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Troppe diagnosi di disturbo bipolare errate. Anche il DSM se ne accorge

Troppe diagnosi di disturbo bipolare errate. Anche il DSM se ne accorge | beginner | Scoop.it

In questi ultimi anni stiamo assistendo a un incredibile aumento delle diagnosi di disturbo bipolare da parte della psichiatria internazionale: se ne sono accorti persino gli americani che nel loro tristemente famoso DSM-V hanno modificato, almeno per gli adolescenti, questa tendenza". Lo afferma il professor Alessandro Salvini, già ordinario di psicologia clinica all'università degli studi di Padova. "Secondo il DSM-V per fare diagnosi di disturbo bipolare - dice Salvini - si devono alternare fasi depressive e fasi maniacali che prevedano almeno tre sintomi tra cui ipertrofia dell'ego, spese considerevoli, manie di grandezza". Per Salvini ci sono quadri depressivi "semplicemente reattivi a eventi della vita che si ripetono senza mania: è chiaro che, quando il soggetto esce dalla depressione, riprende a vivere le cose con gusto ma non per questo è maniacale". "Ci sono poi i temperamenti ciclotimici - prosegue Salvini - che non sono certo un quadro psicopatologico. Interessi miliardari girano intorno a questa patologia che certo esiste, ma in misura assai minore di come viene presentata. Purtroppo la discussione su questi temi in Italia viene impedita dalle lobbies che gestiscono il mercato farmaceutico". A cura di Federico Baranzini www.psicoterapeuta-a-milano.it


Via Federico Baranzini - www.federicobaranzini.it, Ennio Martignago
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Mini-pancreas grown from stem cells has implications for future insulin delivery

Mini-pancreas grown from stem cells has implications for future insulin delivery | beginner | Scoop.it

Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:02 AM

In a paper, published in Development journal, researchers from the  Danish Stem Cell Centre have shown that they can culture mouse pancreatic cells into expanded, branched structures in a 3D culture.

By manipulating the medium composition they  generated either hollow spheres, which are mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors, or complex organoids that spontaneously undergo pancreatic morphogenesis and differentiation.

Manipulation and improvement of  culture and expansion techniques 

 could lead to a more efficient and  developed method of creating insulin-releasing beta cells, which will eventually be used for cell therapy of diabetes.

http://dev.biologists.org/content/140/21/4452.full

 

To learn about pancreatic development:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/in-vivo-development/pancreas

 

To learn about stem cells differentiation protocols:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation/protocols

 

 

Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:04 PM

Another wonder result from tissue engineering!

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Meeting the mammal that survived the dinosaurs

Meeting the mammal that survived the dinosaurs | beginner | Scoop.it
So, here I am, running in a forest at night over 2,000 miles from home. This forest—dry, stout, and thorny enough to draw blood—lies just a few miles north of a rural town in the western edge of the Dominican Republic on the border with Haiti.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Climate change: forecast for 2100 is floods and heat ... and it's man's fault - Telegraph

Climate change: forecast for 2100 is floods and heat ... and it's man's fault  - Telegraph | beginner | Scoop.it
Climate scientists have concluded that temperatures could jump by up to 9F (5C) and sea levels could rise by up to 2ft 8ins (82cm) by the end of the century, according to a leaked draft of a United Nations report.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Centre for Climate Safety's curator insight, August 17, 2013 5:56 AM

5°C = destruction and misery, and most likely a runaway global warming situation. It is path towards a 10 metre sea level rise, fresh water and agriculture crisis, armed conflicts, deaths counted in the million. http://climatesafety.info/?page_id=2

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, August 17, 2013 9:00 AM

Where's Noah when you need him?

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3D Fractals in Motion: Meet the Animated Mandelbulb

3D Fractals in Motion: Meet the Animated Mandelbulb | beginner | Scoop.it

In the world of fractals, the Mandelbrot Set is a stunning geometrical shape that results when you take a particular equation and apply it to a number, and then to the result, and then to each subsequent result after, ad infinitum. But what happens when you go from two dimensions to three? You get a “Mandelbulb.” And if you want to see how such a shape evolves over time, check out this stunning computer animation of a Mandelbulb modeling the movement of 250,000,000 particles.

Video of the Week #87, April 10th, 2013:

From: Meet the Mandelbulb by Jennifer Ouellette at Cocktail Party Physics.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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oliviersc's comment, April 23, 2013 12:48 PM
Trop long à charger ; Viméo rame...
jaber repon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 1:35 PM

tanku for<a hrfef=" http://monshaschoolandcollege.blogspot.com/"world </a>

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Harvard researchers discover hormon that spurs beta cell production. Monthly alternative to insulin?

