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Is it better to drink beer or coffee at work?

Is it better to drink beer or coffee at work? | LifeBank | Scoop.it
The brain works dramatically differently when you drink beer versus when you drink coffee, but should you really drink either at work?

Via Russ Bergeron
Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

Pubs should start holding 'ideas' nights!

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Russ Bergeron's curator insight, September 26, 2013 5:07 PM

Not sure, but definitely worth an experiment.

 

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Ten digital trust challenges

Ten digital trust challenges | LifeBank | Scoop.it

As technology continues to change our lives and the way we work, PwC highlights 10 digital trust challenges that institutions must grow new capabilities to address.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

There is no Digital trust.  A few years ago, there was.  I think we've all had enough now of our data being prostituted and our privacy being raped.  Harsh, but fair.  The issues are clear - PWC articulates them well.  What we're missing though is the solution, and that's why platforms like LifeBank exist, to provide an end-to-end solution to this enormous problem  When I say, "end-to-end" - what do I mean?  Well, LifeBank has developed a whole new standard for Consent Management, that ensures that we individuals are at the heart of our own data, that gives us the control in granting permissions to access our private data to suit us, including when and what data exactly.  LifeBank has also developed this for every industry, every language, every business function, in every country, globally.  So, yeah, I'd pretty much say, "end-to-end," is accurate

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VTech alters terms and conditions to avoid blame if it is hacked again

VTech alters terms and conditions to avoid blame if it is hacked again | LifeBank | Scoop.it

The Hong Kong-based company, which makes tablet devices aimed at children, had the personal details of five million customers and their children hacked through Vtech's app.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

This is priceless.  You can't fault them for taking an alternative route though - after all, I have been calling for companies to take an alternative route for some time... but who could have imagined what the alternative route would be???  The norm is to try to improve security whenever you get hacked.  I've been saying for some time now, do something different to that (because the higher you build the walls to stop people getting in, the higher the hackers build the ladders), and, indeed, I have been recommending, er, that organisations choose platforms like LifeBank to actually remove all of the private client data off the Cloud, thereby reassuring their customers that the primary #1 concern of Privacy has been address in a responsible manner, by putting individual's data back in the hands of the individual.  But Vtech, who have now been hacked for a second time (on record - and countless of times they won't admit to) are admitting that the security approach just ain't working, by instead changing their terms and conditions "so they don't get sued"!!!  As I said, "priceless."  That's their corporate social responsibility shot!  They might as well have said, "Privacy?  Ha!  Who cares?"  By the way, if you know anyone in Vtech, do forward them this commentary - it may not be too late for them to change their minds, take LifeBank, and save their shareholders' skins.  And for that matter, if you like the stuff that I write here, don't forget to share it too.  I thank you

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Digital Health Consumer Adoption: 2015 | Rock Health

Digital Health Consumer Adoption: 2015 | Rock Health | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Digital Health Consumer Adoption: 2015 | Rock Health | We're powering the future of healthcare. Rock Health is a seed and early-stage venture fund that supports startups building the next generation of technologies transforming healthcare.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

The most important finding from a large digital health survey in the US last year found the following.  “90%...consumers vehemently agree they should be in control of health data access.  This suggests that what is important to consumers is control and governance over their own data, not that they are unwilling to share."  Given that 9 out of 10 consumers' primary concern is Privacy, driven largely by the exponential rise in hacking, then there's only one answer... a platform like LifeBank, which incidentally also ships as HealthBank.  Guess what HealthBank is?  Yep... your own individual complete medical record, all offline, not on the web, nowhere near the Cloud.  And it is you, and you alone, that can determine and control to whom you wish to share that data with, say, in the medical world, with what permissions, and when.  It is you that controls how the record is updated - other research shows that this responsibility and self-management improves your health.  So, there you are LifeBank for the health market.

