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Delivering Difficult Messages the Right Way

Delivering Difficult Messages the Right Way | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
Picture this scenario: You leave your boss’s office after hearing there are going to be a number of belt-tightening measures throughout the company that will affect your team’s structure. As you head back to your desk, you feel the acid …Read »
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BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9
This is Scoop.it! 2 with content related to topics in Chapter 9.
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5 Problems with Social Networking in the Workplace

5 Problems with Social Networking in the Workplace | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
The time spent using social networking applications is one reason why many businesses are reluctant to allow employees to use sites like Facebook, MySpace and LinkedIn during office hours. Add the time spent on nonworkrelated browsing, and employers have a point
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How to Break Bad News to Clients

How to Break Bad News to Clients | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
Three tips for delivering bad news without hurting the client relationship, or your credibility.Get the latest blog articles on business ideas and trends...
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Suggested by Alexis Wiedemann
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How to Communicate Bad News Professionally

How to Communicate Bad News Professionally | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
"I have good news and bad news. Which would you like to hear first?" "Oh, give me the bad news first. I want to end on an upbeat note." Prepare for it, because when you have bad news to convey in a professional environment, there are...
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Presentation Tip: Communicating Bad News

Presentation Tip: Communicating Bad News | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
I’ve never done an exact count, but I believe it is safe to say that nearly every single one of the corporate presentations that we design and advise on for our clients is to communicate good news, or more specifically, “hopeful” and forward-looking positive statements.  Sales presentations outline the virtues [...]
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Suggested by Amanda Bowman
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5 Tips On How To Deliver Bad News

5 Tips On How To Deliver Bad News | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
Being the bearer of bad news falls in the category of 'things I'd rather not do' -- along with cleaning bathrooms, fighting off a bear, or installing new software. In all these cases, it's best to be smart about it. And quick. Especially in the case ...
Andrea Stone's insight:

What central themes about delivering bad news are appearing in all of these articles?

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Natasha Earle's comment, March 9, 10:56 PM
I liked this article. It uses similar approaches I use when giving bad news. "By being kind, empathetic, honest and straightforward." Although, I am probably one of the few people I know who don't mind giving bad news. Maybe its because I do most of the things in the article already. Although I do wish they would have listed taking responsibility as a tip too.
Katie Daugherty's comment, March 9, 11:40 PM
I think the central themes of these articles are to be honest and clear and to deliver the news in a timely manner. If employers respect their employees both of these things will be accomplished naturally.
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Delivering Difficult Messages the Right Way

Delivering Difficult Messages the Right Way | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
Picture this scenario: You leave your boss’s office after hearing there are going to be a number of belt-tightening measures throughout the company that will affect your team’s structure. As you head back to your desk, you feel the acid …Read »
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Suggested by Jessica Hunsucker
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10 Tips For Dealing With A Lazy Co-Worker

10 Tips For Dealing With A Lazy Co-Worker | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
Carping and tattling won’t get you anywhere – but there are a few things you can do when you're working with a lazy colleague. Here are 10 tips for dealing with a lazy co-worker.
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Suggested by Jessica Hunsucker
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5 Keys of Dealing with Workplace Conflict

5 Keys of Dealing with Workplace Conflict | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
image credit: DN Nation Here’s the thing - leadership and conflict go hand-in-hand. Leadership is a full-contact sport, and if you cannot or will not address conflict in a healthy, productive fashion, you should not be in a leadership role. From my perspective, the issues surrounding conflict resolution can be best summed-up [...]
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Brady Conine's comment, March 9, 6:36 PM
This is a great article, it brings up and talks about something that seems to becoming more of a problem now-a-days. I have noticed several times just at my job alone that some of my supervisors do not like to step up and handle conflicts going on, and it makes it a lot harder to continue working in that environment. It is better to just step up and handle it right then and there.
Suggested by Lauren Laird
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Communicating Negative Messages | LearnDebate.Net

Andrea Stone's insight:

This article has a bit of a different take on indirect and direct messages than the book, but it still uses that same concept. 

