciate how the said schools have to be thoughtful about how they approach discipline.  As soon as discipline becomes an after thought, students will get reckless.  Principles four and five stood out the most to me.  I think good schools anticipate when bad behavior might occur, not because they think their student are bad but simply through years of experience dealing with such things.  Pre-correcting or letting the student know that this is not the expectations and spelling out the consequences is a great way to minimize bad behavior in one fell swoop.  The fifth concept of uniqueness is really important to me.  Each child is different and there is never a one size fits all discipline policy and procedure.  Circumstances and motivation are always different and each incident should be considered individually.  It's important to have the school wide discipline policies act as support and aid to the teachers’ policies in the classroom, I feel they should never be in conflict.  This was my only curated sources that dealt with school-wide discipline, but I think some of the other principles outlined in the other items curated would work on a school wide level, too.

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Treasured Tip - CHAMPS Classroom Organizaion, Discipline, Management

Treasured Tip - CHAMPS Classroom Organizaion, Discipline, Management | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it

A 4th grade teacher's blog regarding her experience with CHAMPS for classroom management, discipline and organization.  CHAMPS is by Randy Sprick's Safe and Civil Schools.  It incorporates best practices in a framework that guides while allowing teachers to individualize to their classroom.  Teachers leave with a succinct classroom management plan . 

 

Engaging kids can't happen without the fundamentals of a well oiled machine!


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JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 13, 2013 7:39 PM

This Teacher's Treasure blog was posted October 30, 2011.  It features a book called CHAMPS Classroom Management.  CHAMPS stands for Conversation, Help, Activity Movement, Participation, and Success.  The book also features the acronym SLANT which stands for Sit Up, Learn forward, Activate your thinking, Note important information, and Track the talker (or the Teacher).   The article asks teaches to teach their expectations regarding how to be successful within the structure that they have created.  Correcting misbehavior fluently is another main point in the article.  The blogger also concluded it seemed high maintenance and tough to keep up with on a daily basis.

 

According to the suggestions in this blog, good teachers are involved.  This is consistent with the discipline policies outlined in my other posts.  Although the book outlines this in more detail, teachers can develop an effective classroom plan that is proactive, positive, and instructional.  I like the concept of CHAMPS because it seems to me like they are all very obvious components of good classroom management, but when you speak them and have the kids speak them, they take ownership over them and it becomes a concrete expectation, in my opinion.  I think the strategies outlined in this book, especially SLANT will give a classroom the edge over others because these principles really encourage actively engaging the students; minds and bodies.  I am not totally sold on it because it does seem like a lot to keep up with, but I can see introducing it around December into the classroom once it starts getting excited about Christmas time coming up and seeing if the strategies are effective for classroom management.

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Managing Student Conduct - Successfully Managing Student Conduct

Managing Student Conduct - Successfully Managing Student Conduct | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
Managing student conduct can seem scary, especially to newer teachers. However, it is one of the main tasks teachers have in order to maintain an academic classroom environment.

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Positive Classroom Discipline - Chapter 18, Discipline Management as an Integrated System

Discipline, Tools for Teaching, positive discipline, classroom management, staff development, professional development, new teacher training, Title One, new teacher induction, teacher training, effective teaching, teacher workshops, no child left ...

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Getting Tough on Classroom Discipline

Getting Tough on Classroom Discipline | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
The petty classroom annoyances that were almost charming little obstacles to be overcome in early September now seem to be huge hurdles as discouraged teachers wonder if we will ever make the kind of profound changes in our students that we dreamed...

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JennaMRyan's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:21 PM

This is a six-part article on getting tough on classroom discipline.  The articles include an introductory page, moving toward self-discipline, teaching student how to monitor themselves, questions that can encourage self-discipline, focused on student strengths, and simple activities to boost self-esteem.  This resources supports self discipline saying to teachers that when students can monitor themselves, you no longer have to assume the role of the overbearing adult in the classroom.  Some suggestions for encouraging self-discipline are paying your students compliments, make eye contact, have students share hidden talents, set goals, ask for student advice, and use your class's personality for debate and discussion.  Finally, this article offers suggestions to improve self-esteem such as taking pictures and making a wall of fame.

 

I like that this resource on discipline talks more about how to create a positive classroom atmosphere and improve students' self esteem rather than strategies for how to come down on them.  I love the suggestions for discussions to have with your students to involve them in creating the environment of the classroom and I liked the suggestions for things I can actually do as positive behavior intervention strategies.  I feel like this resource connects to Alfie Kohn's ideas because it also says the best way to discipline kids is to let them do the disciplining and ask them guiding questions so they can come to the solution on their own.

liam bye's curator insight, October 2, 2015 11:22 PM

This article stretches over a number of different factors that can contribute to effective classroom management. Such as positive reinforcement, boosting self esteem, reflective strategies and student centred discipline.   

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Punishment vs. compassion: A tale of two principals - Social Justice Solutions

Punishment vs. compassion: A tale of two principals - Social Justice Solutions | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
Punishment vs. compassion: A tale of two principals
Social Justice Solutions
His school, Lincoln High, was much like Killarney Secondary. In fact, one can argue it was worse.

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, September 19, 2013 12:51 AM

This is certainly food for thought on how to create order from chaos. Which method is your school using? Is it working?

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5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline

5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline | Behaviour Management | Scoop.it
Something I have come to know is that effective schools take a thoughtful approach to student discipline. Admittedly, there are some who believe student behaviour will take care of itself; that we'...

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, November 14, 2013 11:16 AM

Effective discipline always takes planning. Schimmer gives us some ideas to help with that.