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The Research Pirates of the Dark Web

The Research Pirates of the Dark Web | LifeBank | Scoop.it
After getting shut down late last year, a website that allows free access to paywalled academic papers has sprung back up in a shadowy corner of the Internet.
Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

When one considers the dark web, the image one conjours up is the dark world of crime, perhaps brought to life by the villains in Batman - unidentifiable shadowy figures beyond the law.... in political vernacular: terrorists.  What we rather see in articles like this though is actually a more transparent view of the dark web: not terrorists, but freedom-fighters.  They say that standards stifle creativity, and therefore standards need to, what, obliterated?  The good thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from - clearly, there are too many to get rid of.  Similarly, patents stifle innovation, albeit we see different controls in jurisdictions around the world - for example, in the UK, patents are focussed primarily on technological inventions and not business process uniqueness, which means it's extremely hard to apply for a patent bent more towards the process rather than the technology.  Similarly, legislation itself stifles freedoms - whether you are in the US (where the constitution says something it illegal until it is made legal) or in the UK (where something is legal until it is made illegal) - society's political leaders lay down the rules for the next generation.  That's really hard.  Especially when you can't see what the next generation is going to be.  The laws that are made generally apply to previous problems.  As the internet takes us merrily into further unchartered territory, let us at least ponder the previous problems we have had, before we go marching on, because it is reasonable to predict that if privacy has not taken the mantle of #1 issue, then if the cause of the privacy issue is not resolved now, it can only but get worse as the progress of time advances.  The cause of privacy concerns is there seems to be no control around our private data on the internet, but because society works best as a self-regulating beast, rather than put in place further legislation, surely the answer is place data back in the hands of each private individual... with platforms like LifeBank.  Because the data will then be off-the-Cloud, this unfortunately could mean that LifeBank is misconstrued in transparent articles like this as the dark web - freedom fighters keeping their data away from prying corporations and snooping governments... the problem with that accusation is that LifeBank is not, by definition, on the web, dark or otherwise.  At best, it could be described as being used by a web of socially responsible individuals who are tired of having their privacy raped.  LifeBank will free us all up 

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Find Love for Data Privacy

Find Love for Data Privacy | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Online companies aren't giving away something for nothing.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

When Ashley Madison got hacked, regardless of any socially immoral crime of the punters, the real crime was the invasion of privacy of each and every individual who had signed up to the service.  Our private data is, er, private.  Just by agreeing to a service does not give consent for our privacy to be stripped from us.  Whether the Ashley Madison punters should be tried in a moral court may be one problem, but it's a different problem to the one of privacy.  The Ashley Madison hacking certainly was a memorable example that illustrates beautifully the privacy invasion issue, so we in the "Protect our Privacy" lobby are almost grateful for the free publicity... but that would be unfair to all those individuals whose privacy was unduly tampered with.  If you want to Find Love for Data Privacy, you need to start choosing corporations that demonstrate true corporate social responsibility in the way they manage data.... companies, for example, that use platforms like LifeBank are, sadly, few and far between, but they're growing, because they understand the most ethical approach to loving your data privacy is giving data back to the customer, for them to do with it what they wish to.  LifeBank means that the customer keeps their own data, offline.  That is all.

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Big data doesn’t come of age: 5 growing pains facing businesses today | Information Age

Big data doesn’t come of age: 5 growing pains facing businesses today | Information Age | LifeBank | Scoop.it

It may seem like big data is reaching a state of maturity, but the technology – and businesses that are impacted by it – will face significant challenges in 2016

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

Albert Einstein said, "We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them."  So, how do we solve the privacy and security problem?  Now, listen to Einstein - the answer is not to try to create more secure access (that's what we did when we created the internet)... good ol' Albert is telling us to think differently.  The major impact with the security issue that we face today is that our privacy is being compromised - I think in earlier 'scoops', I've referred to our data being raped and prostituted.  If we try to make it more secure, we'll end up with more of the same problem.  So, LifeBank has chosen to think differently about the problem, and has decided not to make your private data any more secure on the web - no, the answer is to take your data off the web.  Now, that's security, physical security, where no-one can hack it.  Simple...

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John McAfee: An email hack can destroy our digital world and we won't see it coming

John McAfee: An email hack can destroy our digital world and we won't see it coming | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Email holds the key to personal data. And with most accounts accessible on the Dark Web, are we safe?