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Meredith Nichole's comment, March 6, 3:55 PM
I like the advice to use direct method when information is urgent. I did not see that in the book.
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Exclusive: Obama personally apologizes for Americans losing health coverage - NBC News

Exclusive: Obama personally apologizes for Americans losing health coverage  - NBC News | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
President Obama said Thursday that he is "sorry" that some Americans are losing their current health insurance plans as a result of the Affordable ...
Andrea Stone's insight:

I normally don't allow political articles and really don't want the conversation here to descend into an ACA good or bad discussion, but in this case, Obama had to deliver bad news. Did he follow the guidelines in the other articles? Remember to be objective here and try to analyze this from your business communication knowledge and not your political viewpoint. By the way, those who lost coverage eventually were permitted to keep them if the insurance companies wanted to offer them again. 

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Jessica Hunsucker's comment, March 6, 5:24 PM
I believe President Obama did a good job delivering his message. His apology was provided with a direct approach while still lightly defending his policy. As President, he holds a higher level of respect and to keep that respect, his apology should be sincere yet not drawn out to the point he looks weak. He did a great job keeping his apology short and to the point.
Suggested by Brady Conine
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Are You Sitting Down? Communicating Bad News Effectively - National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators

Are You Sitting Down? Communicating Bad News Effectively - National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
A national, nonprofit membership organization with a primary focus on student aid legislation, regulatory analysis, and training for financial aid administrators
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Skylar Horn's comment, March 8, 12:40 AM
Brady, this is a great article and I feel it relates perfectly to chapter nine. While reading, I found this article somewhat similar to the one I posted, but my acronym for communicating bad news is BREAKS. This article, I felt it hit the all the major sections in chapter nine of the text spot on. His acronym COMFORT elucidates the concepts to explain clearly and completely all the way through maintaining friendly relations in the textbook. Mello also has a great depiction of direct (clerk one) and indirect (clerk two) approaches from the financial aid administrators. I really feel this article can inform many people how to examine and approach negative news toward others effectively.
Brady Conine's comment, March 9, 6:09 PM
Skylar I completely agree with you commenet about his depictions on direct and indirect approaches. I really enjoyed his COMFORT acronym, it simplifies and helps understand how things should be handled.
Suggested by Tim Taylor
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How to Make Layoffs - Management - WSJ.com

Layoffs are an unfortunate part of corporate life, especially during economic turbulence. But there’s a right way and a wrong way to do them. Here are the do’s and don’ts of layoffs.
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We're Sorry: Not All Apologies Are Apologies

We're Sorry: Not All Apologies Are Apologies | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
Politicians take note: Research shows the fine line between claiming regret and taking responsibility.
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Communicating Bad News

Communicating Bad News | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
How you structure and deliver bad news will affect how it is received. Delivering bad news, whether communicating up, down, or across the organization, is a difficult task. This article gives you strategies to make it easier.
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Suggested by Skylar Horn
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‘BREAKS’ Protocol for Breaking Bad News

Andrea Stone's insight:

Very detailed article, but if you are considering any health careers, it is definitely worth a read.

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Suggested by Shannon Henderson
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How Great Leaders Deliver Bad News

How Great Leaders Deliver Bad News | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
It may be the hardest thing you have to do as a leader - here's how to do it well.
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Suggested by Jessica Hunsucker
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Is it OK to air work grievances on social media?

Is it OK to air work grievances on social media? | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
‘I wish I wouldn’t have done it.” So says Wade Groom, a Lacoste salesman who was fired earlier this year for posting a picture of his paycheck to his private…
Andrea Stone's insight:

Do you share your social media with work friends? Do you vent about work online? Do you think it is appropriate to fire people for sharing work details on social media?

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Katie Daugherty's comment, March 9, 11:24 PM
I'm a firm believer that you shouldn't talk negatively regarding your work on social media. There have been many times that I've wanted to make a joke about something I didn't agree with, or express frustration about a co-worker, but I always stop myself because there is no good that could ever come out of it. I think it is appropriate to fire people based off of their social media information. Social media has become a crutch for people to passive-agressively express their issues instead of actually addressing them, which doesn't work for a professional atmosphere. Employees are a representation of a company, and they are responsible for how they publicly portray the company.
Suggested by Jessica Hunsucker
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How To Quit Your Job Without Burning Your Bridges

How To Quit Your Job Without Burning Your Bridges | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
Wendy S. Goffe, a trusts and estates lawyer in Seattle, hired a consultant to help her leave a position she had held for 13 years, without making anybody angry. His advice surprised her.
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Lauren Laird's comment, March 10, 12:10 AM
I loved this article! Quittinng your job is always an unpleasant situation. I am glad I'm not alone in wanting to leave without burning bridges. I also liked that they pointed out the legal responsibilities. Great job on singling out a negative message!
Suggested by Samantha Thomas
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Toastmasters International - Delivering Bad News