Harvard researchers discover hormon that spurs beta cell production. Monthly alternative to insulin? | beginner | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have discovered a hormone that holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, a metabolic illness afflicting an estimated 26 million Americans. It could eventually mean that instead of taking insulin injections three times a day, you might take an injection of this hormone once a week or once a month, or in the best case maybe even once a year,” said Doug Melton (right). Melton and postdoctoral fellow Peng Yi discovered the hormone betatrophin, which has the potential to improve diabetes treatment.

 

Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have discovered a hormone that holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, a metabolic illness afflicting an estimated 26 million Americans. The researchers believe that the hormone might also have a role in treating type 1, or juvenile, diabetes.

 

The hormone, called betatrophin, causes mice to produce insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells at up to 30 times the normal rate. The new beta cells only produce insulin when called for by the body, offering the potential for the natural regulation of insulin and a great reduction in the complications associated with diabetes, the leading medical cause of amputations and non-genetic loss of vision.

 

The researchers who discovered betatrophin, HSCI co-director Doug Meltonand postdoctoral fellow Peng Yi, caution that much work remains to be done before it could be used as a treatment in humans. But the results of their work, which was supported in large part by a federal research grant, already have attracted the attention of drug manufacturers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Biosciencia's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:10 AM

The work was published today by the journal Cell as an early online release.

CAEXI BEST's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:34 PM
Les chercheurs de Harvard viennent de  découvrir une hormone qui stimule la production de cellules bêta. Remplacement mensuel à l'insuline?
Center for Accessible Living NKY's curator insight, May 6, 2013 12:28 AM

More on the new possible treatment for juvenile diabetes.

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T-Cell Therapy Eradicates an Aggressive Leukemia in Two Children

T-Cell Therapy Eradicates an Aggressive Leukemia in Two Children | beginner | Scoop.it

Two children with an aggressive form of childhood leukemia had a complete remission of their disease—showing no evidence of cancer cells in their bodies—after treatment with a novel cell therapy that reprogrammed their immune cells to rapidly multiply and destroy leukemia cells. A research team from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania published the case report of two pediatric patients Online First today in The New England Journal of Medicine. It will appear in the April 18 print issue.

 

The current study builds on Grupp’s ongoing collaboration with Penn Medicine scientists who originally developed the modified T cells as a treatment for B-cell leukemias. The Penn team reported on early successful results of a trial using this cell therapy in three adult chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients in August of 2011. Two of those patients remain in remission more than 2&frac12; years following their treatment, and as the Penn researchers reported in December 2012 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, seven out of ten adult patients treated at that point responded to the therapy. The team is led by the current study’s senior author, Carl H. June, M.D., the Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy in the department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and director of Translational Research in Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center.

 

“We’re hopeful that our efforts to treat patients with these personalized cellular therapies will reduce or even replace the need for bone marrow transplants, which carry a high mortality risk and require long hospitalizations,” June said. “In the long run, if the treatment is effective in these late-stage patients, we would like to explore using it up front, and perhaps arrive at a point where leukemia can be treated without chemotherapy.”

 

The research team colleagues adapted the original CLL treatment to combat another B-cell leukemia: ALL, which is the most common childhood cancer. After decades of research, oncologists can currently cure 85 percent of children with ALL. Both children in the current study had a high-risk type of ALL that stubbornly resists conventional treatments.

The new study used a relatively new approach in cancer treatment: immunotherapy, which manipulates the immune system to increase its cancer-fighting capabilities. Here the researchers engineered T cells to selectively kill another type of immune cell called B cells, which had become cancerous.

 

The researchers removed some of each patient’s own T cells and modified them in the laboratory to create a type of CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) cell called a CTL019 cell. These cells are designed to attack a protein called CD19 that occurs only on the surface of certain B cells.

 

By creating an antibody that recognizes CD19 and then connecting that antibody to T cells, the researchers created in CTL019 cells a sort of guided missile that locks in on and kills B cells, thereby attacking B-cell leukemia. After being returned to the patient’s body, the CTL019 cells multiply a thousand times over and circulate throughout the body. Importantly, they persist for months afterward, guarding against a recurrence of this specific type of leukemia.

 

While the CTL019 cells eliminate leukemia, they also can generate an overactive immune response, called a cytokine release syndrome, involving dangerously high fever, low blood pressure, and other side effects. This complication was especially severe in Emily, and her hospital team needed to provide her with treatments that rapidly relieved the treatment-related symptoms by blunting the immune overresponse, while still preserving the modified T cells’ anti-leukemia activity.

