Be Rude
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Be Rude
Stuff in the music industry that I find to be relevant, amusing, or just interesting.
Curated by Brianna Rud
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Digital Music News - Shazam Now Generates 1 Out of Every 14 Paid Downloads...

Digital Music News - Shazam Now Generates 1 Out of Every 14 Paid Downloads... | Be Rude | Scoop.it
Brianna Rud's insight:

Recent research of digital music downloads has shown that now 1 in 14 paid music downloads are generated by the Shazam application, which is an app that listens to any outside music playing, identifies the song, and offers links for the user to download the song. This application is generating over $300 million dollars a year and this seems to only be increasing. While I find the growth of Shazam interesting, it is not at all surprising. Technology in this industry is constantly advancing and I think that it is only a matter of time until devices are able to track all music that is being played anywhere at anytime. The great fear in the industry right now is the threat of piracy and how it is going to eliminate the incentive to ever pay for music. However, I think that this article shows that, if nothing else, people are paying for music. They are just doing so through less traditional methods. We’ve discuss in class the possibility of technology in the not-so-distant future that would be able to track music being played in restaurants, amusement parks, and other public places. That way, each song would have to be paid for each time that it is played. It is an intriguing concept, as I wonder how much money the industry could actually generate from this technology. I was reading another article today that said that studies have shown that most online streaming site users are inactive, which would indicate that the modes of music consumption are still changing. Shazam is a very unique app as it allows the user to immediate discover the name of the track they are hearing and enables the user to buy the song right there. It is obvious that we, as a society, are becoming increasingly more impatience with our consumption of music. We want it and we want it now. Maybe this is our next “Napster moment”.

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Digital Music News - Chevrolet: "We Are No Longer Affiliated with Grooveshark In Any Manner"

Digital Music News - Chevrolet: "We Are No Longer Affiliated with Grooveshark In Any Manner" | Be Rude | Scoop.it
Brianna Rud's insight:

One of the most controversial online streaming sites today, Grooveshark has been taking some heat from UMG, Google, and Apple for quite some time. Lawsuits have been filed claiming that the music-streaming site does not adequately pay the musicians for the music that it has available on its site. Apple products do not have the Grooveshark app available for download from their Apps Store. Google soon followed Apple with a ban of Grooveshark from its application store. However, despite the friction between Grooveshark and the media-giants, Apple and Google, the site has still managed to do considerably well. In mid-March 2013, a new advertising campaign was released for Grooveshark’s HTML5 mobile solution, sponsored by Chevrolet. If this had been the end of the article, I would be inclined to, again, mention how the rest of the business world seems to notice that there is a huge opportunity in the sponsorship of online streaming databases. However, the story does not end there. A few days ago, Chevy announces that they were cutting ties with Grooveshark and that they are “no longer affiliated with Grooveshark in any manner”. I was very intrigued as to what caused this turn around for Chevrolet. When they took the initial campaign, there is no way that Chevy did not know that it was going against the powerhouses of Google and Apple. Did they really just decide that supporting Grooveshark was too much “bad” publicity? It’s possible, however, I would suspect that there is more behind the story. Google and Apple have their hands in many markets, many of which, I’m sure, involve pairing themselves with automobile companies. Since both Apple and Google have very publically shunned Grooveshark, Chevy put a large target on its back by supporting a site that, in a matter of speaking, has been blacklisted. I’m not sure how I feel about Grooveshark’s business dealings and finances, however, it is a little daunting to see the powerful impact that Google and Apple can have within numerous industries.

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For Music Industry, a Story of Two Googles

For Music Industry, a Story of Two Googles | Be Rude | Scoop.it
When it comes to the music industry, there are two Googles — represented on one side by its suite of entertainment media services, and on the other by its mighty search engine.
Brianna Rud's insight:

I thought that this article was very interesting. The R.I.A.A. is upset with Google because so many illegal download sites rank higher in Google’s search engine than legitimate sites. They believe that the problem is Google’s inability to “crack down” on pirate sites. Google claims that they are working very hard to eliminate reported pirate pages from their search engine and have made significant progress. Whether that is true, I don’t know. However, I think that this article is another prime example of how the music industry likes to whine about all the things that everyone else is doing wrong, instead of just approaching the issue as an opportunity for innovation and creativity. I think that if the music industry was really that concerned about its rankings on Google, it would invest in sponsored links for its sites (which Google always ranks first). But it hasn’t done that. Shocking… Only not really.  It seems that the industry is looking for the cheapest way out, and one that requires minimal amounts of critical thinking.

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Digital Music News - Congratulations: The Music Industry Is Now 'Napster-Proof'...

