BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2
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BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2
This is Scoop.it! 1 with articles and news about topics in Chapter 2.
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Suggested by Tim Taylor
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Understanding Nonverbal Communication in the Workplace

Understanding Nonverbal Communication in the Workplace | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
What people actually say in the workplace is important but HOW they say it and how they communicate in a nonverbal way is important too.
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Suggested by Tim Beedle
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Let’s End the Hugging Arms Race | TIME.com

Let’s End the Hugging Arms Race | TIME.com | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
I am not a hugger. And I am not alone.
Andrea Stone's insight:

Is hugging ever appropriate in a business context?

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Angelina Duwel's comment, January 26, 2014 11:46 PM
Hugging is not appropriate for the office. You should only hug someone if they are a close friend or family member. It is awkward to give hugs, even half hugs, to people that you do not have a personal connection with. Even if you work with a close friend, you should not hug in the office. The work place should be professional, and I do not believe hugging is professional.
Tim Beedle's comment, January 26, 2014 11:50 PM
I don't believe hugging is appropriate either but I found the scenario mentioned in the article interesting about the two people who just heard great news regarding their project and the man's automatic reaction was to hug the other person. It then became very awkward for him around the office following that interaction.
April Williams's comment, January 29, 2014 8:20 PM
I agree hugging is never appropriate in the work place unless you work with your spouse or best friend.
Suggested by Seth Hastings
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Professionalism in the Workplace - JWilliams Staffing

Professionalism in the Workplace - JWilliams Staffing | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Professionalism in the workplace is based on many factors, including how you dress, carry yourself, your attitude and how you interact with others.
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Suggested by Brittney Hatampa
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Effective Business Communication in Meetings

Effective Business Communication in Meetings | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Effective business communication is essential during meetings, since meetings offer the opportunity for employees from different facets of the company to gather together to reinforce strategies, ...
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Suggested by Connor Kurtz
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Improving Group Dynamics: Helping Your Team Work More Effectively

Improving Group Dynamics: Helping Your Team Work More Effectively | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Learn how to help your people work together more effectively.
Andrea Stone's insight:

This is a great summary of small group theory. This is one of those "easier said than done" situations. It is easy to lay out how groups can get along better, but it can be so hard in real life. 

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Suggested by Angelina Duwel
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How To Participate in Online Meetings - Top Etiquette Tips for Participating in Meetings Online

How To Participate in Online Meetings - Top Etiquette Tips for Participating in Meetings Online | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Learn more about online meeting etiquette and the do's and don'ts of web meeting participation.
Andrea Stone's insight:

This article has lots of very practical advice for online meetings. 

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Tim Taylor's comment, January 26, 2014 1:08 PM
Great information, I wish i would have had this when I started. Most my clients are on the coast so never see them in person. I have encountered countless don'ts on this list.
Suggested by Kramer Newsom
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The Four Keys To Success With Virtual Teams

The Four Keys To Success With Virtual Teams | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
When your team is all over the world instead of in one building, different rules apply.
Andrea Stone's insight:

I was just talking to my boss about hiring people and working virtually. I think it is a great trend. How would you all feel about working remotely?

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Shannon Henderson's comment, January 26, 2014 2:18 PM
I think it's a great idea. With how our society has changed so much it's only practical to keep up with the change. Most everything is done via the web, and unless you are having personal interaction with customers, it can work with motivated and disciplined employees.
Samantha Thomas's comment, January 26, 2014 9:10 PM
Hiring remote workers and working virtually is something I think every company should consider. As someone who deals better with online learning, having a career via the web is something I definitely wish was more of an opportunity.
Suggested by Brady Conine
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The Rules of Professionalism: Getting Millennial Workers Onboard

The Rules of Professionalism: Getting Millennial Workers Onboard | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Should professionalism be defined by wearing specific attire and being at work at a designated time? One thought leader says human resources should focus more on communicating the results expected and allowing flexibility in achieving those results.
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Tim Taylor's comment, January 26, 2014 1:07 PM
It is always interesting talking to students who think they will get out of school and make the $60,000+ they were promised by their adviser. It takes hard work and a long time to build a real career and make that money. I am a Millennial who is still working on it but my whole life I was taught there is a ladder to climb and its very tall.
Suggested by Traci Bartgis
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What Do U.S. College Graduates Lack? Professionalism

What Do U.S. College Graduates Lack? Professionalism | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
I gave an exam last week, and one student showed up 25 minutes late. When the hour ended and I collected the papers, he looked up from his seat, cast a pitiable glance and mumbled, “Please, I got here late -- may I have another 20 minutes?
Andrea Stone's insight:

Wow! This article is tough on new college graduates. Do you think it is accurate and fair? 