 

“The comprehensive testing plan that we have put in place to study patients’ blood and bone marrow while they’re undergoing this therapy is allowing us to be able to follow how the T cells are behaving in patients in real time, and guides us to be able to design more detailed and specific experiments to answer critical questions that come up from our studies,” Kalos said.

 

The CTL019 therapy eliminates all B cells that carry the CD19 cell receptor: healthy cells as well as those with leukemia. Patients can live without B cells, although they require regular replacement infusions of immunoglobulin, which can be given at home, to perform the immune function normally provided by B cells.

 

The research team continues to refine their approach using this new technology and explore reasons why some patients may not respond to the therapy or may experience a recurrence of their disease. Grupp said the appearance of the CD19-negative leukemia cells in the second child may have resulted from her prior treatments. Unlike Emily, the second patient had received an umbilical cord cell transplant from a matched donor, so her engineered T cells were derived from her donor (transplanted) cells, with no additional side effects. Oncologists had previously treated her with blinatumomab, a monoclonal antibody, in hopes of fighting the cancer. The prior treatments may have selectively favored a population of CD19-negative T cells.

 

“The emergence of tumor cells that no longer contain the target protein suggests that in particular patients with high-risk ALL, we may need to broaden the treatment to include additional T cells that may go after additional targets,” added Grupp. “However, the initial results with this immune-based approach are encouraging, and may later even be developed into treatments for other types of cancer.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Soumya Rao's comment, May 1, 2013 5:17 AM
Wow... really amazing!!! Hope it transforms lives soon...
Nacho Vega's curator insight, May 1, 2013 1:58 PM

YES we CAN!!!

Nacho Vega's comment, May 1, 2013 2:02 PM
YES we CAN!
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Nasce in Germania il Foodsharing

Nasce in Germania il Foodsharing | beginner | Scoop.it
È una piattaforma web che unisce chi ha avanzi in cucina con chi fa fatica ad arrivare a fine mese: un progetto per sconfiggere gli sprechi e ridurre l'immondizia
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Intelligenza umana a rischio? | Gaianews.it

Intelligenza umana a rischio? | Gaianews.it | beginner | Scoop.it

Un'ipotesi provocatoria pubblicata sul giornale Cell Press suggerisce che stiamo perdendo le nostre capacità intellettuali ed emotive, perché l'intricata rete di geni di cui è dotato il nostro cervello non continua ad affinarsi, nella nostra società...


Via Ennio Martignago
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Scientists generate 281-gigapixel cell map using electron microscope

Scientists generate 281-gigapixel cell map using electron microscope | beginner | Scoop.it

Electron microscopes can produce incredibly detailed and even 3D views of sub-cellular structures, but often at the cost of losing the bigger picture. Researchers at Leiden University in the Netherlands, however, have leveraged a technique called virtual nanoscopy that enables researchers to observe the whole of a cell and its intricate details in a single image. With the method, the team stitches together nanometer resolution photographs of what's gone under the scope to create a map with adjustable zoom a la Google Maps. Their study created a 281-gigapixel image (packed with 16 million pixels per inch) of a 1.5-millimeter-long zebrafish embryo.


Via Anne Osterrieder, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Scientific Inquiry Among the Preschool Set

While playing, preschoolers are actually behaving like scientists, according to a new report: forming hypotheses, running experiments, calculating probabilities.
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Vitamin E may slow early Alzheimer's decline: study

Taking vitamin E during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease slowed declines in patients' ability to perform basic tasks by about six months in a new study.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, January 3, 2014 1:44 PM

VItamin E for Alzheimers-no known side effects observed to date

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Twitter va devenir accessible aux téléphones sans internet

Twitter va devenir accessible aux téléphones sans internet | beginner | Scoop.it

À l'instar de Facebook et son application allégée, Facebook for Every Phone, Twitter s'est associé à l'entreprise U2opia mobile pour développer une application accessible aux feature phones. De quoi être présent dans de très nombreux pays.


Via Tolokonnikoff - Seratoo , Ennio Martignago
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Quel avenir avenir pour le photojournalisme ? Du côté des photographes…

Quel avenir avenir pour le photojournalisme ? Du côté des photographes… | beginner | Scoop.it

Du 31 août au 9 septembre, (presque) tous les yeux sont tournés vers Perpignan : la 25e édition du festival Visa pour l’Image s’y déroule. L’occasion, comme chaque année, d’y faire un bilan entre professionnels. Depuis plusieurs années, la profession souffre à cause de la crise de la presse, et même de la crise tout court. Baisse des commandes, précarité des photojournalistes, crises des agences et des publications, le moral n’y est pas, et l’argent non plus. Cette année,Our Age Is Thirteen souhaite ouvrir les perspectives en posant une question aux acteurs de la profession : « Qu’imaginez-vous pour l’avenir du photojournalisme ? »


Via Mario Pires
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3D Fractals in Motion: Meet the Animated Mandelbulb

3D Fractals in Motion: Meet the Animated Mandelbulb | beginner | Scoop.it

In the world of fractals, the Mandelbrot Set is a stunning geometrical shape that results when you take a particular equation and apply it to a number, and then to the result, and then to each subsequent result after, ad infinitum. But what happens when you go from two dimensions to three? You get a “Mandelbulb.” And if you want to see how such a shape evolves over time, check out this stunning computer animation of a Mandelbulb modeling the movement of 250,000,000 particles.