Digital Music News - Congratulations: The Music Industry Is Now 'Napster-Proof'... | Be Rude | Scoop.it
Brianna Rud's insight:

Napster was an evolutionary development in the music industry. It tossed the old model aside and opened up the doors to a new concept where any music was available at anytime. Although the initial site was shut down and then relaunched as a legal site, many music streaming sites have developed their business models to copy Napster’s design (like Spotify, Pandora, and YouTube, to name a few). This article first asks the question: what will be the next “Napster” moment, where the old model is dismantled and everyone needs to start over? The author’s opinion is that there won’t be another “Napster” moment. The reasoning behind this is that anyone can get music for free today and, in many ways, do so legally. Consumers don’t even have the same desire to steal music as they once did, because they don’t have to. They can just go to any of the streaming sites previously listed. While the music industry believes that putting an end to music pirating will save them, they don’t quite understand the issue at hand. They are not really competing with torrent sites, but rather with legal sites that have been able to create a business model that provide the consumers with what they want, but still generates a profit for the company. While I think that this article has a lot of interesting points and insight about the industry, I’m not sure that I exactly agree that there will never be another “Napster” moment. The reality is, Napster is not the first “Napster moment” that the industry has seen. It happened before with the radio. Everyone was sure it was the end of the music industry because who would want to buy music when they could listen to the radio for free? Yet, the industry did not collapse. In fact, it surged forward. These “Napster moments” are always unexpected, so I think it is a little arrogant of the author to assume that we have seen the last of them, simply because we can’t imagine what a possible moment might be. I believe that this industry is constantly changing and will always have a need for creativity and innovation. We can never get too comfortable to the current model or the next “Napster moment” will take us by surprise.

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Digital Music News - The RIAA Has Now Forced Google to Remove 10,000,000 Links...

Digital Music News - The RIAA Has Now Forced Google to Remove 10,000,000 Links... | Be Rude | Scoop.it
Brianna Rud's insight:

Further elaborating on the “Tale of Two Googles”, the story continues with an article that states that the RIAA has now forced Google to remove 10 million piracy URLs. By law, Google is not required to take down a site unless is has received proper takedown notices. Since this process has not been as effective as the RIAA would like, they are overloading Google with millions of these notices. This would seem like extreme action on the RIAA’s part, however, it reveals how strongly the organization feels about pirate sites being so readily accessible to the public. The article also mentions the popular music-streaming site, Grooveshark. While this action may not doing any serious harm to Google (other than the tedious task of taking down all the sites) it can be effective in shutting the smaller sites down. Grooveshark has already collected numerous legal bills and infringements. While I do not really care to speculate on the future of Grooveshark, search generators like Google have been using “loopholes” to refresh the guilty sites, which suggests that this notice overload is not going to result in much change. I still feel that the RIAA and the music industry in its entirety are taking the wrong approach with dealing with pirate sites. Companies are paying big money to have their ads placed on these illegal download sites and even Google sees the payoff in refreshing the content. The industry could take on that old mentality of, “if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em”. The music industry does not exist as some stagnant being that is not constantly changing and evolving. Like the society that surrounds us, everything is becoming more technology advance and requires constant creativity and innovation. For an industry that is supposed to be made up of innovative “creatives”, it is coming off as lazy and dull. No, I do not think that people should be illegally downloading music, but they are not going to stop just because the RIAA goes on a pirate-site-killing-rampage.

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Digital Music News - A List of the Biggest Brands Supporting Piracy Online, as Published by USC Annenberg...

Digital Music News - A List of the Biggest Brands Supporting Piracy Online, as Published by USC Annenberg... | Be Rude | Scoop.it
Brianna Rud's insight:

One of the big issues in the music industry is the topic of piracy and how it is going to be the "downfall" of the industry. Although it is illegal, this article reveals that there are numerous big-name companies that are placing their advertisements on piracy websites. I am not going to sit here and encourage pirating music or suggest that piracy is not a crime. However, I can't entirely fault the actions of these companies. I believe that the increase of music pirating is a result of the industry being unable to adapt and innovate in an ever-changing market. While this article may be unsettling to individuals in the music industry, I feel that it should be an indication to them of where the money can be made. These companies are paying to have their advertisements on the pirate sites, so it is obvious that there is money to be made. If the industry were to develop its own legal free online streaming and downloading sites, pirate sites would become obsolete, advertising companies would bring their business there, and the industry would be able to profit. We’ve talked in several classes about how people are not unwilling to pay for a product or service; they just don’t like being forced to. If people are given the option, such as paying customers get bonus services available to them, they are more likely to pay. I found it interesting that of all the brand-name companies listed in this article, Levi is the only one to have ceased its advertisements on pirate sites. It is obvious that these companies view the benefit of supporting the illegal sites to be worth the bad publicity that comes with it, which, I think, really says something. Piracy is not the downfall. However, the inability to adapt could be.

 

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