Basketball History
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History of Basketball - James Naismith

History of Basketball - James Naismith | Basketball History | Scoop.it
James Naismith was the Canadian physical education instructor who invented basketball in 1891.
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A Brief History of Basketball (Just in Time for the Final Four)

A Brief History of Basketball (Just in Time for the Final Four) | Basketball History | Scoop.it
Invented in 1891 by a Canadian immigrant to the United States, basketball has since grown into a sport played and enjoyed around the world.
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The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame - History

The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame - History | Basketball History | Scoop.it
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The Greatest Trash-Talkers in College Basketball History - Bleacher Report

The Greatest Trash-Talkers in College Basketball History - Bleacher Report | Basketball History | Scoop.it
Bleacher Report
The Greatest Trash-Talkers in College Basketball History
Bleacher Report
Trash talk is as much a part of college basketball as no-look passes, tomahawk dunks and get-that-stuff-out-of-here blocks.
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Mean people trash talk

 

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The 10 Most Memorable Individual Performances in College Basketball History - Bleacher Report

The 10 Most Memorable Individual Performances in College Basketball History - Bleacher Report | Basketball History | Scoop.it
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The 10 Most Memorable Individual Performances in College Basketball History
Bleacher Report
Memorable hoops performances are created when a player does something that remarkably exceeds the norm.
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Best college basketball performances

 

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It is OUR history - Juneau Empire

It is OUR historyJuneau EmpireThe 1917 first Alaska Native Brotherhood basketball team, left-to-right: George Dalton, Howard Gray, Tom Williams, Ray James, David Howard, Louis Simpson, Charlie Daniels, and ANB founder Peter Simpson.

Via Terrance H BoothSr
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NBA.com - History of the Basketball

NBA.com - History of the Basketball | Basketball History | Scoop.it
Timeline of Spalding and NBA basketballs
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A good list of what happened

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History of basketball - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

James Naismith published 13 rules for the new game. He divided his class of 18 into 2 teams of 9 players each and set about to teach them the basics of his new game of Basketball.

The objective of the game was to throw the soccer ball, into the fruit baskets nailed to the lower railing of the gym balcony. Every time a point was scored, the game was halted so the janitor could bring out a ladder and retrieve the ball. Later, the bottoms of the fruit baskets were removed. The first public basketball game was played in Springfield, MA, on March 11, 1892. [1][citation needed]

On December 21, 1891, James Naismith published rules for a new game using five base ideas and thirteen rules.[2] That day, he asked his class to play a match in the Armory Street court: 9 versus 9, using a soccer ball and two peach baskets. Frank Mahan, one of his students, wasn’t so happy. He just said: "Huh. Another new game".[3] However, Naismith was the inventor of the new game. Someone proposed to call it “Naismith Game”, but he suggested "We have a ball and a basket: why don’t we call it basket ball"?[4] The eighteen players were: John J. Thompson, Eugene S. Libby, Edwin P. Ruggles, William R. Chase, T. Duncan Patton, Frank Mahan, Finlay G. MacDonald, William H. Davis and Lyman Archibald, who defeated George Weller, Wilbert Carey, Ernest Hildner, Raymond Kaighn, Genzabaro Ishikawa, Benjamin S. French, Franklin Barnes, George Day and Henry Gelan 1–0.[5] The goal was scored by Chase.[6] There were other differences between Naismith’s first idea and the game played today. The peach baskets were closed, and balls had to be retrieved manually, until a small hole was put in the bottom of the peach basket to poke the ball out using a stick. Only in 1906 were metal hoops, nets and back boards introduced. Moreover, earlier the soccer ball was replaced by a Spalding ball, similar to the one used today.[7][8]

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The begging of Basketball

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Ranking the 10 Best Nicknames in College Basketball History - Bleacher Report

Ranking the 10 Best Nicknames in College Basketball History - Bleacher Report | Basketball History | Scoop.it
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Ranking the 10 Best Nicknames in College Basketball History
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They range from creative plays on words that rhyme with the player's name to innovative descriptions of their skills and uniqueness.
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Funny nicknames

 

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Top 10 Greatest White Basketball Players in History of the NBA & WNBA - #Sports

Top 10 Greatest White Basketball Players in History of the NBA & WNBA - #Sports | Basketball History | Scoop.it

"Sports rankings are always going to be subjective. It matters when you were born. It matters who you root for. It matters who you root against. You can argue points, championships, awards, and the ever-present “eye test.” Also, sports rankings are some of the most fun to debate, no matter what the category. With all of that in mind, I bring you the Top 10 greatest white basketball players in the NBA (and WNBA) ever." http://bit.ly/12ew6FN


Via The New Media Moguls
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Then to now

 

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