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Katie Daugherty's comment, January 24, 2014 2:23 PM
This article could serve as a harsh wake up call to new graduates. I don't think it's fair to place blame completely on the student because work ethics are learned from a variety of places; parents, teachers, other students, and mentors all had an impact on my work ethic I have today. Those are learned very early on and don't change easily. As a senior, I can see where a sense of entitlement comes from. I'm constantly hearing about older friends of mine that are already graduated and making large sums of money right out college. What makes them so great? How do I get a job like that? These things aren't the same for everyone so it's hard to know what you're actually deserving of.
Meredith Nichole's comment, January 24, 2014 9:23 PM
I really enjoyed this article. It is something I feared that may happen to me when I enter the workforce. However, I think it is important to help new graduates understand so they do not make these mistakes other than harshly criticizing them.
Traci Bartgis's comment, January 26, 2014 10:56 PM
I do not think this article is completely accurate, and certainly not fair but life isn't fair. I do understand why the stigma of new college graduates is portrayed the way it is in this article, but if you are a professional your work ethic should speak for itself in time and earn respect. The job market is not easy for any age these days, and these perceptions of new grads certainly does not help in our favor.
Suggested by Lindsay McCann
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Running an Effective Teleconference or Virtual Meeting

Running an Effective Teleconference or Virtual Meeting | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Virtual teams are becoming commonplace, but the old rules for running a meeting don't necessarily apply. Managers need to learn new skills to keep people engaged and to use the time (and technology) effectively.
Andrea Stone's insight:

Virtual meetings are becoming much more common. Knowing how to participate and host them is a great skill to bring to a workplace. 

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Traci Bartgis's comment, January 25, 2014 3:23 PM
I think virtual meetings are a great asset to the corporate world. It provides more oppurtunities when it comes to working from home and traveling to keep everyone on the same field.
Suggested by Skylar Horn
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Why Is Listening Important in a Business Organisation?

Why Is Listening Important in a Business Organisation? | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Verbal communication involves both speaking and listening. In a business organization, listening is key to effective working relationships among employees and between management and staff. Listening ...
Andrea Stone's insight:

People usually think you are really smart if you just listen. I got a job once because I let the interviewer talk and talk about themselves! Good tips here. 

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Samantha Thomas's comment, January 26, 2014 9:24 PM
I've always felt like the best way to get on an interviewer's good side is to let them do all the talking, and occasionally make them laugh! This article does a good job of breaking down the important reasons for listening in a professional setting, and not just why listening is important in general.
Suggested by Shannon Henderson
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10 Etiquette Rules For Meetings That Every Professional Should Know

10 Etiquette Rules For Meetings That Every Professional Should Know | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
We spoke to career coach Barbara Pachter for the 10 etiquette rules you need to know when attending a meeting or conference.
Andrea Stone's insight:

These are good tips. I would also recommend paying close attention to the culture of your organization. For example, I work at a natural gas company and meet with people who are responsible if a pipeline ruptures or we have an accident. They will always have their phones out, and it is okay!

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Shannon Henderson's comment, January 26, 2014 2:13 PM
I agree with you, Amanda. I never even thought about something like that until I read this article. One person should not stand out over another simply because of something as small as chairs not being level.
Shannon Henderson's comment, January 26, 2014 2:15 PM
Thanks for sharing that, Skylar! I like the one about not pulling out someone's chair regardless of gender. In a business setting everyone needs to be on a level playing field regardless of gender.
Skylar Horn's comment, January 26, 2014 8:23 PM
I couldn't agree with you more, Shannon. I am glad you found the article interesting.
Suggested by Joe Sannicolas
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Importance of Business Etiquette

Importance of Business Etiquette | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Etiquette is a set of unwritten rules that apply to social situations, professional workplaces and relationships. In the business world, good business etiquette means that you act professionally and ...
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Suggested by April Williams
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Why is teamwork important? | 8 good reasons why teamwork is so important!