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

Scary stuff, being robbed.  You just don't know who is looking through your front window right this minute.  Yep, your email is the front window of your life.  Just imagine someone right outside your front window right now, slowly opening it - regardless of whether you are home or not - silently entering without you noticing, as you go about your daily routines, then - BAM!!!  It's gone.  What has?  Well, for example, your credit card.  You may only notice it's gone when the bank calls to ask why you have racked up $5,000 purchases that day.  Then you think back.  You don't remember the intruder.  You didn't even see an open front window, because the intruder took care to close it again, although bugs were left in every room before departing. Feeling weird yet?  You should be.  Because that's what's happening every day.  Of sure, they're not interested in you and me - no, you can't shrug it off like that.  You're scared.  And rightly so.  So, do something about it.  Start to build a master-file of your life, off the Cloud, away from email - stop putting your information out there on the web, be that with location information on your smartphone, or posting everything about your life on FaceBook.  These email intruders use the information available to log in as you on FaceBook - they know where you live and they build a profile, only to use it to steal your identity.  Luckily, the next generation of privacy solutions are arriving in the form of platforms like LifeBank... if you are going to live in a house, make sure there's no front window!

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Big Data Ethics: 8 Key Facts To Ponder - InformationWeek

Big Data Ethics: 8 Key Facts To Ponder - InformationWeek | LifeBank | Scoop.it

There's a lot of gray area when it comes to the ethical collection, use, and analysis of data. Consider these 8 issues organizations should ponder when assessing their data use practices.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

"Be considerate - Build privacy, security, and respect for the customer into products."  Sums it up really.  But honestly now, who can name a single company that displays this sort of corporate social responsibility?  All organisations that I know are product centric - it's all about the money that is generated per product / service.  It's never about the customer - they will tell you it is, but it isn't.  What we see with the blatant display of disregard for our personal data is proof of this in itself.  If it was about the customer, guess what... privacy, security and respect for the customer would be build in - after all, we all know that research is quite clear this year that the primary concern for 9 out of 10 is, er, privacy.  And what are companies doing about it? Trying to build stronger security defences, that's what.  And the more they do that, the better the hackers get.  It's an endless cycle.  Surely, someone, in some organisation, is going to wake up soon - perhaps when they dream about it at 3 a.m. - with an epiphany moment: why not use a platform like LifeBank to give the customer back their privacy and their identity.  You mean, by taking all that private customer information OFF the web?  Good idea... it may even have legs

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The Four V's of Big Data

The Four V's of Big Data | LifeBank | Scoop.it

IBM data scientists break big data into four dimensions: volume, variety, velocity and veracity.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

No, no, no... there's not "Four V's of Big Data" - there's 5!  The one that's missing here is Victim.  That's you and me, the poor individuals whose data is raped and pillaged to such an extent our very identify and privacy is being compromised.  Actually, there's a 6th 'V' - the Vikings who are doing the raping and pillaging... pretty much every company that has signed up to the Cloud way of doing things, without so much of a consideration to the impact on their customers' lives.... Vikings can be replaced with Villains too, of course.  Now, if you want to replace Victim with 'Valued customer', that's easy - you put the primary concerns of the customer at the centre of your strategy, and the customers' #1 concern?  Privacy.  So, there you have it... the simple solution already exists in the form of platforms like LifeBank, which allow the customer to retain all their own data OFF-the-Cloud, and only link it to the Cloud when they wish to do so, giving consent to those they wish to, and what specific information they wish to share.

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How big data is changing business innovation | Information Age

How big data is changing business innovation | Information Age | LifeBank | Scoop.it

The way software-as-a-service companies use data to drive decisions has completely changed the innovation process of the technology sector

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

One of the major problems with software is that it comes out of the box as the developers envisaged you wanted it - leading to 80% functionality never being used.  So, what we see in the world of software development process improvement is that they now take the 'agile' approach - this means build the basics first, release it, and to a certain extent let the customers be lab guinea pigs, so that the next generation fixes problems, gets rid of things nobody uses, and builds new functionality... then do it all again, with 1 month cycles.  Whilst this works for some of the users some of the time, it certainly doesn't work for all of the users, all of the time.  That's where platforms like LifeBank come in.  LifeBank is the first ever platform that allows you to control your own data - so you decide which data is available to who, and when, completely off the Cloud.... BUT, and here's the thing, it also allows you to determine what data you want to collect and protect, as it's entirely a subjective platform, completely bespoke to every customer's own experience.  Now that's clever... LifeBank, the data company that doesn't own any data

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8 Cloud Computing Predictions For 2016 - InformationWeek

8 Cloud Computing Predictions For 2016 - InformationWeek | LifeBank | Scoop.it

While 2015 marked the moment when cloud became the go-to platform for enterprise applications and data, there's still plenty of maturing to go. Here's what we expect to see from cloud computing in 2016.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

