Basics of Photosynthesis
5.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Basics of Photosynthesis
Resources to help you understand photosynthesis
Curated by Jon Freer
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

Anatomy of the Plant Cell vs a Human Cell | Interactive Biology, by Leslie Samuel

Anatomy of the Plant Cell vs a Human Cell | Interactive Biology, by Leslie Samuel | Basics of Photosynthesis | Scoop.it
This week, I would like to take a break from human anatomy and move on to something different: plant cell anatomy. I know botany is not everyone’s cup of tea; I am included in that category.
more...
CineversityTV's curator insight, January 29, 2013 5:15 AM

Remember biology at school, get educated on photosynthesis.

Nicole's curator insight, November 10, 2013 11:24 PM

What do you find most interesting about the plant cell?

Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

Artificial Photosynthesis Effort Takes Root | MIT Technology Review

Artificial Photosynthesis Effort Takes Root | MIT Technology Review | Basics of Photosynthesis | Scoop.it
A $122 million innovation hub could speed the development of devices for making fuel from water and sunlight.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

Panasonic's Artificial Photosynthesis Turns Water, Sunlight, and CO2 into Useful Chemicals

Panasonic's Artificial Photosynthesis Turns Water, Sunlight, and CO2 into Useful Chemicals | Basics of Photosynthesis | Scoop.it
Artificial photosynthesis--the idea that we might be able to create energy and other useful thing from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide, as plants...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

Biology4Kids.com: Plants: Photosynthesis

Biology4Kids.com: Plants: Photosynthesis | Basics of Photosynthesis | Scoop.it
Biology4Kids.com! The web site that teaches the basics of biology and life science to everyone!

 

Very basic info for kids

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

Photosynthesis and Respiration

013 - Free Energy Capture and Storage Paul Andersen details the processes of photosynthesis and respiration in this video on free energy capture and storage....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

THE PHOTOSYNTHESIS SONG

This song is by Peter Weatherwall. Like, Comment, Share, Favorite! Subscribe to my channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=missygirl213 ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

The Difference Engine: The sunbeam solution

The Difference Engine: The sunbeam solution | Basics of Photosynthesis | Scoop.it
FOR decades, your correspondent has watched, with more than casual interest, every new twist and turn in the quest for an “artificial leaf”. His hope has been...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

Global artificial photosynthesis: Overcoming scientific and public policy challenges

Professor Thomas Faunce presents a public lecture, Global artificial photosynthesis for a sustainable world: Overcoming scientific and public policy challeng...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

HowStuffWorks "How Artificial Photosynthesis Works"

HowStuffWorks "How Artificial Photosynthesis Works" | Basics of Photosynthesis | Scoop.it
Artificial photosynthesis allows us to replicate one of nature's miracles. Visit HowStuffWorks to learn all about artificial photosynthesis.
more...
Nicole's curator insight, November 10, 2013 11:29 PM

How important do you think artificial photosynthesis is?

 

Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

Photosynthesis - Energy in a Cell

http://www.interactive-biology.com - Photosynthesis is the process that plants use to convert energy from the Sun into food. In this lecture, I talk about th...
more...
Nicole's curator insight, November 10, 2013 11:30 PM

Very important to understand...

 

Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

photosynthesis demo

It's that time of the semester again! Time for a quick and dirty demonstration of photosynthesis via a subliminal image of a phenol red pH shift as the elode...

 

Fun music...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

Photosynthesis: CrashCourse Biology #8

Hank explains the extremely complex series of reactions whereby plants feed themselves on sunlight, carbon dioxide and water, and also create some by product...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jon Freer
Scoop.it!

Photosynthesis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Photosynthesis (play /ftˈsɪnθəsɪs/; from the Greek φώτο- [photo-], "light," and σύνθεσις [synthesis], "putting together", "composition") is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert the light energy captured from the sun into chemical energy that can be used to fuel the organism's activities. Photosynthesis occurs in plants, algae, and many species of bacteria, but not in archaea. Photosynthetic organisms are called photoautotrophs, since they can create their own food. In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosynthesis uses carbon dioxide and water, releasing oxygen as a waste product. Photosynthesis is vital for all aerobic life on Earth. In addition to maintaining normal levels of oxygen in the atmosphere, photosynthesis is the source of energy for nearly all life on earth, either directly, through primary production, or indirectly, as the ultimate source of the energy in their food,[1] the exceptions being chemoautotrophs that live in rocks or around deep sea hydrothermal vents. The average rate of energy capture by photosynthesis globally is immense, approximately 130 terawatts,[2][3][4] which is about six times larger than the power consumption of human civilization.[5] As well as energy, photosynthesis is also the source of the carbon in all the organic compounds within organisms' bodies. In all, photosynthetic organisms convert around 100–115 thousand million metric tons (i.e., 100–115 petagrams) of carbon into biomass per year.[6][7]

Although photosynthesis can happen in different ways in different species, some features are always the same. For example, the process always begins when energy from light is absorbed by proteins called photosynthetic reaction centers that contain chlorophylls. In plants, these proteins are held inside organelles called chloroplasts, while in bacteria they are embedded in the plasma membrane. Some of the light energy gathered by chlorophylls is stored in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The rest of the energy is used to remove electrons from a substance such as water. These electrons are then used in the reactions that turn carbon dioxide into organic compounds. In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, this is done by a sequence of reactions called the Calvin cycle, but different sets of reactions are found in some bacteria, such as the reverse Krebs cycle in Chlorobium. Many photosynthetic organisms have adaptations that concentrate or store carbon dioxide. This helps reduce a wasteful process called photorespiration that can consume part of the sugar produced during photosynthesis.

The first photosynthetic organisms probably evolved about 3,500 million years ago, early in the evolutionary history of life, when all forms of life on Earth were microorganisms and the atmosphere had much more carbon dioxide. They most likely used hydrogen or hydrogen sulfide as sources of electrons, rather than water.[8] Cyanobacteria appeared later, around 3,000 million years ago, and drastically changed the Earth when they began to oxygenate the atmosphere, beginning about 2,400 million years ago.[9] This new atmosphere allowed the evolution of complex life such as protists. Eventually, no later than a billion years ago, one of these protists formed a symbiotic relationship with a cyanobacterium, producing the ancestor of many plants and algae.[10] The chloroplasts in modern plants are the descendants of these ancient symbiotic cyanobacteria.[11]

It's wikipedia...be careful

more...
No comment yet.