Why is teamwork important? | 8 good reasons why teamwork is so important! | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Why is teamwork important? Well it's one thing to create a team, but quite another to create teamwork. To put it simply, teams don't work without teamwork.
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Erin Chism's comment, January 28, 2014 11:39 AM
I think that a lot of people do not realize just how important teamwork is. I have been a server all through high school and college. I notice all the time just how much more smoothly things go if everyone works together and helps each other out instead of only thinking about yourself. Customers notice too.
April Williams's comment, January 29, 2014 8:19 PM
I agree Erin, I work in the healthcare field and teamwork is important in the workplace. Without it people become unhappy and less gets done.
Suggested by Natasha Earle
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Four Principles For Planning Brain-Friendly Annual Meetings

Four Principles For Planning Brain-Friendly Annual Meetings | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Andrea Stone's insight:

This article is really interesting and useful beyond just annual meetings. Think about it for presentations you must give too. 

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Suggested by Erin Chism
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Sharing Leadership to Maximize Talent

Sharing Leadership to Maximize Talent | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
With global expansion, intra- and inter-industry restructuring, and increasing numbers of merging organizations, the need for dynamic flexibility and a broad base of knowledge and expertise is grea...
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Suggested by Brady Conine
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Effective Nonverbal Communication in Business: Posture and Space

Effective Nonverbal Communication in Business: Posture and Space | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
This article discusses the important of posture and physical space when engaging in face-to-face conversations.
Andrea Stone's insight:

Do you cross your arms or legs in meetings? This article talks about the message that sends. (Hint: Try not to do it!)

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Connor Kurtz's comment, January 26, 2014 7:28 PM
I took a class freshmen or sophomore year about communications. In the class I learned that 67 percent of you communicate in through body language. I also believe body language is a key factor in communicating.
Suggested by Philip Jackson
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The Rules of Professionalism: Getting Millennial Workers Onboard

The Rules of Professionalism: Getting Millennial Workers Onboard | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Should professionalism be defined by wearing specific attire and being at work at a designated time? One thought leader says human resources should focus more on communicating the results expected and allowing flexibility in achieving those results.
Andrea Stone's insight:

Do you agree with this assessment of Milennials and what they want in the workplace? I think many people want to be managed the way the article describes and not just Milennials! 

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Connor Kurtz's comment, January 28, 2014 6:59 PM
I have two views of professionalism. 1) I agree in the old school way that people should act and be in line in the business enviroment. attire, manners, etc. 2) I also feel that its important for people to be themselves no matter where they are. it would be hard to get work done when trying to be someone you're not. like it says in the article, outcome is more important that anything.
Suggested by Alexis Wiedemann
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5 Keys of Dealing with Workplace Conflict

5 Keys of Dealing with Workplace Conflict | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
image credit: DN Nation Here’s the thing - leadership and conflict go hand-in-hand. Leadership is a full-contact sport, and if you cannot or will not address conflict in a healthy, productive fashion, you should not be in a leadership role.
Andrea Stone's insight:

What do you think about conflict? Should it be avoided? Encouraged?

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Brittney Hatampa's comment, January 26, 2014 10:48 PM
This article contained an abundant amount of useful information. I see, all too often, people avoiding small or relatively unimportant conflict... and just at the article stated it becomes a monumental issue. When dealing with a conflict, it doesn't always have to end with one party or the other in trouble or reprimanded. It is imperative the both parties understand the other. Great read.
Kramer Newsom's comment, January 29, 2014 5:59 PM
This article is spot on. There are too many people who try to avoid conflict but in doing so bottle up all their frustrations and eventually explode on someone. I personally have experienced managers improperly handling work conflicts. Using conflicts as opportunities to learn is ideal but far to often higher ups use conflict to put down other workers rather than building people up. Interesting stuff!
Suggested by Brady Conine
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Benefit of Nonverbal Communication in Business

Benefit of Nonverbal Communication in Business | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Nonverbal communication encompasses numerous modes of expression. Physical examples include posture, gestures, eye contact, touch, physiological responses (such as clammy hands or a sweaty brow) and ...
Andrea Stone's insight:

Pay close attention to nonverbals of politicians and actors. My favorite to look at is the head nod. When someone is saying no but really means yes,  you will see a subtle head nod, and vice versa. 

