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Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map

Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map | Basic Geography Concepts | Scoop.it
No one quite agrees on what counts as America's "Midwest," but its pattern of urbanization is one of a kind.

Via John Blunnie, Seth Dixon
Mark Solomon's insight:

The American Midwest is a good example of a vernacular region, as it is perceived in different ways by many different people as an important part of their cultural history.

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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 27, 2013 5:49 PM

Article on what American's consider the "midwest". Its interesting how different people can view were a region is when it has no official boundaries.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2013 10:30 AM

Regions can have very nebulous borders...the Midwest is a perfect example of a vernacular region with as many different borders as there are people to draw them. 


Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:08 PM

It really is hard to determine the regions as everyone has their own ideas and opinions of what consititues a region.  Some I think are easy because they have been set in history, like New England. It is the six north east states that has long been set in history.  However something like the South is hard to define.  Is Texas the south becasue it fought with the south in the Civil War or is it part of the west because it is west of the Mississippi? 

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Rescooped by Mark Solomon from Regional Geography
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Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map

Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map | Basic Geography Concepts | Scoop.it
No one quite agrees on what counts as America's "Midwest," but its pattern of urbanization is one of a kind.

Via John Blunnie, Seth Dixon
Mark Solomon's insight:

The American Midwest is a good example of a vernacular region, as it is perceived in different ways by many different people as an important part of their cultural history.

more...
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 27, 2013 5:49 PM

Article on what American's consider the "midwest". Its interesting how different people can view were a region is when it has no official boundaries.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2013 10:30 AM

Regions can have very nebulous borders...the Midwest is a perfect example of a vernacular region with as many different borders as there are people to draw them. 


Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:08 PM

It really is hard to determine the regions as everyone has their own ideas and opinions of what consititues a region.  Some I think are easy because they have been set in history, like New England. It is the six north east states that has long been set in history.  However something like the South is hard to define.  Is Texas the south becasue it fought with the south in the Civil War or is it part of the west because it is west of the Mississippi? 

Rescooped by Mark Solomon from Geography Education
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Start-of-the-Year Videos

Start-of-the-Year Videos | Basic Geography Concepts | Scoop.it

"This is a compilation of videos that can be used to at the beginning of the school year to show the importance of geography, spatial thinking and geo-literacy."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jaiden VerSteeg's comment, August 29, 2013 11:41 PM
I watched video #1 and I thought it was very interesting. It was a great way to show what we are going to be learning about. I am really looking forward to learning about it.
Alexandria Goodyk's comment, August 29, 2013 11:59 PM
I watched video #3 and it's crazy how one video can give us so much information. I am so excited to learn new things this year and get educated with all of this stuff.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:29 PM

Great little starters to get the students engaged with Geography!

Rescooped by Mark Solomon from AP Human Geography Resources
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How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...

 

This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.

 

Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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The United Countries of Baseball Map

The United Countries of Baseball Map | Basic Geography Concepts | Scoop.it

This is the new and improved version of the familiar map can teach regions (formal, functional, vernacular) as well as the importance on TV markets as a diffusion mechanism for culture.  As mentioned by Andy Baker, "This map is also useful for showcasing 'threshold' and 'range' from 'Central Place Theory.' For instance, I ask my students, 'Why are the Mid-Atlantic & California coasts boundaries (range) so small compared to Great Plains teams?'"  Great idea Andy!


Via Seth Dixon
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Andy Baker's comment, January 28, 2012 12:21 PM
This map is also useful for showcasing "threshold" and "range" from "Central Place Theory." For instance, I ask my students, "Why are the Mid-Atlantic & California coasts boundaries (range) so small compared to Great Plains teams?"

By the way, every Social Studies teacher (K-12, Post-Secondary) should have Seth's page bookmarked. Too much applicable & good stuff on here.
ASeagrave's comment, January 30, 2012 2:14 PM
It's crazy how obsessed the eastern side of the country is with baseball, but how oblivious and uninterested the western side is.
LMullen's comment, February 2, 2012 5:17 PM
I'd like to see a sales map with this because even thoug the Yankees and Redsox regions are much smaller than the Atlanta Braves or Texas Rangers, they pobably sell MUCH more.
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How One Guy in Oregon Made the Best U.S. Map You’ll Ever See

How One Guy in Oregon Made the Best U.S. Map You’ll Ever See | Basic Geography Concepts | Scoop.it
American mapmaking’s most prestigious honor is the “Best of Show” award at the annual competition of the Cartography and Geographic Information Society.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World «TwistedSifter

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World «TwistedSifter | Basic Geography Concepts | Scoop.it
A collection of quirky, important and creative maps that bring data and facts to life. A must-see for visual learners and info lovers.
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Satellite eye on Earth: June 2013 – in pictures

Satellite eye on Earth: June 2013 – in pictures | Basic Geography Concepts | Scoop.it
Wild fires of Canada and Indonesia, sand storms and steam spewing volcanoes were among the images captured by European Space Agency and Nasa satellites last month

Via Seth Dixon
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Chad Ewell's comment, September 13, 2013 11:25 PM
Its incredible how much we can see on maps now a days. Our technology now a days never stops amazing me and this just shows how advanced we actually are in the technology field. This definitely takes maps too a whole new level.
Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:18 PM
man, and geologists say we see a volcano, or an earthquake. well you could but you wouldn't be there for long.
Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:00 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

Rescooped by Mark Solomon from Harmony Social Studies
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Spatial Diffusion: how regions interact

Describes major regions geographers divide the world into and how spatial diffusion relates to regions

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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Here are some questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 1:16 PM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

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Geographic Information Systems Help Scholars See History

Geographic Information Systems Help Scholars See History | Basic Geography Concepts | Scoop.it
Many-layered mapmaking is helping scholars recreate vanished landscapes and envision history.

Via Geocrusader80
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jminium courses's curator insight, July 11, 2013 12:42 PM

One of the reasons GIS is so important- it allows Geographers to see what has happened, and possibly help predict what will happen based on previous patterns!

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40 Maps That Show How The World Works

40 Maps That Show How The World Works | Basic Geography Concepts | Scoop.it
As we’ve mentioned time and time again, there are a lot of creative ways to share information through mapmaking. Recently, a collection of quirky maps made the rounds online.
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