They say, "every dog has its day."  Well, every problem has its day too.  Once an issue is solved, we all move on - educated, refreshed, and optimistic.  So, when we look at the major problems associated with the Cloud, it is refreshing to acknowledge that 'data security' stands out as the most major concern - however, the accepted assumption is that secure Cloud storage will be the answer, which explains why all the next gen storage companies have been enjoying heavy investment and accelerated growth in earnings per share recently.  This unfortunately will not actually address the data security concern that we all have as individuals that use the Cloud, because that's the very reason why we have these concerns in the first place: we use the Cloud AND we have found it to be insecure.  History teaches us well - whenever you try to make an uncrackable code, someone cracks it; every time.  Therefore, trying to make the Cloud more secure is just not going to work - someone will crack and hack it; every time.  The answer is "hybrid", yes - but from a data security perspective - and that's where platforms like LifeBank come in... they allow you to keep your own personal data off-the-Cloud, whilst at the same time giving you the freedom and flexibility to consent to your data being available when, wherever, and whoever you decide.

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Big data trends: The top eight analytics lessons for business

Big data trends: The top eight analytics lessons for business | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Big data and analytics technology is driving business forward, the newest natural resource in the ever-changing world of computing.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

How BIG to do we want big data to get?  Are there any bounds?  And what are the consequences?  My adage: for every benefit, there's an equal & opposite dis-benefit.  The basic business laws of supply and demand prove this - you ask me for an ice-cream; I give you one (this is a benefit to us both); I continue this all day until I run out; then all the rest of the salivating members of the public in the long queue on the beach all miss out (this is a dis-benefit to me, the ice-cream seller, and the disappointed customers - all because the other previous customers BENEFITTED from my success of selling ice-cream).  We have seen this recently yet again.  "Here, have self-service," IBM said, when they launched e-business 20 years ago (I should know, I was an e-business ambassador) - and we did... we lapped it up, bucket-loads of it, which morphed into another group of terms, like 'the cloud'.  In doing so, we generated ridiculous amounts of data.  But sadly, we did not think of the consequences.  We did not think of the dis-benefits that all this benefit was bringing.  Well, we are now.  We now suddenly realise that our privacy has not just been compromised, but fundamentally taken away from us.  It is hurting, real bad.  The ambulance has arrived though - in the form of platforms like LifeBank, which allow you to be in control of your own data, off the web / the cloud / the internet of things (whatever you wish to call the overall service), and you decide who, when and where you consent to your information being accessed.  The good news is that the approach can be a hybrid one - that is to say that you physically can carry around your data, but because you are in control of what non-private data you give back to the networked world, they businesses that trade in data will still be able to do all their big data analytics... this time the benefit to you means there's a dis-benefit to the world of data analytics: shame!

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12 Ways To Connect Data Analytics To Business Outcomes - InformationWeek

12 Ways To Connect Data Analytics To Business Outcomes - InformationWeek | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Even though more organizations are attempting to become data-driven, many of them still aren't able to link data analytics to business outcomes. Some of the challenges are obvious. Others aren't. Here are our tips for avoiding the common pitfalls.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

Call me old-fashioned, but I'm not sure that the issue here is how to manage data, and whether there are too many C-levels muscling in on the action - for example, trying to decide in whose department or division to house the data team.  No, the issue is much more fundamental - we seem to have lost the face-to-face connection with our customers (because we've given them no choice except to have self-service, so that we can cut costs, then try to use the data associated with those self-service transactions to get insights about what to do next with our customers).  At the same time of losing the physical connection, we have also ended up making our customers extremely suspicious of us, because we flaunt their private data around, which means they are less likely to want to reconnect in the future.  Let us now ask where we should house the data team, but instead ask where we should house the data!  Using a platform like LifeBank to put the data back in the hands of the customer addresses their number one concern: data privacy.  Doing this one thing alone will ensure you stand head and shoulders above your crowded competitive marketplace.  Your customers will come flocking back to you.  You will be able to reconnect, physically - and that means that a real person (who works for your company), not some computer, will be able to develop the relationship with your customer.  Relationships equate to longevity, more business, referrals... you know, all that old fashioned business stuff they used to teach on MBA courses

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Why 2016 will be the year of the global data culture shift | Information Age

Why 2016 will be the year of the global data culture shift | Information Age | LifeBank | Scoop.it

2016 could be the year that data is weaved into the fabric of organisational culture, with buy-in from all levels

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

Rise of the CDO (Chief Data Officer) research talks in terms of "the appointment of the new data guardian."  Again, all these articles that I scoop daily seem to be missing the point.  The only data guardian should be the customer themselves, and - at risk of repeating myself - surely the answer should be to appoint a CCO (Chief Customer Officer) to put the focus on the customer from with the organisation, thereby the a plan to help the customer how to be the guardian of their own data.  For more information, call LifeBank - or find another platform like it.  We really are here to help.