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Suggested by Samantha Thomas
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The Business of Nonverbal Communication: How Signals Reflect Your Brand

The Business of Nonverbal Communication: How Signals Reflect Your Brand | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
If Verbal Communication Conceals, Do Nonverbal Signals Reveal?
Andrea Stone's insight:

This article talks about intentionally managing your nonverbal communication. Do you think that is ethical? Or is it shady? By the way, if you like nonverbal communication, check out http://www.paulekman.com/. Dr. Ekman is an expert in nonverbal communication. 

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Samantha Thomas's comment, January 26, 2014 9:19 PM
I think managing any nonverbal communication is very difficult overall, because it's not something most people are used to doing. On one hand, intentionally masking your natural nonverbal communication actions seems like the opposite way of thinking for a potential new job. But on the other hand, I can see how it would be very helpful to learn how to manage certain nonverbal actions in professional situations. Whether we like it or not, companies hire based on actions and words more than what we have achieved, or what's listed on our résumé.
Suggested by Meredith Nichole
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Your nonverbal communication can wreck your interview

Your nonverbal communication can wreck your interview | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Your nonverbal communication can wreck your interview - Get Career Advice from the experts at CareerBuilder.com
Andrea Stone's insight:

Great tips! Have you practiced your handshake? It seems silly, but it isn't something that everyone gets right. A bad handshake is a point in the negative column when I am hiring someone. And women, don't think you should have a "feminine" handshake. You should do a full grasp and a good squeeze. And men, be firm, but don't break someone's hand!   

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Meredith Nichole's comment, January 24, 2014 9:13 PM
I havent practiced a handshake. The part I found interesting was the mimicking. I have never heard of it, but I see how it can be helpful.
Andrea Stone's comment, January 26, 2014 12:15 AM
Try it sometime in conversation. Usually it happens by accident, but it is interesting to do on purpose. It really makes the other person more comfortable and makes them feel like you are connecting.
Angelina Duwel's comment, January 26, 2014 11:57 PM
I think these tips are great. It would have been helpful when I took my first professional interview seven years ago. Even for my current job, I was constantly practicing my posture and facial expressions, along with what I would say.
Suggested by Lauren Laird
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How Listening Can Improve Workplace Performance

How Listening Can Improve Workplace Performance | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Listening is an active process that involves focusing on what is said without allowing other thoughts to invade the process. Small business owners and entrepreneurs who employ serious listening ...
Andrea Stone's insight:

Good ideas about listening. 

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Brady Conine's comment, January 24, 2014 12:47 AM
This article has some great points. If everybody listens to one another and actually takes time to think about what others have to say it could greatly improve the production speed of the business.
Skylar Horn's comment, January 24, 2014 11:24 PM
These are good points for business communication in the workforce. I feel it is beneficial for bosses to have the open door policy, and believe it can greatly impact and improve businesses.
Lauren Laird's comment, January 25, 2014 1:00 PM
Thanks! I felt like listening is one of the best keys to success in the workplace. I really enjoyed this article.
Suggested by Amanda Bowman
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Why You Should Schedule A Walking Meeting

Why You Should Schedule A Walking Meeting | BComm Collection 1: Chapter 2 | Scoop.it
Is this the cheesiest stock photo you've ever seen?Photo: ShutterstockWe think it's up there, but before we judge too harshly, consider: There's value in what this duo is doing.
Andrea Stone's insight:

This is kind of funny to me. I think people at my job would think I was crazy to suggest a walking meeting. :) We do have a lot of impromtu standing meetings. What do you all think? How would this work in your organizational cultures?

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Traci Bartgis's comment, January 25, 2014 3:29 PM
I really like the idea of walking and standing meetings. I understand that in some cultures, a walking meeting with only a few people is not as productive as a sit down meeting with a whole team of 20 people. But even if you moved the meeting outside on nice days or had standing meetings it would help the energy flow of employees. I am a receptionist and certainly hate sitting for hour after hour, if I could have a headset and walk around the building that would be great :)
Amanda Bowman's comment, January 26, 2014 12:03 PM
I really liked this idea. I feel like it lets you take a step away from the corporate formal side of meetings, and do something a little more casual while working at the same time. It just seems like it breaks up the day. I have a pretty active job and I'm on my feet all the time. So I can imagine for people who are glued to a chair, this is pretty neat little trick to remain task oriented and stretch your legs.