Video of the Week #87, April 10th, 2013:

From: Meet the Mandelbulb by Jennifer Ouellette at Cocktail Party Physics.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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oliviersc's comment, April 23, 2013 12:48 PM
Trop long à charger ; Viméo rame...
jaber repon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 1:35 PM

tanku for<a hrfef=" http://monshaschoolandcollege.blogspot.com/"world </a>

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Harvard researchers discover hormon that spurs beta cell production. Monthly alternative to insulin?

Harvard researchers discover hormon that spurs beta cell production. Monthly alternative to insulin? | beginner | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have discovered a hormone that holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, a metabolic illness afflicting an estimated 26 million Americans. It could eventually mean that instead of taking insulin injections three times a day, you might take an injection of this hormone once a week or once a month, or in the best case maybe even once a year,” said Doug Melton (right). Melton and postdoctoral fellow Peng Yi discovered the hormone betatrophin, which has the potential to improve diabetes treatment.

 

Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have discovered a hormone that holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, a metabolic illness afflicting an estimated 26 million Americans. The researchers believe that the hormone might also have a role in treating type 1, or juvenile, diabetes.

 

The hormone, called betatrophin, causes mice to produce insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells at up to 30 times the normal rate. The new beta cells only produce insulin when called for by the body, offering the potential for the natural regulation of insulin and a great reduction in the complications associated with diabetes, the leading medical cause of amputations and non-genetic loss of vision.

 

The researchers who discovered betatrophin, HSCI co-director Doug Meltonand postdoctoral fellow Peng Yi, caution that much work remains to be done before it could be used as a treatment in humans. But the results of their work, which was supported in large part by a federal research grant, already have attracted the attention of drug manufacturers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Biosciencia's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:10 AM

The work was published today by the journal Cell as an early online release.

CAEXI BEST's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:34 PM
Les chercheurs de Harvard viennent de  découvrir une hormone qui stimule la production de cellules bêta. Remplacement mensuel à l'insuline?
Center for Accessible Living NKY's curator insight, May 6, 2013 12:28 AM

More on the new possible treatment for juvenile diabetes.

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the garden: underwater sculpture garden

the garden: underwater sculpture garden | beginner | Scoop.it
Always on the lookout for unusual garden sculptures to share with you, I came across what I believe to be one of the most beautiful sculpture gardens around. Devoid of the usual outdoor elements of sound and smell all you ...
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Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2012

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2012 | beginner | Scoop.it
The Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, founded in 1964, is an annual international showcase for the very best nature photography...

Via lilliam menendez
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Giuliano Cipollari's curator insight, February 16, 2013 9:21 AM

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Miss Paulley's curator insight, February 25, 2013 8:36 AM

Exposing students to aspects of nature and the outdoors is a great way to provide inspiration within all different subject areas. Showing students pictures of nature can provide inspiration for visual arts, music, drama, or even movement. Students can also use pictures such as these within subjects such as science or mathematics for problem solving type activities. Integration with outdoor education and many other subject areas is possible, even without leaving the classroom!

Rescooped by Cristina Merlo from Costrutti e Connessioni
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Lo sciamano è un "sapiente" come noi

"C'è chi lo vede come uno psicopatico, chi come un miracolista, ma è uno come noi" Intervista a Pierluigi Lattuada realizzata al Convegno "La via della guarigione - Sapienza sciamanica e medicina moderna" organizzato dall'Associazione Cultu...


Via Ennio Martignago
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Il cambiamento, un'esperienza che si ripete

Il cambiamento, un'esperienza che si ripete » Articoli, trattati e scritti riguardanti la psicologia, la psicoterapia, la PNL e le scienze sociali.

Via Ennio Martignago
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Sulcis, terminata l'occupazione della miniera La decisione dopo il vertice a Roma - Cronaca

Sulcis, terminata l'occupazione della miniera La decisione dopo il vertice a Roma - Cronaca | beginner | Scoop.it
I minatori della Carbosulcis hanno sospeso l'occupazione dei pozzi di Nuraxi Figus, a 373 metri sotto terra.
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