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4 Data Security Tips For CIOs - InformationWeek

4 Data Security Tips For CIOs - InformationWeek | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Security challenges facing CIOs will continue to escalate because the payoffs are high for perpetrators, and risks are relatively low. Here are four tips to help your organization - and your data - into less appealing targets for the bad guys.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

It's not rocket-science is it?  But it might as well be!!  Good grief - reasons why hackers are attracted to servers with lots of personal data?  Hmmm, let me think.  I know: "payoffs are high... and risks are relatively low."  Thanks, Sherlock.  Sometimes a little sarcasm is just what's needed to help bring a wry smile to the tired face of the reader - I know, I know, you've been working all day... who knows, perhaps the sarcasm might even help you remember our core message: "I must call LifeBank."  I'm being slightly unfair on the article - there's actually one good tip in it, to appoint a Data Protection Officer.  Once you've done that though, make sure you give him the message, "call LifeBank."  That's both your strategy and plan.  Platforms like LifeBank (and, er, in fairness, I haven't come across any others) are the perfect way to deal with your hacking problems... just remove all the important data that hackers are interested in from the Cloud, the internal network, the web, the whatever-you-call-it, and put it safely offline where no hacker can reach it.  Elementary, Dr Watson...

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10% of the data holds 90% of the value: four reasons why

10% of the data holds 90% of the value: four reasons why | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Via Lorien Pratt
Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

1% of the world's data is compatible with another 1% of the rest of the 99% available data.  This is due to the abundance of data standards, and importantly the accessibility of that data.  For example, there are many proprietary systems, build as proprietary systems so that they would have competitive value.  We see this in the way that institutions have developed or bought software over the past 50 years from banks to governments to telcos, to retailers to mines to manufacturers, er, etc.  Then the systems were upgraded, often without linkage to old legacy data.  Then someone made an attempt to make one system 'interoperate' with another system, creating a whole new data set, with a new data schema, data library, data definitions, etc - all of the, of course, complete incompatible with any other system of it's kind.  Standards like ODBC appeared, which helped 1%, so thanks for that.  The point is that data these days includes multimedia data like video and voice, not to mention all sorts of sensor data... less than 1%  of it compatible with anything else.  So, the big data industry is growing and that means loads of money being thrown at it.  Reality check - be careful what you expect.  On the other hand, we could give everybody their own data, on an open standard, for example, on a platform like LifeBank and make it really easy for LifeBank to interoperate with any other system... I say "we could", but I should've said, "we already are."  Enough said

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Lorien Pratt's curator insight, October 22, 2015 10:28 PM

There's a tremendous amount of resource waste in "gratuitous data management": of fields and tables that matter less than others.  All data is not created equal when it comes to solving business problems.

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How to manage your data before it manages you | Information Age

How to manage your data before it manages you | Information Age | LifeBank | Scoop.it

IT administrators today have a lot to take into consideration when it comes to selecting strategic data plans for their businesses

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

The ultimate in hybrid data management is, yes, the Cloud together with a private network... but what if the private network was actually just one single node, one device - an information exchange of, er, one?  And what if that exchange was offline?  Now that's truly hybrid - both online and offline.  That's LifeBank.  There really isn't any other platform like it.  It's offline.  That's your data we're talking about.  Nobody can hack it whilst it's offline.  And when you want to share it - well, you can.  With whomever you wish to share it.  And however much of it you wish to share.  LifeBank.  Think differently.