Toastmasters International - Delivering Bad News | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
How to be clear yet comforting.
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Traci Bartgis's comment, March 6, 6:59 PM
In my Interviewing Practices course, we learn about how "forecasting" is the best way to deliver bad news, rather than being blunt or stalling, which is parallel to the information in this article.
Suggested by Meredith Nichole
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How to Decline a Business Proposal Graciously

How to Decline a Business Proposal Graciously | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
The world of business etiquette can be complex and confusing, even to the most savvy business professionals. Oftentimes one business professional will make a business proposal to another. These can ...
Andrea Stone's insight:

There are organizational and interpersonal business "bad news" situations. This article focuses on the interpersonal. 

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Skylar Horn's comment, March 8, 1:16 AM
Meredith, this article denotes effective and lawful advice for crafting bad-news messages, and notice it corresponds to 3-x-3 writing process in chapter nine. I consider steps one and two the most crucial to convey negative message(s) sincerely. I don't know about you, but I feel steps three and four are a bit excessive and maybe choosing between the steps can possibly come off genuine.
Suggested by Katie Daugherty
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The 10 Commandments for Delivering Bad News

The 10 Commandments for Delivering Bad News | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it
This article is by Robert Bies, a professor of management at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business. Moses with the tablets of the Ten Commandments, painting by Rembrandt (1659) (Photo credit: Wikipedia) I have spent more than 20 years researching how managers deliver bad news, and a few rules and commandments have [...]
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Jessica Hunsucker's comment, March 6, 5:39 PM
I also came across this article while researching. I like this article because from the text, my understanding is to use a indirect approach when news is personally upsetting. This article shows that you can be indirect while assertive. For me personally, if I ever have to deliver bad news, I want to wait as long as possible but here we're advised to not delay. Great article.
Katie Daugherty's comment, March 7, 3:20 PM
Delaying bad news is my first instinct as well. I've learned that even if you do think the situation will improve over time, it's best to be upfront about it so there are no surprises. Honesty is better than nothing.
Angelina Duwel's comment, March 8, 10:19 PM
I love the way this article was written! And I completely agree with it! Especially with withholding information. The truth will always come out. To hide information only makes you look bad!
Rescooped by Andrea Stone from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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This CEO is a Train Wreck: 9 Crisis Communication Lessons You Can Learn | Braud Communications

This CEO is a Train Wreck: 9 Crisis Communication Lessons You Can Learn | Braud Communications | BComm Collection 2: Chapter 9 | Scoop.it

...Edward Burkhardt, CEO of Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railways waited 5 days before visiting the crash site andmaking a statement to the media. His statement lacks a significant, quotable apology to those affected, while focusing too much on the technical aspects of dealing with insurance, finances and monetary issues. He even begins his statement by defending whether he is a compassionate person.

 

True, the CEO does not always need to be the spokesperson in every crisis. However, a crisis this big demands an appearance and statement within 24 hours of the onset of the crisis.

 

True, I believe a CEO should spend more time managing the crisis and running the company than trying to be a spokesperson, but a crisis this big demands at least a few hours to talk with the media and the families who have lost loved ones. News reports indicate that at the time of the news briefing, the CEO had not reached out to families....


Via Jeff Domansky
Andrea Stone's insight:

This is a great article about CEO's and crisis communication.

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Jeff Domansky's comment, March 6, 5:11 PM
Meredith Nichole in my opinion, this was so serious only the CEO should comment. If he was deemed unable or not empathetic enough, then next most senior should speak. They had no strategy for the tragedy.
Traci Bartgis's comment, March 6, 6:48 PM
I think it is embaressing that it took the CEO 5 days to respond to such a tragedy. Hopefully he can read this article and be more prepared if something like this happens again.
Katie Daugherty's comment, March 7, 3:37 PM
I like that this outlined exact things to do. A lot of articles just give general ideas, but this one told you actual restrictions. Waiting until the 5th day to respond to a crisis obviously isn't a smart thing to do, but having a statement within an hour is a good requirement. I think in a crisis situation, it's best to make sure the public knows you are reacting, whether there is a fully detailed plan or not.