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90% of large organisations will have a chief data officer by 2019 – Gartner | Information Age

90% of large organisations will have a chief data officer by 2019 – Gartner | Information Age | LifeBank | Scoop.it

1,000 chief data officers or chief analytics officers forecast in large organisations by the end of 2015, up from 400 in 2014

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

It's not a Chief Data Officer that businesses need, it's a Chief Customer Officer... the person who listens most closely to the voice of the customer.  The more we focus on data, the less we focus on the customer.  The result?  Ignoring customers' #1 concerns.  And the top concern at the moment?  Data!  So, why have a Chief Data Officer?  The answer: don't!  Governments should legislate that all companies appoint Chief Customer Officers - and then those CCOs should all buy platforms like LifeBank, and immediately satisfy the biggest current customer concern

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Big Data Goes Mainstream: What Now? - InformationWeek

Big Data Goes Mainstream: What Now? - InformationWeek | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Now that big data initiatives are going mainstream in Fortune 1000 companies, CIOs and other C-level executives are targeting the next frontier -- how to transform all that information into products and services -- according to a new report.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

First it was Software_as_a_Service (SaaS).  Now we have Infrastructure_as_a_Service - IaaS, no doubt.  Well, how about Privacy_as_a_Service (PaaS)?  It's actually already arrived, in case you didn't know, in the form of platforms like LifeBank.  LifeBank allows you to withdraw your private data and information from the internet, the Cloud, the web... and then it puts control of that data in your very own hands, offline.  This means that it is YOU and only you that consents to who has access to that data, how much of that data is available, and for how long that data is accessible.  Privacy is our #1 concern, and PaaS is the answer we've all been waiting for...

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Digital Legacy Websites : digital legacy

Digital Legacy Websites : digital legacy | LifeBank | Scoop.it

digital legacy - Omline is a website, developed by Spanish startup company Omneo Group, that is designed to make it easier than ever for you to compile, curate and ...

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

We capture our life story in so many ways these days... LinkedIn tells the story of our career (and means you can't be so creative with each CV anymore); FaceBook tells the day-to-day story about your interests, moments captured by location, captions, and photos, as well as your network of friends and relatives; whilst Google mail tells the story of your correspondence.  All of these stories are held in someone else's computers, and all that data is analysed beyond comprehension, essentially to prostitute you and make money.  So, do we really need another online way to capture "your life story" just so that you can put a nice memorial together, a memorial that yet again sits on someone else's server, on the Cloud.  No.  However, what we do need is the same principle, but offline... enter stage left: LifeBank - the clue is in the name.  A repository where you collect and 'bank', er, your 'life', from memories to family trees to your funeral wishes and your powers of attorney... actually, everything that you can't even think of, it's that exhaustive.  And because it's OFF the Cloud, it's not hackable.  Nice

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New anti-terror laws are 'rushed and a threat to our privacy'

New anti-terror laws are 'rushed and a threat to our privacy' | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Parliamentary committee warned the new laws give only 'piecemeal' protection from excessive surveillance by intelligence agencies, as terror attacks are being used to ride over privacy.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

When an intruder hacks into a server on the Cloud, it's a criminal offence, even before the hacker takes the data and steals your identity and compromises your privacy.  Governments are not allowed to do this.  Yet.  The idea of the new anti-terror laws are precisely to put legitimacy at the heart of the activity of intruding into whatever server on the Cloud (including your home computer) that the government so chooses to intrude into.  The outcome, from the citizen's perspective, is that our privacy is compromised in both scenarios.  One wonders whether the legislation will take into account 'whether the law will apply to the IT in your arsenal that you have outside of the UK.  How does the UK government justify monitoring servers outside of the UK?   It seems yet again that the only way to really secure your privacy is using off-line platforms like LifeBank... as we certainly can't trust our governments to protect our privacy 

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How mighty is the EU-US Privacy Shield?

How mighty is the EU-US Privacy Shield? | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Mason Hayes & Curran looks at the EU-US Privacy Shield and what this framework for data transfer actually means.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

Refreshingly, it is good to see some extensive thought from professionals from within our wider communities reviewing global agreements that transcend our basic daily lives and the tiny ecosystems that we live in.  Everything is connected.  Everything.  Connected.  Think about that.  The 'butterfly effect' suggests that a very small event on one side of the globe can have exponential consequences on the other side.  Therefore, it is massively important to think through consequences, impacts and potential scenarios - not doing so lends itself to disaster.  What we need with the EU-US Privacy Shield - when considering consequences - is not just something that deals with the legacy issues we already created for ourselves by not previously thinking through the consequences, but we need policies that draw up thinking on a new way of doing things, where, from the outset, the individual's privacy is protected.  That's why platforms like LifeBank now exist, and these platforms have to leverage lobbying to ensure political leaders are putting in place legislation to force companies to change the direction of travel - for example, stop trying to join up health networks across public and private ecosystems... they've never worked and they're never going to work.  However, having everyone carrying their own personal LifeBank - a data exchange of only one person (to as many as is required) - now, that's progress

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Teen Who Hacked CIA Director’s Email Tells How He Did It

Teen Who Hacked CIA Director’s Email Tells How He Did It | LifeBank | Scoop.it

The hacker who allegedly broke into CIA Director John Brennan's private AOL email account tells WIRED how he did it.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

It is a perfectly normal human condition that we all do: my employer restricts access to work-related stuff from outside the office, so when I need to work from home (because society, not unsupported by my employer, sends me on a guilt trip if I'm not working 24 hours a day), I just email it to myself at my home email account; simple.  Now, of course, there are two sources of the data that can be hacked online.  It's something we've all been doing for years, and a consequence we just don't think about.  Good news, though - platforms like LifeBank are not just there for your personal data, as business versions (like BusinessBank) exist for businesses to give their employees ways of keeping important data, accessible, yet securely away from the Cloud (or internal servers that might be subject to internal fraudulent access).  And the cost?  Much less that trying to keep ahead of the hackers with the 'latest security' patches...

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Three Crucial Questions Every CMO Should Ask Before Starting a Big Data Project

Three Crucial Questions Every CMO Should Ask Before Starting a Big Data Project | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Marketing Strategy - The following questions can help CMOs outline a course of action and prove the ROI of a Big Data project for marketing.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

Whereas the two words that seem to count most in boardroom discussions around 2016 trends are "Big Data", actually the two words that boardrooms should instead be focussing on are those of most concern in their clients' mind: "privacy" and "security".  Continuing to focus on Big Data and continuing to fail to focus on privacy and security will mean that clients and customers will become increasingly frustrated until we get to the straw that breaks the camel's back - at which point, there is a tremendous risk that the damage will be irreparable.  Even the way we write "Big Data" versus "privacy" and "security" is telling - capital B and D in Big Data just shows how important it is to the company, but small 'p' and 's' reflect how unimportant they are to the company... but actually, to us individuals out there, our screams of PRIVACY and SECURITY just don't seem to be heard.  What to do; what to do.  Individuals could take matters into their own hands with platforms like LifeBank.  Alternatively, businesses who might wish to differentiate themselves could instead steal a march or two ahead of their competitors by proactively providing LifeBank to their clients, thereby gaining important mindshare as well as marketshare.  That is actually what CMOs should be doing at the moment - and NOT doing 'me too', focussing on Big Data.  Ideally, the winning CMO will recognise that you need to do both

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Artificial Intelligence Is Now Telling Doctors How to Treat You

Artificial Intelligence Is Now Telling Doctors How to Treat You | LifeBank | Scoop.it

Artificial intelligence is still in the very early stages of development–in so many ways, it can’t match our own intelligence–and computers certainly can’t replace doctors at the bedside.

Sandy Gilchrist's insight:

There are a number of ways of skinning a cat when it comes to cat-scanning ('computerised tomography' that digitises X-ray images to display them on a screen).  The question is, "what do you want done with your cat scan data," or more precisely, "who do you want to consent to having access to that data, with what restrictions?"  That's where platforms like LifeBank come in.  We know the benefits of data like this being widely available for research purposes - for example, spotting trends and coming up with cures, which could benefit me and everyone else.  So, what LifeBank does is it allows you to be in control of who you share your data with.  Your data sits on your LifeBank, which is a (secure) device that goes in your pocket.  It's an information exchange of one: YOU are that one.  You decide when, where and who you share that information with.  You also decide under what constraints - for example, you can anonymise the data, so it can be used for research, without your privacy being compromised.  You can agree for the data to also be stored in an unconnected computer within a surgery, clinic, or hospital.  But ultimately, you hold your own master file.  This means that the public and private health ecosystems that will never be able to have joined-up, interoperable systems no longer have to worry about having a network access to data when they need to treat you and are trying to find your medical records - instead, when they are treating you, they have immediate access to your records, which means you might just have a better chance of survival.  It also means if any of the global hacking community get unauthorised access to the database within the health provider (er, like 80 million clients of Anthem last year), and steal your identity, or change your records (like "up the dosage" on your prescriptions, just for fun), the you have your own master file that you yourself can rely on, knowing that it cannot be hacked.  Simple, isn't it...

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